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Author Witt, C. M.; Ludtke, R.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Physician characteristics and variation in treatment outcomes: are better qualified and experienced physicians more successful in treating patients with chronic pain with acupuncture? Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume 11 Issue 5 Pages 431-435  
  Keywords RCT; Pain; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Physician Characteristics; Physician Experience; AcuTrials  
  Abstract The aim of this paper was to quantify the influence of the physician's training and experience in the field of acupuncture on the outcome in patients with chronic pain. Patients visiting their physician because of chronic low back pain, headache, pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, or neck pain, were included in 4 multicenter, randomized, controlled studies. All patients received routine care; patients in the acupuncture groups received additional acupuncture treatment (on average 10 sessions). The data was pooled, and the 3-month change from baseline of the SF-36 bodily pain subscale as the main outcome defined. A total of 9,990 patients (mean age 49.6 +/- 13.6 years, 68% female) treated by 2,781 physicians (mean age 46.3 +/- 7 years, 37% female) were analyzed. The physicians had 7.3 +/- 5.2 (mean +/- sd) years of experience in acupuncture and their mean duration of formal acupuncture training had been 287 +/- 321 hours. The outcome was markedly improved in the acupuncture group. We identified only 1 physician characteristic with a significant influence on the outcome: Internists performed better (odds ratio OR = 1.49, confidence interval CI: 1.01;2.18; P = .043); orthopedists worse (OR = .79, CI: .62;1; P = .043) than the average physician. Neither the duration of training nor the duration of experience had any impact on the extent of the acupuncture effect. PERSPECTIVE: In this analysis, physician characteristics such as training did not influence patients' outcome after acupuncture, suggesting that formal training parameters have only a limited influence on treatment effect. Other skills such as the therapeutic relationship, which are difficult to measure, may probably play a more important role and should be taken into consideration.  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. claudia.witt@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants (down) 9990  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1312  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Brinkhaus, B.; Liecker, B.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for patients with chronic neck pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 125 Issue 1-2 Pages 98-106  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Neck Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract Acupuncture is widely used by patients with neck pain, but there is a lack of information about its effectiveness in routine medical care. The aim was to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain compared to treatment with routine care alone. We performed a randomized controlled multicentre trial plus non-randomized cohort in general practices in Germany. 14,161 patients with chronic neck pain (duration >6 months). Patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group or a control group receiving no acupuncture. Patients in the acupuncture group received up to 15 acupuncture sessions over three months. Patients who did not consent to randomization received acupuncture treatment. All subjects were allowed to receive usual medical care in addition to study treatment. Neck pain and disability (NPAD Scale by Wheeler) after three months. Of 14,161 patients (mean age 50.9+/-13.1 years, 68% female) 1880 were randomized to acupuncture and 1886 to control, and 10,395 included into the non-randomized acupuncture group. At three months, neck pain and disability improved by 16.2 (SE: 0.4) to 38.3 (SE: 0.4); and by 3.9 (SE: 0.4) to 50.5 (SE: 0.4), difference 12.3 (p<0.001) in the acupuncture and control group, respectively. Treatment success was essentially maintained through six months. Non-randomized patients had more severe symptoms at baseline and showed higher neck pain and disability improvement compared to randomized patients. Treatment with acupuncture added to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain was associated with improvements in neck pain and disability compared to treatment with routine care alone  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. claudia.witt@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants (down) 3766  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 79  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1310  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Brinkhaus, B.; Liecker, B.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip: a randomized, controlled trial with an additional nonrandomized arm Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum  
  Volume 54 Issue 11 Pages 3485-3493  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Osteoarthritis, Hip; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care, compared with routine care alone, in the treatment of patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. METHODS: In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with chronic pain due to OA of the knee or hip were randomly allocated to undergo up to 15 sessions of acupuncture in a 3-month period or to a control group receiving no acupuncture. Another group of patients who did not consent to randomization underwent acupuncture treatment. All patients were allowed to receive usual medical care in addition to the study treatment. Clinical OA severity (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC]) and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36) were assessed at baseline and after 3 months and 6 months. RESULTS: Of 3,633 patients (mean +/- SD age 61.8 +/- 10.8 years; 61% female), 357 were randomized to the acupuncture group and 355 to the control group, and 2,921 were included in the nonrandomized acupuncture group. At 3 months, the WOMAC had improved by a mean +/- SEM of 17.6 +/- 1.0 in the acupuncture group and 0.9 +/- 1.0 in the control group (3-month scores 30.5 +/- 1.0 and 47.3 +/- 1.0, respectively [difference in improvement 16.7 +/- 1.4; P < 0.001]). Similarly, quality of life improvements were more pronounced in the acupuncture group versus the control group (P < 0.001). Treatment success was maintained through 6 months. The changes in outcome in nonrandomized patients were comparable with those in randomized patients who received acupuncture. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that acupuncture plus routine care is associated with marked clinical improvement in patients with chronic OA-associated pain of the knee or hip  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, 10098 Berlin, Germany. claudia.witt@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 3633  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score 65  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1309  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Willich, S. N.; Reinhold, T.; Selim, D.; Jena, S.; Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M. url  openurl
  Title Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic neck pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 125 Issue 1-2 Pages 107-113  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Cost Effectiveness; Neck Pain; Pain; RCT; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Acupuncture is increasingly used in patients with chronic pain, but there is a lack of evidence on the cost-benefit relationship of this treatment strategy. The objective of this study was to assess costs and cost-effectiveness of additional acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic neck pain compared to patients receiving routine care alone. A randomized controlled trial including patients (18 years of age) with chronic neck pain (>6 months) was carried out. We assessed the resource use and health related quality of life (SF-36) at baseline and after 3 months using complete social health insurance funds and standardized questionnaires, respectively. The main outcome parameters were direct and indirect cost differences during the 3 months study period and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of acupuncture treatment. A total of 3,451 patients (1,753 acupuncture-group, 1,698 control-group) were randomized (31% men, age 53.5+/-12.9 years; 69% women, 49.2+/-12.7 years). Acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly higher costs over the 3 months study duration compared to routine care (925.53+/-1,551.06 euros vs. 648.06+/-1,459.13 euros; mean difference: 277.47 euros [95% CI: 175.71 euros-379.23 euros]). This cost increase was mainly due to costs of acupuncture (361.76+/-90.16 euros). The ICER was 12,469 euros per QALY gained and proved robust in additional sensitivity analyses. Since health insurance databases were used, private medical expenses such as over the counter medication were not included. Beyond the 3 months study duration, acupuncture might be associated with further health economic effects. According to international cost-effectiveness threshold values, acupuncture is a cost-effective treatment strategy in patients with chronic neck pain  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. stefan.willich@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants (down) 3451  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1308  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Selim, D.; Brinkhaus, B.; Reinhold, T.; Wruck, K.; Liecker, B.; Linde, K.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Pragmatic Randomized Trial Evaluating the Clinical and Economic Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 134 Issue 5 Pages 487-496  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Cost Effectiveness; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract In a randomized controlled trial plus a nonrandomized cohort, the authors investigated the effectiveness and costs of acupuncture in addition to routine care in the treatment of chronic low back pain and assessed whether the effects of acupuncture differed in randomized and nonrandomized patients. In 2001, German patients with chronic low back pain were allocated to an acupuncture group or a no-acupuncture control group. Persons who did not consent to randomization were included in a nonrandomized acupuncture group. All patients were allowed to receive routine medical care in addition to study treatment. Back function (Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire), pain, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 6 months, and cost-effectiveness was analyzed. Of 11,630 patients (mean age = 52.9 years (standard deviation, 13.7); 59% female), 1,549 were randomized to the acupuncture group and 1,544 to the control group; 8,537 were included in the nonrandomized acupuncture group. At 3 months, back function improved by 12.1 (standard error (SE), 0.4) to 74.5 (SE, 0.4) points in the acupuncture group and by 2.7 (SE, 0.4) to 65.1 (SE, 0.4) points among controls (difference = 9.4 points (95% confidence interval 8.3, 10.5); p < 0.001). Nonrandomized patients had more severe symptoms at baseline and showed improvements in back function similar to those seen in randomized patients. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was {euro}10,526 (euros) per quality-adjusted life year. Acupuncture plus routine care was associated with marked clinical improvements in these patients and was relatively cost-effective  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants (down) 3093  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score 79  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1311  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Haake, M.; Muller, H. H.; Schade-Brittinger, C.; Basler, H. D.; Schafer, H.; Maier, C.; Endres, H. G.; Trampisch, H. J.; Molsberger, A. url  openurl
  Title German Acupuncture Trials (GERAC) for Chronic Low Back Pain: Randomized, Multicenter, Blinded, Parallel-Group Trial With 3 Groups Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 167 Issue 17 Pages 1892-1898  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Low Back Pain, Chronic  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, verum acupuncture has never been directly compared with sham acupuncture and guideline-based conventional therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: A patient- and observer-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted in Germany involving 340 outpatient practices, including 1162 patients aged 18 to 86 years (mean +/- SD age, 50 +/- 15 years) with a history of chronic low back pain for a mean of 8 years. Patients underwent ten 30-minute sessions, generally 2 sessions per week, of verum acupuncture (n = 387) according to principles of traditional Chinese medicine; sham acupuncture (n = 387) consisting of superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; or conventional therapy, a combination of drugs, physical therapy, and exercise (n = 388). Five additional sessions were offered to patients who had a partial response to treatment (10%-50% reduction in pain intensity). Primary outcome was response after 6 months, defined as 33% improvement or better on 3 pain-related items on the Von Korff Chronic Pain Grade Scale questionnaire or 12% improvement or better on the back-specific Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire. Patients who were unblinded or had recourse to other than permitted concomitant therapies during follow-up were classified as nonresponders regardless of symptom improvement. RESULTS: At 6 months, response rate was 47.6% in the verum acupuncture group, 44.2% in the sham acupuncture group, and 27.4% in the conventional therapy group. Differences among groups were as follows: verum vs sham, 3.4% (95% confidence interval, -3.7% to 10.3%; P = .39); verum vs conventional therapy, 20.2% (95% confidence interval, 13.4% to 26.7%; P < .001); and sham vs conventional therapy, 16.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1% to 23.4%; P < .001. CONCLUSIONS: Low back pain improved after acupuncture treatment for at least 6 months. Effectiveness of acupuncture, either verum or sham, was almost twice that of conventional therapy  
  Address Department of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, Universitatsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum, Germany. heinz.endres@ruhr-uni-bochum.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 1162  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Z.; Yan, S.; Wu, J.; He, L.; Li, N.; Dong, G.; Fang, J.; Fu, W.; Fu, L.; Sun, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Z.; Ai, Y.; Zhou, K.; Liu, J.; Xu, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Chronic Severe Functional Constipation: A Randomized Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2016 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 165 Issue 11 Pages 761-769  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acu Versus Sham; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used for chronic constipation, but evidence for its effectiveness remains scarce. Objective: To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). Design: Randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726504). Setting: 15 hospitals in China. Participants: Patients with CSFC and no serious underlying pathologic cause for constipation. Intervention: 28 sessions of EA at traditional acupoints or sham EA (SA) at nonacupoints over 8 weeks. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change from baseline in mean weekly complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBMs) during weeks 1 to 8. Participants were followed until week 20. Results: 1075 patients (536 and 539 in the EA and SA groups, respectively) were enrolled. The increase from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 1 to 8 was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.61 to 1.89) in the EA group and 0.87 (CI, 0.73 to 0.97) in the SA group (between-group difference, 0.90 [CI, 0.74 to 1.10]; P < 0.001). The change from baseline in mean weekly CSBMs during weeks 9 to 20 was 1.96 (CI, 1.78 to 2.11) in the EA group and 0.89 (CI, 0.69 to 0.95) in the SA group (between-group difference, 1.09 [CI, 0.94 to 1.31]; P < 0.001). The proportion of patients having 3 or more mean weekly CSBMs in the EA group was 31.3% and 37.7% over the treatment and follow-up periods, respectively, compared with 12.1% and 14.1% in the SA group (P < 0.001). Acupuncture-related adverse events during treatment were infrequent in both groups, and all were mild or transient. Limitations: Longer-term follow-up was not assessed. Acupuncturists could not be blinded. Conclusion: Eight weeks of EA increases CSBMs and is safe for the treatment of CSFC. Additional study is warranted to evaluate a longer-term treatment and follow-up. Primary Funding Source: Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China through the Twelfth Five-Year National Science and Technology Pillar Program.  
  Address From Guang'anmen Hospital, Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Capital Medical University, Dongzhimen Hospital of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Huguosi Hospital of Chinese Medicine of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing; West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan; Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang; Guangdong Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong; The First Affiliated Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin; Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu; Heilongjiang Province Academy of Chinese Medical Science, Ha'erbin, Heilongjiang; The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui; Wuhan Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medical Hospital, Hubei Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei, China; and Daemen College, Physical Therapy Wound Care Clinic, Amherst, New York  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants (down) 1075  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Constipation
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27618593 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2182  
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Author Scharf, H. P.; Mansmann, U.; Streitberger, K.; Witte, S.; Kramer, J.; Maier, C.; Trampisch, H. J.; Victor, N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and knee osteoarthritis: a three-armed randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 145 Issue 1 Pages 12-20  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Penetrating Sham; Osteoarthritis, Knee; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Despite the popularity of acupuncture, evidence of its efficacy for reducing pain remains equivocal. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA) compared with sham acupuncture (needling at defined nonacupuncture points) and conservative therapy in patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: 315 primary care practices staffed by 320 practitioners with at least 2 years' experience in acupuncture. PATIENTS: 1007 patients who had had chronic pain for at least 6 months due to osteoarthritis of the knee (American College of Rheumatology [ACR] criteria and Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2 or 3). Interventions: Up to 6 physiotherapy sessions and as-needed anti-inflammatory drugs plus 10 sessions of TCA, 10 sessions of sham acupuncture, or 10 physician visits within 6 weeks. Patients could request up to 5 additional sessions or visits if the initial treatment was viewed as being partially successful. MEASUREMENTS: Success rate, as defined by at least 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 26 weeks. Additional end points were WOMAC score and global patient assessment. RESULTS: Success rates were 53.1% for TCA, 51.0% for sham acupuncture, and 29.1% for conservative therapy. Acupuncture groups had higher success rates than conservative therapy groups (relative risk for TCA compared with conservative therapy, 1.75 [95% CI, 1.43 to 2.13]; relative risk for sham acupuncture compared with conservative therapy, 1.73 [CI, 1.42 to 2.11]). There was no difference between TCA and sham acupuncture (relative risk, 1.01 [CI, 0.87 to 1.17]). LIMITATIONS: There was no blinding between acupuncture and traditional therapy and no monitoring of acupuncture compliance with study protocol. In general, practitioner-patient contacts were less intense in the conservative therapy group than in the TCA and sham acupuncture groups. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with physiotherapy and as-needed anti-inflammatory drugs, addition of either TCA or sham acupuncture led to greater improvement in WOMAC score at 26 weeks. No statistically significant difference was observed between TCA and sham acupuncture, suggesting that the observed differences could be due to placebo effects, differences in intensity of provider contact, or a physiologic effect of needling regardless of whether it is done according to TCA principles  
  Address University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 1007  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score 90  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1020  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Paoletti, C.; Benhamou, S. url  openurl
  Title Smoking cessation rates 4 years after treatment by nicotine gum and acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Preventive medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Med  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 25-28  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Combined Modality Therapy; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Smoking Cessation; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study was done to estimate the smoking cessation rates 4 years after treatment with acupuncture and nicotine gum. METHODS: Participants were randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to four groups: double active treatments (nicotine gum and acupuncture), double placebo, and the combination of one active treatment and placebo. RESULTS: The success rates were quite similar in the four groups at the different points of follow-up. They sharply decreased between 1 month (around 23%) and 1 year (around 10%). The decrease slowed down thereafter to around 6% at 4 years. CONCLUSIONS: Results from our study suggest that the two treatments did not offer any long-term improvement over placebo. Additional investigations are necessary to estimate the magnitude of their long-term success rate  
  Address Unite de Recherche en Epidemiologie des Cancers (U351), Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 208 Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants (down) 996  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 199  
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Author Brinkhaus, B.; Witt, C. M.; Jena, S.; Liecker, B.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with allergic rhinitis: a pragmatic randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Annals of allergy, asthma, and immunology Abbreviated Journal Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol  
  Volume 101 Issue 5 Pages 535-543  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Rhinitis, Allergic; Allergies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Unspecified Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is widely used in patients with allergic rhinitis, but the available evidence of its effectiveness is insufficient. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with allergic rhinitis compared with treatment with routine care alone. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial, patients with allergic rhinitis were randomly allocated to receive up to 15 acupuncture sessions during a period of 3 months or to a control group receiving no acupuncture. Patients who did not consent to random assignment received acupuncture treatment. All patients were allowed to receive usual medical care. The Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) and general health-related quality of life (36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Of 5,237 patients (mean [SD] age, 40 [12] years; 62% women), 487 were randomly assigned to acupuncture and 494 to control, and 4,256 were included in the nonrandomized acupuncture group. At 3 months, the RQLQ improved by a mean (SE) of 1.48 (0.06) in the acupuncture group and by 0.50 (0.06) in the control group (3-month scores, 1.44 [0.06] and 2.42 [0.06], respectively; difference in improvement, 0.98 [0.08]; P < .001). Similarly, quality-of-life improvements were more pronounced in the acupuncture vs the control group (P < .001). Six-month improvements in both acupuncture groups were lower than they had been at 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this trial suggest that treating patients with allergic rhinitis in routine care with additional acupuncture leads to clinically relevant and persistent benefits. In addition, it seems that physician characteristics play a minor role in the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment, although this idea needs further investigation  
  Address Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. benno.brinkhaus@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants (down) 981  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 91  
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Author Diener, H. C.; Kronfeld, K.; Boewing, G.; Lungenhausen, M.; Maier, C.; Molsberger, A.; Tegenthoff, M.; Trampisch, H. J.; Zenz, M.; Meinert, R. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for the prophylaxis of migraine: a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication The Lancet. Neurology Abbreviated Journal Lancet Neurol  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 310-316  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the efficacy of a part-standardised verum acupuncture procedure, in accordance with the rules of traditional Chinese medicine, compared with that of part-standardised sham acupuncture and standard migraine prophylaxis with beta blockers, calcium-channel blockers, or antiepileptic drugs in the reduction of migraine days 26 weeks after the start of treatment. METHODS: This study was a prospective, randomised, multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group, controlled, clinical trial, undertaken between April 2002 and July 2005. Patients who had two to six migraine attacks per month were randomly assigned verum acupuncture (n=313), sham acupuncture (n=339), or standard therapy (n=308). Patients received ten sessions of acupuncture treatment in 6 weeks or continuous prophylaxis with drugs. Primary outcome was the difference in migraine days between 4 weeks before randomisation and weeks 23-26 after randomisation. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN52683557. FINDINGS: Of 1295 patients screened, 960 were randomly assigned to a treatment group. Immediately after randomisation, 125 patients (106 from the standard group) withdrew their consent to study participation. 794 patients were analysed in the intention-to-treat popoulation and 443 in the per-protocol population. The primary outcome showed a mean reduction of 2 .3 days (95% CI 1.9-2.7) in the verum acupuncture group, 1.5 days (1.1-2.0) in the sham acupuncture group, and 2.1 days (1.5-2.7) in the standard therapy group. These differences were statistically significant compared with baseline (p<0.0001), but not across the treatment groups (p=0.09). The proportion of responders, defined as patients with a reduction of migraine days by at least 50%, 26 weeks after randomisation, was 47% in the verum group, 39% in the sham acupuncture group, and 40% in the standard group (p=0.133). INTERPRETATION: Treatment outcomes for migraine do not differ between patients treated with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture, or standard therapy  
  Address Department of Neurology, University Essen, Essen, Germany. h.diener@uni-essen.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 960  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 96  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 245  
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Author Li, Y. q.; Wang, X. x.; Bo, L. y. openurl 
  Title Swift Needling of Zusanli and Changqiang in Treating Infantile Diarrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 187-189  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Diarrhea; Diarrhea, Infantile; Enteritis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Pediatrics; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 930  
  Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Diarrhea, Infantile
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 692  
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Author Zhang, S.; Wu, B.; Liu, M.; Li, N.; Zeng, X.; Liu, H.; Yang, Q.; Han, Z.; Rao, P.; Wang, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture efficacy on ischemic stroke recovery: multicenter randomized controlled trial in china Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Stroke Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1301-1306  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Stroke; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Hemiplegia; Ischemic Stroke  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acupuncture is a frequently used complementary treatment for ischemic stroke in China but the evidence available from previous randomized trials is inconclusive. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in a more robustly designed larger scale trial. METHODS: This is a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Eight hundred sixty-two hospitalized patients with limb paralysis between 3 to 10 days after ischemic stroke onset were allocated acupuncture plus standard care or standard care alone. The acupuncture was applied 5 times per week for 3 to 4 weeks. The primary outcomes were defined as follows: (1) death/disability according to Barthel index and (2) death/institutional care at 6 months. RESULTS: There was a tendency of fewer patients being dead or dependent in acupuncture group (80/385, 20.7%) than in control group (102/396, 25.8%) at 6 months (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.05). The benefit was noted in subgroup receiving >/=10 sessions of acupuncture (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.98). There was no statistical difference in death or institutional care between the 2 groups (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.79). Severe adverse events occurred in 7.6% and 8.3% of patients in the 2 groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture seemed to be safe in the subacute phase of ischemic stroke. If the potential benefits observed are confirmed in future larger study, the health gain from wider use of the treatment could be substantial.  
  Address Department of Neurology (S.Z., B.W., M.L.) and Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (N.L.), West China Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China.  
  Publisher (c) 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments 18  
  Treatment Follow-up 27.5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 862  
  Time in Treatment 3.5 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/23/2015; Date Modified: 7/7/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; From the Department of Neurology (S.Z., B.W., M.L.) and Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (N.L.), West China Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25873601 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1599  
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Author MacPherson, H.; Richmond, S.; Bland, M.; Brealey, S.; Gabe, R.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Perren, S.; Sculpher, M.; Spackman, E.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and counselling for depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS medicine Abbreviated Journal PLoS Med  
  Volume 10 Issue 9 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Counseling; Usual Care Control, Multimodality  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is a significant cause of morbidity. Many patients have communicated an interest in non-pharmacological therapies to their general practitioners. Systematic reviews of acupuncture and counselling for depression in primary care have identified limited evidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate acupuncture versus usual care and counselling versus usual care for patients who continue to experience depression in primary care. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a randomised controlled trial, 755 patients with depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II score >/= 20) were recruited from 27 primary care practices in the North of England. Patients were randomised to one of three arms using a ratio of 2.2.1 to acupuncture (302), counselling (302), and usual care alone (151). The primary outcome was the difference in mean Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) scores at 3 months with secondary analyses over 12 months follow-up. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. PHQ-9 data were available for 614 patients at 3 months and 572 patients at 12 months. Patients attended a mean of ten sessions for acupuncture and nine sessions for counselling. Compared to usual care, there was a statistically significant reduction in mean PHQ-9 depression scores at 3 months for acupuncture (-2.46, 95% CI -3.72 to -1.21) and counselling (-1.73, 95% CI -3.00 to -0.45), and over 12 months for acupuncture (-1.55, 95% CI -2.41 to -0.70) and counselling (-1.50, 95% CI -2.43 to -0.58). Differences between acupuncture and counselling were not significant. In terms of limitations, the trial was not designed to separate out specific from non-specific effects. No serious treatment-related adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomised controlled trial of acupuncture and counselling for patients presenting with depression, after having consulted their general practitioner in primary care, both interventions were associated with significantly reduced depression at 3 months when compared to usual care alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN63787732 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 36 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants (down) 755  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 802  
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Author Ma, T. T.; Yu, S. Y.; Li, Y.; Liang, F. R.; Tian, X. P.; Zheng, H.; Yan, J.; Sun, G. J.; Chang, X. R.; Zhao, L.; Wu, X.; Zeng, F. url  openurl
  Title Randomised clinical trial: an assessment of acupuncture on specific meridian or specific acupoint vs. sham acupuncture for treating functional dyspepsia. Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics Abbreviated Journal Aliment Pharmacol Ther  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 552-561  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Dyspepsia; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common disease without an established optimal treatment. AIM: To determine (i) the effect of acupuncture in relieving FD symptoms and improving life quality; (ii) the effect difference between acupoint and non-acupoint; and (iii) the effect difference among different acupoints. METHODS: A total of 712 eligible patients were included and randomly assigned to six groups (Group A: specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group B: non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group C: specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; Group D: specific acupoints of the gallbladder meridian; Group E: sham acupuncture of non-acupoints; and Group F: itopride). A treatment period of 4 weeks (continuous five sessions per week), and a follow-up period of 12 weeks were arranged. The outcomes were the (i) patients' response, (ii) symptoms improvement measured using the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia and (iii) quality-of-life improvement based on Nepean Dyspepsia Index. RESULTS: All groups had an improvement in dyspepsia symptoms and the QoL at the end of treatment, and the improvement was sustained for 4 weeks and 12 weeks. The overall response rate was significantly higher in acupuncture group A (70.69%), and lower in sham acupuncture group (34.75%), compared with itopride and other acupuncture groups. Similarly, the difference in symptoms and QoL improvement was significant between group A and the other acupuncture groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is effective in the treatment of functional dyspepsia, and is superior to non-acupoint puncture. The benefit of acupuncture relies on acupoint specificity.  
  Address Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 712  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dyspepsia
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 790  
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Author Clavel, F.; Benhamou, S.; Company, H. uertas.; Flamant, R. url  openurl
  Title Helping people to stop smoking: randomised comparison of groups being treated with acupuncture and nicotine gum with control group Type of Study RCT
  Year 1985 Publication British medical journal Abbreviated Journal Br Med J (Clin Res Ed)  
  Volume 291 Issue 6508 Pages 1538-1539  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Smoking Cessation; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Substance-Related Disorders; Tobacco Use Disorder; TCM Acupuncture Style; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants (down) 651  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 198  
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Author Witt, C. M.; Reinhold, T.; Brinkhaus, B.; Roll, S.; Jena, S.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with dysmenorrhea: a randomized study on clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in usual care Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Obste  
  Volume 198 Issue 2 Pages 166-168  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Cost Effectiveness; Dysmenorrhea; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Menstruation Disturbances  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of acupuncture in patients with dysmenorrhea. STUDY DESIGN: In a randomized controlled trial plus non-randomized cohort, patients with dysmenorrhea were randomized to acupuncture (15 sessions over three months) or to a control group (no acupuncture). Patients who declined randomization received acupuncture treatment. All subjects were allowed to receive usual medical care. RESULTS: Of 649 women (mean age 36.1 +/- 7.1 years), 201 were randomized. After three months, the average pain intensity (NRS 0-10) was lower in the acupuncture compared to the control group: 3.1 (95% CI 2.7; 3.6) vs. 5.4 (4.9; 5.9), difference -2.3 (-2.9; -1.6); P<.001. The acupuncture group had better quality of life and higher costs. (overall ICER 3,011 euros per QALY). CONCLUSION: Additional acupuncture in patients with dysmenorrhea was associated with improvements in pain and quality of life as compared to treatment with usual care alone and was cost-effective within usual thresholds  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany. claudia.witt@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 649  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1313  
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Author Cherkin, D. C.; Sherman, K. J.; Avins, A. L.; Erro, J. H.; Ichikawa, L.; Barlow, W. E.; Delaney, K.; Hawkes, R.; Hamilton, L.; Pressman, A.; Khalsa, P. S.; Deyo, R. A. url  openurl
  Title A randomized trial comparing acupuncture, simulated acupuncture, and usual care for chronic low back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 169 Issue 9 Pages 858-866  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a popular complementary and alternative treatment for chronic back pain. Recent European trials suggest similar short-term benefits from real and sham acupuncture needling. This trial addresses the importance of needle placement and skin penetration in eliciting acupuncture effects for patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: A total of 638 adults with chronic mechanical low back pain were randomized to individualized acupuncture, standardized acupuncture, simulated acupuncture, or usual care. Ten treatments were provided over 7 weeks by experienced acupuncturists. The primary outcomes were back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score; range, 0-23) and symptom bothersomeness (0-10 scale). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 8, 26, and 52 weeks. RESULTS: At 8 weeks, mean dysfunction scores for the individualized, standardized, and simulated acupuncture groups improved by 4.4, 4.5, and 4.4 points, respectively, compared with 2.1 points for those receiving usual care (P < .001). Participants receiving real or simulated acupuncture were more likely than those receiving usual care to experience clinically meaningful improvements on the dysfunction scale (60% vs 39%; P < .001). Symptoms improved by 1.6 to 1.9 points in the treatment groups compared with 0.7 points in the usual care group (P < .001). After 1 year, participants in the treatment groups were more likely than those receiving usual care to experience clinically meaningful improvements in dysfunction (59% to 65% vs 50%, respectively; P = .02) but not in symptoms (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Although acupuncture was found effective for chronic low back pain, tailoring needling sites to each patient and penetration of the skin appear to be unimportant in eliciting therapeutic benefits. These findings raise questions about acupuncture's purported mechanisms of action. It remains unclear whether acupuncture or our simulated method of acupuncture provide physiologically important stimulation or represent placebo or nonspecific effects  
  Address Center for Health Studies, 1730 Minor Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. cherkin.d@ghc.org  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 45 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 638  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 162  
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Author Andersen, D.; Lossl, K.; Nyboe Andersen, A.; Furbringer, J.; Bach, H.; Simonsen, J.; Larsen, E. C. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer: a randomized controlled trial of 635 patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Reproductive biomedicine online Abbreviated Journal Reprod Biomed Online  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 366-372  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; Embryo Transfer; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract This prospective, randomized, controlled and double-blinded trial studied whether acupuncture in relation to embryo transfer could increase the ongoing pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy. A total of 635 patients undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were included. In 314 patients, embryo transfer was accompanied by acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. In the control group, 321 patients received placebo acupuncture using a validated placebo needle. In the acupuncture group and the placebo group, the ongoing pregnancy rates were 27% (95% CI 22-32) and 32% (95% CI 27-37), respectively. Live birth rates were 25% (95% CI 20-30) in the acupuncture group and 30% (95% CI 25-30) in the placebo group. The differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that acupuncture administered in relation to embryo transfer has no effect on the outcome of IVF and ICSI.  
  Address The Fertility Clinics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 635  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Embryo Transfer
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 29  
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Author Guo, J. url  openurl
  Title Chronic fatigue syndrome treated by acupuncture and moxibustion in combination with psychological approaches in 310 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 92-95  
  Keywords Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Chronic Fatigue; Nervous System Diseases; Herbal Formula; Moxibustion; RCT; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe clinical therapeutic effect of acupuncture and moxibustion combined with a psychological approach on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHODS: The treatment was given by acupuncture plus moxibustion combined with a psychological approach based on differentiation of symptoms and signs in 310 cases. RESULTS: Of 310 cases observed, 275 cases (88.7%) were clinically cured, 28 cases (9%) improved, and 7 cases (2.3%) failed. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture plus moxibustion combined with a psychological approach is an effective therapy for CFS  
  Address Hospital of Chengdu Jiuxing Company of Textile Group, Chengdu 610053, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 104 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants (down) 620  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 404  
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