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Author Cho, S. H.; Whang, W. W. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Alcohol Dependence: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Acupuncture; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used in the treatment of substance-related disorders for the past 30 years. However, a systematic review to assess the effect of various types of acupuncture for alcohol dependence has not yet been performed. The present systematic review assessed the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs of acupuncture for alcohol dependence up to June 2008 with no language restrictions. The methodological qualities of eligible studies were assessed using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook. Results: Eleven studies, which comprised a total of 1,110 individual cases, were systematically reviewed. Only 2 of 11 trials reported satisfactorily all quality criteria. Four trials comparing acupuncture treatment and sham treatments reported data for alcohol craving. Three studies reported that there were no significant differences. Among 4 trials comparing acupuncture and no acupuncture with conventional therapies, 3 reported significant reductions. No differences between acupuncture and sham treatments were found for completion rates (Risk Ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.91 to 1.25) or acupuncture and no acupuncture (Risk Ratio = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.67). Only 3 RCTs reported acupuncture-related adverse events, which were mostly minimal. Conclusions: The results of the included studies were equivocal, and the poor methodological quality and the limited number of the trials do not allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of alcohol dependence. More research and well-designed, rigorous, and large clinical trials are necessary to address these issues  
  Address From the Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 177  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Halbreich, U. url  openurl
  Title Systematic reviews of clinical trials of acupuncture as treatment for depression: how systematic and accurate are they? Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 293-300 JA - CNS.Spectr  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Depression; Systematic Review; Depressive Disorder; AcuTrials; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract  
  Address Biobehavior Research, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hantoushzadeh, S.; Alhusseini, N.; Lebaschi, A. H. openurl 
  Title The effects of acupuncture during labour on nulliparous women: A randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 47 Issue 1 Pages 26-30  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Penetrating Sham; Labor Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Labor, Obstetric;  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture is as an ancient system of diagnosis and treatment. It is regarded as a complementary tool for pain management. Aims: To assess the effects of acupuncture on nulliparous women during labour with respect to pain, labour duration and maternal acceptability. Methods: One hundred and forty-four healthy nulliparous women in active phase were randomised into the study and control group, receiving real and minimal acupuncture, respectively. Visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. Objectives were to evaluate acupuncture effect on pain and labour duration and patients' willingness to receive acupuncture for subsequent pregnancies. Results: Visual analogue scale pain score in the study group was lower after two hours. Active phase duration and the oxytocin units administered were lower in the study group. Study group patients had greater willingness to receive acupuncture again. No adverse effects were detected. Conclusions: Acupuncture could reduce pain experience, active phase duration and oxytocin units. Patients were satisfied and no adverse effects were noted  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vali Asr Research Centre for Reproductive Health, Imam Medical Complex, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 150  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 432  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, M. S.; Shin, B. C.; Ernst, E. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for treating erectile dysfunction: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Erectile Dysfunction; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Genital Diseases, Male  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE We evaluated the current evidence for the use of acupuncture to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). METHODS Systematic searches were conducted in 15 electronic databases, with no language restrictions. Hand-searches included conference proceedings and our files. All clinical studies of acupuncture as a treatment for ED were considered for inclusion, and their methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad score. RESULTS Of the four studies included, one randomized controlled trial (RCT) showed beneficial effects of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture in terms of response rate, while another RCT found no effects of acupuncture. The remaining two studies were uncontrolled clinical trials. Collectively these data showed that RCTs of acupuncture for ED are feasible but scarce. Most investigations had methodological flaws, e.g. inadequate study design, poor reporting of results, small sample size, and publication without appropriate peer review process. CONCLUSION The evidence is insufficient to suggest that acupuncture is an effective intervention for treating ED. Further research is required to investigate whether there are specific benefits of acupuncture for men with ED  
  Address Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Erectile Dysfunction
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 656  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sertel, S.; Bergmann, Z.; Ratzlaff, K.; Baumann, I.; Greten, H. J.; Plinkert, P. K. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for nasal congestion: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Sinusitis; Nasal Congestion; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Respiratory Tract Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Nasal congestion is one of the most common complaints dealt with in otorhinolaryngology. Side effects of decongestants are frequently seenin patients with chronic nasal congestion. This leads to an increasing demand of alternative treatments such as acupuncture. Future studies on acupuncture should aim at objectifying effects by both physical measuring and double blinding. Therefore, we were interested in whether these effects can potentially be measured as increase in nasal airflow (NAF) in ventus (“wind”) disease of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).METHODS: Twenty-four patients with a history of nasal congestion due to hypertrophic inferior turbinates or chronic sinusitis without polyposis wereadditionally diagnosed according to the Heidelberg model of TCM. They were asked to score the severity of their nasal congestion on a visual analog scale(VAS). The acupuncturist was blinded according to the Heidelberg blinding assay. NAF was measured by using active anterior rhinomanometry (ARM).Specific verum acupoints according to the Chinese medical diagnosis were tested against nonspecific control acupoints. VAS and NAF were scored andmeasured before and 15 and 30 minutes after acupuncture.RESULTS: Control acupuncture showed a significant improvement in VAS and a deterioration of NAF. Verum acupuncture showed highly significantimprovements in VAS and NAF. In addition, verum acupuncture improved NAF and VAS significantly over time.CONCLUSION: Our control and verum acupoints fulfill the condition of a control and verum treatment, respectively. Measuring NAF by RRM and scoringVAS are possible and reflect acupuncture effects in vivo  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 24  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Sinusitis
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1030  
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Author Standish, L. J.; Kozak, L.; Congdon, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture Is Underutilized in Hospice and Palliative Medicine Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11 JA - Am J Hosp.P  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cancer; Dyspnea; Nausea; Pain; Palliative Care; Systematic Review; Vomiting; Xerostomia; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Dry Mouth  
  Abstract Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medical modality. A considerable body of acupuncture research has accumulated since 1998. Acupuncture has been integrated into palliative care settings in the United Kingdom but is yet to be widely offered in the United States. The literature was searched to identify clinical trials involving acupuncture, palliative care, hospice, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bone marrow, and cancer. Twenty-seven randomized controlled clinical trials of acupuncture were found that reported on conditions common to the hospice and palliative care setting, including dyspnea, nausea and vomiting, pain, and xerostomia, and 23 reported statistically significant results favoring acupuncture use for the conditions investigated. Acupuncture is safe and clinically cost-effective for management of common symptoms in palliative care and hospice patients. Acupuncture has potential as adjunctive care in palliative and end-of-life care, and the evidence warrants its inclusion in reimbursed palliative and end-of-life care in the United States  
  Address Bastyr University  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hospice Care
  Disease Category Acupuncture Utilization OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1098  
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Author Stener-Victorin, E.; Jedel, E.; Manneras, L. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Current Experimental and Clinical Evidence Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Genital Diseases, Female; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract This review describes the aetiology and pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and evaluates the use of acupuncture to prevent and reduce symptoms related with PCOS. PCOS is the most common female endocrine disorder and it is strongly associated with hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction and obesity. PCOS increases the risk for metabolic disturbances such as hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and an increase of developing cardiovascular risk factors and impaired mental health later in life. Despite extensive research, little is known about the aetiology of PCOS. The syndrome is associated with peripheral and central factors that influence sympathetic nerve activity. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system may be an important factor in the development and maintenance of PCOS. Many women with PCOS require prolonged treatment. Current pharmacological approaches are effective but have adverse effects. Therefore, non-pharmacological treatment strategies need to be evaluated. Clearly, acupuncture can affect PCOS via modulation of endogenous regulatory systems, including the sympathetic nervous system, the endocrine and the neuroendocrine system. Experimental observations in rat models of steroid-induced polycystic ovaries and clinical data from studies in women with PCOS suggest that acupuncture exert long-lasting beneficial effects on metabolic and endocrine systems and ovulation  
  Address Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Goteborg University, Sweden; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1107  
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Author Yeung, W. F.; Chung, K. F.; Leung, Y. K.; Zhang, S. P.; Law, A. C. url  openurl
  Title Traditional needle acupuncture treatment for insomnia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Insomnia; Nervous System Diseases; Acupuncture; Sleep Disorders; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Previous reviews regarding traditional needle acupuncture (TNA) treatment for insomnia were limited to English scientific literature. A comprehensive review including Chinese and English literature has therefore been conducted to examine the efficacy of TNA for insomnia. METHODS: We performed systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TNA as intervention for insomnia against placebo, Western medication, and non-treated controls. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by the modified Jadad score and the acupuncture procedure was appraised by the STRICTA criteria. RESULTS: Twenty RCTs were identified for detailed analysis. Majority of the RCTs concluded that TNA was significantly more effective than benzodiazepines for treating insomnia, with mean effective rates for acupuncture and benzodiazepines being 91% and 75%, respectively. In two more appropriately conducted trials, TNA appeared to be more efficacious in improving sleep than sleep hygiene counseling and sham acupuncture. Standardized and individualized acupuncture had similar effective rates. Despite these positive outcomes, there were methodological shortcomings in the studies reviewed, including imprecise diagnostic procedure, problems with randomization, blinding issues, and insufficient safety data. Hence, the superior efficacy of TNA over other treatments could not be ascertained. CONCLUSION: Since the majority of evidence regarding TNA for insomnia is based on studies with poor-quality research designs, the data, while somewhat promising, do not allow a clear conclusion on the benefits of TNA for insomnia. Moreover, the results support the need for large scale placebo-controlled double-blinded trials  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1384  
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Author Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. openurl 
  Title Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Environ Health Perspect Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 261-6 LID - 10.1289/ehp.  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; China/epidemiology; Coal/*adverse effects; Cohort Studies; Female; *Household Articles; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Pneumonia/chemically induced/*epidemiology/*mortality; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Pmc – Pmc2649229; Oid – Nlm: Pmc2649229; Oto – Notnlm; OT – coal; OT – cohort study; OT – indoor air pollution; OT – pneumonia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Environmental health perspectives Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 117 Condition 2
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240 , USA. shenmi@mail.nih.gov; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=19270797 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1553  
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Author Soliman, A.; O'Driscoll, G.A.; Pruessner, J.; Joober, R.; Ditto, B.; Streicker, E.; Goldberg, Y.; Caro, J.; Rekkas, P.V.; Dagher, A. openurl 
  Title Limbic response to psychosocial stress in schizotypy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Schizophr Res Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 184-91 LID - 10.1016/j.s  
  Keywords Adolescent; Brain Mapping; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/metabolism; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Limbic System/*blood supply; Linear Models; *Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Oxygen/blood; Personality Inventory; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Saliva; Schizotypal Personality Disorder/complications/*pathology; Stress, Psychological/complications/*pathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Psychological stress causes dopamine release in the striatum and is thought to play a role in susceptibility to psychotic illness. Previous work suggests that an elevated dopaminergic response to stress may index vulnerability to psychosis in certain individuals. With functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured stress-induced changes in brain activity in healthy individuals at elevated risk of developing psychosis. Participants were 15 controls and 25 psychometric schizotypes: 12 with positive symptom schizotypy (perceptual aberrations) and 13 with negative symptom schizotypy (physical anhedonia), as determined by questionnaires (Chapman et al., 1976; Chapman and Chapman, 1978). In the scanner, participants performed the Montreal Imaging Stress Task and a matched sensory-motor control task. Measures of self-reported stress and salivary cortisol levels were taken throughout the experiment. All three groups showed significant increases in self-reported stress and significant fMRI signal change in the striatal, limbic and cortical regions. However, the Physical Anhedonia group showed greater stress-induced striatal and limbic deactivation than the other two groups. Deactivation in the striatum was significantly correlated with Physical Anhedonia score across all subjects. Our findings suggest the presence of abnormalities in striatal response to stress in negative symptom schizotypy.  
  Address  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Schizophrenia research Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 131 Condition 1-3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=21705195 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1556  
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Author Renghi, A.; Gramaglia, L.; Ciarlo, M.; Cerioli, S.; Albani, A. openurl 
  Title [Fast track in abdominal aortic surgery] Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Minerva Anestesiol Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 441-446  
  Keywords Aged; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/*surgery; Critical Pathways; Humans  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of a new perioperative approach to improve the outcome and to reduce hospitalisation after abdominal aortic surgery. METHODS: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: observational study on patients operated from October 1996 to October 1997 (Group 1996), and from November 1997 to November 1998 (group 1998). CENTRE: Anaesthesiology Department of Regional Hospital. PATIENTS: historical group: 56 patients surgically treated with abdominal aortic bypass in 1996. CASE CONTROL GROUP: 58 patients surgically treated with abdominal aortic bypass in 1998. INTERVENTION: group 1996: maintenance of anaesthesia with forane and fentanyl; postoperative infusion of mepivacaine 1% through lumbar epidural catheter. GROUP 1998: preoperative anaesthesia through thoracic (T 4) epidural catheter with infusion of bupivacaine 0.5%; maintenance of anaesthesia with propofol, fentanyl and infusion of bupivacaine 0.125%; postoperative infusion of bupivacaine 0.125%, early rehabilitation care (early removal of nasogastric tube and urinary catheter, early deambulation, feeding and physiotherapy). EVALUATION: analgesia efficacy, day of deambulation, day of removal of the urinary catheter and the nasogastric tube, day of bowel canalization, day of discharge, major complications. RESULTS: In group 1998 analgesia was better. Furthermore a significant improvement consisted in the earlier removal of the nasogastric tube and the urinary catheter, earlier return of the gastrointestinal function and earlier deambulation. The length of stay is significantly reduced. In group 1998 we have less complications. CONCLUSIONS: Total intra-venous anaesthesia associated with a thoracic epidural anaesthesia, connected with early rehabilitation may improve the outcome and reduce the length of stay in patients submitted to abdominal aortic surgery.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Minerva anestesiologica Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 67 Condition 6
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/23/2015; Priority: Normal; Ospedale degli Infermi, Biella, Italy.; ita; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=11533542 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1562  
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Author Wang, S.; Qian, Y.F.; Fan, X.N.; Zhang, Y.N.; Wei, Y.Y.; Zhang, X.; Wu, H.Q.; Li, Y.J.; Liu, J.; Shi, X.M. openurl 
  Title [Experimental study on Shuigou (GV 26) of inhibiting effect for neuronal necrosis in rats: morphological evidence of the specificity of acupoint] Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Zhongguo Zhen Jiu Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 733-738  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; *Acupuncture Therapy; Animals; Brain Ischemia/*pathology/physiopathology/*therapy; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Male; Necrosis; Neurons/*pathology/ultrastructure; Random Allocation; Rats; Rats, Wistar  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of acupoint Shuigou (GV 26) and non-acupoint on inhibiting the neuronal necrosis induced by the middle cerebral artery obstruction (MCAO) in rats through the morphological observation. METHODS: Forty two healthy adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a normal group, false-ope ration group, model control group, non-acupuncture group, Shuigou-acupuncture group and non-acupoint acupuncture group, 7 rats in each group. Besides the normal and false-operation groups, the experimental modal of MCAO was established in the other groups by using the Zea-Longa thread method. Acupoint Shuigou (GV 26) and non-acupoint (below the costal region) were selected respectively in the Shuigou-acupuncture group and non-acupoint acupuncture group for puncturing at 180 times/min for 5 seconds. Its effect was estimated by measuring the rate of the neuronal necrosis at the level of the light microscope and the degree of the neuronal necrosis at the level of the electron microscope. RESULTS: (1) At the level of the light microscope, comparing with the model control group (0.66 +/- 0.18), of the neuronal necrosis there were no significant differences in the rate of neuronal necrosis in the non-acupuncture group (0.67 +/- 0.34) and non-acupoint acupuncture group (0.59 +/- 0.11) (both P > 0.05), while it was significantly decreased in the Shuigou-acupuncture group (0.200 +/- 12) (P < 0.05). It indicates that no intervention and wrong (non-acupoint) intervention could light the damage of the neurons, however, only right intervention (Shuigou, GV 26) can obviously decrease the rate of the neuronal necrosis, showing with the specificity of acupoint. (2) At the level of the electron microscope, the ultrastructure of the involved neurons in the non-acupuncture group and non-acupoint acupuncture group is similar to that of the model control group, showing with the serious edema and structure damage. In contrast, the ultrastructure of the involved neurons in the Shuigou-acupuncture group is similar to that of the normal group and false-operation group, showing with light neuronal damage. CONCLUSION: Acupuncturing Shuigou (GV 26) could protect the involved neurons and inhibit the neuronal necrosis induced by the MCAO in rats, but acupuncturing the non-acupoint couldn't, which imply that there is the specificity of acupoint in the acupuncture.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Zhongguo zhen jiu = Chinese acupuncture & moxibustion Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 29 Condition 9
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Priority: Normal; Tianjin Key Laboratory of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Tianjin Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Tianjin 300193, China.; chi; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=19803243 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1574  
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Author Salar, G.; Job, I.; Mingrino, S.; Bosio, A.; Trabucchi, M. openurl 
  Title Effect of transcutaneous electrotherapy on CSF beta-endorphin content in patients without pain problems Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 169-172  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To test the hypothesis of opiate-like peptide release after transcutaneous electrotherapy we measured beta-endorphin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content in 13 patients without pain problems. The results indicate a time dependent increase of CSF beta-endorphin in the group of patients studied. This fact suggests that the analgesic properties of the treatment may be ascribed to an involvement of the endogenous opiates system, independently from the basal clinical conditions of the patients.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Pain Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 10 Condition 2
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; eng Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1639  
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Author Lin, C.F.; Liao, J.M.; Tsai, S.J.; Chiang, P.Y.; Ting, H.; Tang, C.Y.; Lou, K.L.; Hsieh, L.C.; Wang, D.W.; Lin, T.B. openurl 
  Title Depressor effect on blood pressure and flow elicited by electroacupuncture in normal subjects Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Auton Neurosci Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 60-64  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To clarify the effect of electroacupuncture (Ea) on the activity of the cardiovascular system in normal individuals, hemodynamic parameters including arterial blood pressure (BP), finger blood flow (FBF) and heart rate (HR) as well as paravertebral temperature (PVT) were non-invasively recorded under Ea stimulation. Surface stimulation electrode was placed on the Hoku point (Li-4). Square wave pulses (0.05 ms) were applied from a stimulator with a stimulation frequency of 2 Hz (3 min). The stimulation intensity was five times of sensory threshold. BP and FBF were decreased (68.5+/-6.0%, P<0.01 and 96.8+/-1.1%, P<0.01 of control, respectively, n=7) while HR and PVT were increased significantly (115.0+/-5.1 of control, P<0.05 and 0.054+/-0.004 degree C, P<0.01, respectively, n=7) during Ea treatment. The results suggested an inhibition in sympathetic outflow, which induced vasodilatation of systemic arteriole and decrease in BP and FBF were elicited by Ea stimulation.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; School of Physical Therapy, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. tblin@csmu.edu.tw; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12927228 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1652  
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Author Itoh, K.; Ochi, H.; Kitakoji, H. openurl 
  Title Effects of tender point acupuncture on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS)--a pragmatic trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Chin Med Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Rct; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Non Specific Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness; Doms  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is used to reduce inflammation and decrease pain in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This study investigates the efficacy of acupuncture on the symptoms of DOMS. METHODS: Thirty subjects were assigned randomly to there groups, namely the control, non-tender point and tender point groups. Measurement of pain with full elbow flexion was used as indices of efficacy. Measurements were taken before and after exercise, immediately after treatment and seven days after treatment. RESULTS: Significant differences in visual analog scores for pain were found between the control group and tender point group immediately after treatment and three days after exercise (P<0.05, Dunnetts multiple test). CONCLUSION: The results show that tender point acupuncture relieves muscle pain of DOMS.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Chinese medicine Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 3 Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 9/17/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Department of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Meiji University of Integrative Medicine, Nantan, Kyoto 629-0392, Japan. kitoh@meiji-u.ac.jp; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&listuids=19032777 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1669  
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Author Hubscher, M.; Vogt, L.; Bernhorster, M.; Rosenhagen, A.; Banzer, W. openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on symptoms and muscle function in delayed-onset muscle soreness Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication J Altern Complement Med Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1011-6 LID - 10.1089/acm.  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study was done to investigate the effects of a standardized acupuncture treatment on symptoms and muscle function in exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled, observer and subject-blinded trial was undertaken. Twenty-two (22) healthy subjects (22-30 years; 10 males and 12 females) were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: real acupuncture (deep needling at classic acupuncture points and tender points; n = 7), sham-acupuncture (superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; n = 8), and control (no needling; n = 7). DOMS of the nondominant elbow-flexors was experimentally induced through eccentric contractions until exhaustion. The outcome measures were pain perception (visual analogue scale; VAS; range: 0-10 cm), mechanical pain threshold (MPT; pressure algometer), and maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF; force transducer). Treatment was applied immediately, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS induction. Measurements of MPT and MIVF were made prior to DOMS induction as well as before and after every treatment session. VAS data were acquired after DOMS induction as well as pre- and post-treatment. Final pain, MPT, and MIVF measurements were performed 72 hours after DOMS induction. RESULTS: Following nonparametric testing, there were no significant differences between groups in outcome measures at baseline. After 72 hours, pain perception (VAS) was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared to the sham acupuncture and control subjects. However, the mean MPT and MIVF scores were not significantly different between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although acupuncture seemed to have no effects on mechanical pain threshold and muscle function, it proved to reduce perceived pain arising from exercise-induced muscle soreness.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 14 Condition 8
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 5/21/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. m.huebscher@sport.uni-frankfurt.de; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=18990049 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1675  
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Author Chen, H.; Fu, J. openurl 
  Title Special Topic Study Therapeutic Effect Observation on Warm Needling for Keloidal Acne Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 145-148  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of warm needling therapy for keloidal acne. Methods: The 66 cases with keloidal acne were randomly allocated into a treatment group and a control group, 36 in the treatment group and 30 in the control group. The cases in the treatment group were treated with warm needling therapy upon qi arrival, whereas those in the control group were treated with acupuncture alone. Then the skin lesion, inflammation and improvement of the constitution were compared before and after treatment. The clinical efficacies in the two groups were also compared. Results: The skin lesion, inflammation and constitutional improvement in the treatment group were superior to the control group (P<0.05). The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.05), coupled with a lower relapse rate. Conclusion: Warm needling can result in a fast effect and lower rate of relapses for keloidal acne without toxic or adverse reactions. Additionally, in can also strengthen the patient's constitution.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/2/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; 1, Fu Jieying 1 Xiamen City Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fujian 361009, P. R. China 2 School of Acupuncture and Tuina, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong 510405, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1723  
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Author Zhu, B.; Shan, Y. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Tourette Syndrome Treated by Different Acupuncture Methods Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 233-235  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To approach a better solution for enhancing the therapeutic results of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, by observing the clinical results of combined scalp with body acupuncture and mono-body acupuncture. Methods: Fifty-seven patients were randomized into a treatment group (31 cases) and a control group (26 cases). The patients in the treatment group all received combined scalp-body acupuncture treatment, while the patients in the control group were given mono-body acupuncture treatment, for 1 month as a treatment session. At the end of the third treatment session, the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) would be compared between pre- and post-treatment. Results: In the treatment group, 2 patients were clinically cured, 4 showed markedly effective, 18 "showed effective, and 7 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 77.4%. In the control group, 0 were clinically cured, 3 showed markedly effective, 9 showed effective, 14 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 46.2%. There was a significant difference between the two total therapeutic rates (P<0.05). Conclusion: The combination of scalp and body acupuncture had a better therapeutic result than the mono-body acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 3/19/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200071, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1737  
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Author Lee, M. S.; Shin, B. C.; Ronan, P.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 63 Issue 11 Pages 1622-1633 JA - Int.J Cli  
  Keywords Mental Disorders; Schizophrenia; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; AcuTrials  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is one of the most popular types of complementary/alternative medicine. It is sometimes used as a treatment for schizophrenia. AIMS: The objective of this review is to assess systematically the clinical evidence for or against acupuncture as a treatment for schizophrenia. METHODS: We searched 20 databases from their inception to May 2009 without language restrictions. All randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture, with or without electrical stimulation or moxibustion for patients with schizophrenia were considered for inclusion. RESULTS: Thirteen RCTs, all originating from China, met the inclusion criteria. One RCT reported significant effects of electroacupuncture (EA) plus drug therapy for improving auditory hallucunations and positive symptom compared with sham EA plus drug therapy. Four RCTs showed significant effects of acupuncture for response rate compared with antipsychotic drugs [n = 360, relative risk (RR): 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.34, p = 0.01; heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 2.98, p = 0.39, I(2) = 0%]. Seven RCTs showed significant effects of acupuncture plus antipsychotic drug therapy for response rate compared with antipsychotic drug therapy (n = 457, RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.04-1.28, p = 0.008, heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 6.56, p = 0.36, I(2) = 9%). Two RCTs tested laser acupuncture against sham laser acupuncture. One RCT found beneficial effects of laser acupuncture on hallucination and the other RCT showed significant effects of laser acupuncture on response rate, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and clinical global index compared with sham laser. The methodological quality was generally poor and there was not a single high quality trial. CONCLUSION: These results provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia. However, the total number of RCTs, the total sample size and the methodological quality were too low to draw firm conclusions. As all studies originated from China, international studies are needed to test whether there is any effect  
  Address Division of Standard Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811, South Korea. drmslee@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Schizophrenia
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 659  
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Author Fassoulaki, A.; Paraskeva, A.; Patris, K.; Pourgiezi, T.; Kostopanagiotou, G. openurl 
  Title Pressure applied on the extra 1 acupuncture point reduces bispectral index values and stress in volunteers Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Anesth Analg Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages 885-90, table of content  
  Keywords Healthy Subjects; Rct; Cross-Over Design; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus Sham; Acupressure; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract We investigated the effect of pressure application on the acupuncture point “extra 1” and on a control point on the bispectral index (BIS) values and on stress in 25 volunteers. In each volunteer, pressure was applied on the extra 1 point for 10 min and on a control point for 5 min on different days and in a randomized manner. The BIS value was recorded before applying pressure on the extra 1 point, during pressure application every 30 s for 10 min, and after pressure release. Regarding the control point, BIS values were recorded for 5 instead of 10 min during pressure application because acupressure on that point was associated with an unpleasant feeling. Each volunteer was asked to score stress before and after pressure application from 0 to 10. The BIS values were significantly reduced 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 min during pressure application on the extra 1 point (P < 0.001 for each comparison, respectively) and returned to the baseline values after pressure release. Pressure application on the control point decreased BIS values (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 at 2.5 and 5 min, respectively). However, these values were maintained close to 90% and were significantly higher than those obtained during pressure on the extra 1 point (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 for the 2.5- and 5-min comparisons). The verbal sedation score values obtained after pressure application on the extra 1 point were also lower when compared with the values obtained after pressure application on the control point (P < 0.001). IMPLICATIONS: This crossover study investigated the effect of pressure application on the acupuncture “extra 1” point in healthy volunteers. Acupressure applied for 10 min on the extra 1 point significantly reduced the BIS values and the verbal stress score when compared with acupressure applied on a control point.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Athens, Greece. afassoul@otenet.gr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 25  
  Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 9/22/2015; Date Modified: 9/22/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Stress, Psychological; Department of Anesthesiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Athens, Greece. afassoul@otenet.gr; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12598279 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1499  
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