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Author Acar, H. V.; Cuvas, O.; Ceyhan, A.; Ceyhan, A.; Dikmen, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture on Yintang point decreases preoperative anxiety Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 420-424  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Preoperative Anxiety; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ear-press needle acupuncture on Yintang point for preoperative anxiety. Design: This was a prospective, randomized, single-blind, controlled study. Settings/location: The study setting was the Department of Anesthesiology in Ankara Training and Research Hospital of Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey. Subjects: The study comprised 52 adult surgical patients. Interventions: A single, 20-minute session of single-point acupuncture was applied on Yintang (acupuncture group) or sham point (sham acupuncture group). Outcome measures: The efficacy of acupuncture was evaluated by means of the changes in bispectral index (BIS) and STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Index). Results: BIS values in the acupuncture group were significantly lower than in the sham group in all time intervals (p<0.0042). BIS values were lower than baseline in the study group during the entire study period (p<0.0004) while no such effect has been observed in the sham group (p>0.0004). Mean values of state anxiety (STAI-S) decreased after acupuncture in the study group (p=0,018), while no change was observed in trait anxiety (STAI-T) (p=0.156). Patients of the sham group showed no change in both parameters (p=0.387 and p=0,116). Conclusions: Ear-press needle acupuncture on Yintang point reduces preoperative anxiety in adult surgical patients.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Ankara Training and Research Hospital of Ministry of Health , Ankara, Turkey .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 52  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Preoperative Anxiety
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 2  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Acupuncture Research Resource Centre url  openurl
  Title Sports Injuries and Acupuncture: The Evidence for Effectiveness Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit Acupun  
  Volume 11 A2 Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Wounds and Injuries; Sports Medicine; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sports Medicine
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 3  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, A. C.; Bennani, T.; Freeman, R.; Hamdy, O.; Kaptchuk, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Two styles of acupuncture for treating painful diabetic neuropathy--a pilot randomised control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Diabetes Mellitus; Diabetic Neuropathies; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Neuropathy; Pain; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract In a pilot study, we evaluated the clinical and mechanistic effects of two styles of acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Japanese acupuncture, for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Out of seven patients enrolled, three received Traditional Chinese acupuncture while four received Japanese style acupuncture. Treatments were delivered once a week for 10 weeks. Acupuncturists were permitted to select the needle interventions. Substantial differences in diagnostic techniques, choice of acupuncture points, and needle manipulation were observed between TCM and Japanese acupuncturists. Clinically, patients allocated to Japanese acupuncture reported decreased neuropathy-associated pain according to the daily pain severity score, while the group allocated to the TCM acupuncture reported minimal effects. Both acupuncture styles, however, lowered pain according to the McGill Short Form Pain Score. The TCM style improved nerve sensation according to quantitative sensory testing while the Japanese style had a more equivocal effect. No evident changes were observed in glucose control or heart rate variability in either group  
  Address Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. aahn@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 7  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Diabetic Neuropathies
  Disease Category Diabetes Mellitus OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 5  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, C. B.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, J. C.; Fossion, J. P.; Sant'Ana, A. url  openurl
  Title A clinical pilot study comparing traditional acupuncture to combined acupuncture for treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 29-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Trigeminal Neuralgia; Nervous System Diseases; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Bell Palsy; Pilot Study; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Fossion Auricular Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract Traditional acupuncture (TA) and ear acupuncture (EA) are used for treatment of headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain. The purpose of this study is to develop effective treatment using combined acupuncture (CA) which consists of TA and EA and to set clinical protocols for future trials. Participants were divided into TA (n = 15) control and CA (n = 34) experimental groups. Obligatory points among Korean Five Element Acupuncture and optional individual points along with symptom points were used in the TA group. The CA group was exposed to ear points of Fossion and TA. Acupuncture treatment consisted of six mandatory sessions per patient over 3 weeks and extended to 12 sessions. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. We compared TA to CA and researched their relevant publications. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p = 0.968) which showed pain-alleviating tendency. Pain alleviation was significantly different after the fifth and sixth sessions (p = 0.021, p = 0.025), with headache being the most significantly relieved (F = 4.399, p = 0.018) among the diseases. When assessing pain intensity, both the Headache Impact Test and the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale should be adopted for headache and the fractal electroencephalography method be used in pain diseases. In the future, studies should consist of TA, EA, and CA groups; each group having 20 patients. Treatment number should to be no less than 10 sessions. Korean Five Element Acupuncture should be a compulsory inclusion along with individual points being optional inclusion in TA. EA could be selected from Nogier, Fossion and so forth. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment, whether TA or CA, showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain, but no significant difference was seen between groups. Prospective, well-controlled, and relevant protocols using multimodal strategies to define the role of TA, EA, and CA are needed.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, College of Oriental Medicine, Dongeui University, Busan, Korea. cbahn@deu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 6  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahonen, E.; Hakumaki, M.; Mahlamaki, S.; Partanen, J.; Riekkinen, P.; Sivenius, J. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture and physiotherapy on myogenic headache: a comparative study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1984 Publication Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Electrother Res  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 141-150  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Massage; Neck Pain; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tension-Type Headache; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract Twenty-two tension-neck and headache patients were divided into acupuncture and physiotherapy groups. The quantity of muscle tension (motor unit potential spikes per time unit) was estimated three times before the beginning of the therapy, four times during a therapy period of four weeks, and two times during the follow-up period of 28 weeks. Pain level was also estimated using a visual analogue scale. In both of the groups a significant reduction of muscle tension was observed during the therapy period. After a follow-up period of 28 weeks, there was still a significant reduction of EMG activity in both groups. Also, the subjective level of headache decreased in these groups during the therapy period, and it was also significantly lowered after 28 weeks of follow-up. It is concluded that either acupuncture therapy or physiotherapy relieves pain in tension-neck and headache patients  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 28 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 22  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 7  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ajori, L.; Nazari, L.; Eliaspour, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for initiation of labor: a double-blind randomized sham-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Archives of gynecology and obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gynecol Obstet  
  Volume 287 Issue 5 Pages 887-891  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Labor, Obstetric; Labor, Induced; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Initiation of Labor  
  Abstract PURPOSE: This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate whether use of acupuncture could initiate labor at term and thus reduce post-term induction. METHODS: Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 80 women at 38 weeks of gestation or greater were randomized to acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. Acupuncture points LI4, SP6 and BL67 were needled bilaterally. The primary outcome was initiation of labor. The time from acupuncture to delivery, mode of delivery, fetal and maternal outcome and Apgar scores were recorded. The trial is registered at irct.ir, number IRCT201111218151N1. RESULTS: Eighty women were randomized and 75 women completed the study procedure. Age, BMI, parity and gestational age were similar in both groups. Spontaneous labor was initiated in 94.7 % of acupuncture group and 89.2 % of sham acupuncture group (p = 0.430). There were no statistically significant difference between groups for time from enrollment to delivery (p = 0.06). CONCLUSION: According to this study, it seems that acupuncture was not effective in labor initiation compared to sham acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tajrish Sq, Tehran, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Labor Onset
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 8  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Akimoto, T.; Nakahori, C.; Aizawa, K.; Kimura, F.; Fukubayashi, T.; Kono, I. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and Responses of Immunologic and Endocrine Markers during Competition Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Medicine and science in sports and exercise Abbreviated Journal Med Sci Sports Exerc  
  Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages 1296-1302  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Athletes; Electroacupuncture; Exercise; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sports Medicine; TCM Acupuncture Style; Athletic Performance  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION Acupuncture is used to modulate the physical well-being of athletes in Asian countries. However, there is little information on the immediate effects of acupuncture treatment on physiological or psychological responses to exercise.PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture treatment on the physical well-being of elite female soccer players during a competition period.METHODS Subjects were divided into two groups: those who received acupuncture treatment (18.1 +/- 2.3 yr [+/-SD], N = 9) and a control group (17.7 +/- 2.8 yr, N = 12). In the treatment group, acupuncture stimulus was applied at LI 4 (Goukoku), ST 36 (Ashi-sanri) for 20 min, and ST 6 (Kyosya), LU 6 (Ko-sai) points for 15 min 4 h after the game every night during the competition period. The measured parameters included salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) level, cortisol level in saliva, subjective rating of physical well-being, and profile of mood states (POMS).RESULTS The following were the main results: 1) Exercise-induced decrease of salivary SIgA and increase of salivary cortisol were inhibited by acupuncture. 2) Acupuncture improved subjective rating of muscle tension and fatigue. 3) The POMS score was modulated by acupuncture.CONCLUSION These results support the effectiveness of acupuncture for physical and mental well-being of athletes  
  Address 1Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, JAPAN; 2Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Tokyo, JAPAN; and  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 21  
  Time in Treatment 3 Days Condition Athletic Performance
  Disease Category OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 9  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Al-Sadi, M.; Newman, B.; Julious, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Anesthesia Abbreviated Journal Anesthesia  
  Volume 52 Issue Pages 658-661  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 81  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 10  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alecrim-Andrade, J.; iel-Junior, J.; Cladellas, X.; Correa-Filho, H.; Machado, H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in migraine prophylaxis: a randomized sham-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 520-529  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract The purpose of the present trial was to evaluate semi-standardized acupuncture efficacy in migraine prophylaxis. Twenty-eight subjects with migraine were randomized to the real or sham acupuncture groups. Semi-standardized and standardized minimal acupuncture were used, respectively, in the two groups of patients. They were all treated with 16 acupuncture sessions in 12 weeks. Both groups exhibited similar reductions in: percentage of patients with reduction of migraine >/= 40% and >/= 50% regarding frequency of migraine attacks, days with migraine, frequency of migraine attacks, average duration of a migraine attack, rate of rescue medication used, average headache severity rate and other parameters compared with the baseline period. Associated symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting, also showed equal estimates in both groups. These findings showed that semi-standardized acupuncture shows no difference from sham acupuncture in preventing migraine attacks  
  Address Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Medicina Interna, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 77  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 11  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alecrim-Andrade, J.; Maciel-Junior, J. A.; Carne, X.; Vasconcelos, G. M.S.; Correa-Filho, H. R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in migraine prevention: a randomized sham controlled study with 6-months posttreatment follow-up Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 98-105  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Analgesia; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Migraine; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture in migraine prophylaxis. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients with migraine were enrolled in a randomized control trial at the Headache clinic located in a University Hospital. Real and sham acupuncture groups received 16 acupuncture sessions over 3 months. Treatment was individualized in the real acupuncture group and minimal acupuncture was used in the sham group. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with a >or=50% reduction in their migraine attack frequency in the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth (months) compared with the first one (baseline period). Primary and secondary end points were measured comparing headache diaries. RESULTS: Real acupuncture group showed improvement with significant differences compared with the sham acupuncture group in the primary efficacy end point (P=0.021) at the second month of the treatment. Differences also appeared in 2 secondary end points: number of days with migraine per month (P=0.007) in the second month and the percentage of patients with >or=40% reduction in migraine attack frequency in the first (P=0.044) and second months (P=0.004) of the treatment. These differences disappeared in the third (last) month of the treatment as a consequence of the high improvement of the sham acupuncture group. Comparisons within each group showed that several migraine parameters evaluated improved significantly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Individualized treatment based on traditional Chinese medicine plays a role in preventing migraine attacks. Nevertheless, sham acupuncture had similar effects. Major conclusions were limited by the small sample sizes however the observed trends may contribute to design future trials  
  Address Department of Medicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain. jalecrim@uol.com.br  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 37  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 12  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alexander, D. N.; Cen, S.; Sullivan, K. J.; Bhavnani, G.; Ma, X.; Azen, S. P. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture treatment on poststroke motor recovery and physical function: a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Neurorehabilitation and neural repair Abbreviated Journal Neurorehabil Neural Repair  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 259-267  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Stroke; AcuTrials; Motor Function; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Physical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract This pilot study obtained preliminary data on the effects of acupuncture treatment combined with a standard inpatient stroke rehabilitation program on poststroke motor recovery and physical function. Thirty-two patients with acute stroke were recruited and randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms: standard rehabilitation (control group) or a combination of acupuncture and standard rehabilitation (acupuncture group). Baseline and discharge assessments were obtained on motor recovery as measured by the Fugl-Meyer (FM) Assessment and on physical function as measured by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Comparisons were made between the acupuncture and control group in total FM and FIM as well as for each subscale of the FM and FIM. No differences between treatment groups were found in the total FM or the total FIM. However, statistically significant benefit due to acupuncture was observed for the FM lower extremity motor function subscale (P = 0.01) and the tub/shower transfer mobility subscale of the FIM (P = 0.03). Marginally significant benefit due to acupuncture was noted for the toilet transfer mobility subscale of the FIM (P = 0.09). The effectiveness of acupuncture as an adjunct to standard poststroke rehabilitation programs may be demonstrated when more specific measures of stroke motor recovery and physical function are used  
  Address Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital, Inglewood, CA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 32  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score 62  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 13  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alimi, D.; Rubino, C.; Pichard-Leandri, E. url  openurl
  Title Analgesic Effect of Auricular Acupuncture for Cancer Pain: A Randomized, Blinded, Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Oncol  
  Volume 21 Issue 22 Pages 4120-4126  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Other Acupuncture Style; Auricular Acupuncture; Cancer; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Ear Seeds; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; Neoplasms  
  Abstract PURPOSE: During the last 30 years, auricular acupuncture has been used as complementary treatment of cancer pain when analgesic drugs do not suffice. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of auricular acupuncture in decreasing pain intensity in cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ninety patients were randomly divided in three groups; one group received two courses of auricular acupuncture at points where an electrodermal signal had been detected, and two placebo groups received auricular acupuncture at points with no electrodermal signal (placebo points) and one with auricular seeds fixed at placebo points. Patients had to be in pain, attaining a visual analog score (VAS) of 30 mm or more after having received analgesic treatment adapted to both intensity and type of pain, for at least 1 month of therapy. Treatment efficacy was based on the absolute decrease in pain intensity measured 2 months after randomization using the VAS. RESULTS: The main outcome was pain assessed at 2 months, with the assessment at 1 month carried over to 2 months for the eight patients who interrupted treatment after 1 month. For three patients, no data were available because they withdrew from the study during the first month. Pain intensity decreased by 36% at 2 months from baseline in the group receiving acupuncture; there was little change for patients receiving placebo (2%). The difference between groups was statistically significant (P <.0001). CONCLUSION: The observed reduction in pain intensity measured on the VAS represents a clear benefit from auricular acupuncture for these cancer patients who are in pain, despite stable analgesic treatment  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score 80  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 14  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alizadeh, R.; Esmaeili, S.; Shoar, S.; Bagheri-Hariri, S.; Shoar, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting: efficacy of two acupuncture points versus a single one Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 71-75  
  Keywords RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Anesthesiology  
  Abstract Despite recent advances in anesthesiology and postoperative care, postoperative nausea and vomiting are common complaints. Although acupuncture techniques have received attention in anesthesiology, the ideal technique and selection of the most appropriate acupuncture points are still under debate. This study compared the efficacy of two simultaneous acupuncture points with that of a single point in the prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting following general anesthesia through a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 227 surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received acupuncture by stimulation only on the PC6 point (single group), and the second group underwent concomitant stimulation of the PC6 and the L14 acupuncture points (combined group) during surgery under general anesthesia. The prevalences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Of 115 patients in the combined group, 80 (69.6%) complained about nausea and vomiting compared with 96 (85.7%) in the single group, a significantly lower proportion (p<0.05). Our findings favor a combination of PC6 and LI4 stimulation for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 227  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 15  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; De Lorenzo, C.; Quirico, P. E. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture versus flunarizine in the prophylactic treatment of migraine without aura:a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 17 Issue Pages 442-443  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Migraine; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 16  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; De Lorenzo, C.; Quirico, P. E.; Airola, G.; Tolardo, G.; Mana, O.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the prophylactic treatment of migraine without aura: a comparison with flunarizine Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Headache Abbreviated Journal Headache  
  Volume 42 Issue 9 Pages 855-861  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Migraine; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract Objectives.-In a randomized controlled trial extending over 6 months, we evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture versus flunarizine in the prophylactic treatment of migraine without aura. Methods.-One hundred sixty women with migraines were randomly assigned to acupuncture treatment (group A, n = 80) or to an oral therapy with flunarizine (group F, n = 80). In group A, acupuncture was carried out in weekly sessions for the first 2 months and then once a month for the next 4 months. The same acupoints were used at each treatment: LR3 Taichong, SP6 Sanyinjiao, ST36 Zusanli, CV12 Zhongwan, LI4 Hegu, PC6 Neiguan, GB20 Fengchi, GB14 Yangbai, EX-HN5 Taiyang, GV20 Baihui. In group F, 10 mg flunarizine were given daily for the first 2 months and then for 20 days per month for the next 4 months. Results.-The frequency of attacks and use of symptomatic drugs significantly decreased during treatment in both groups. The number of attacks after 2 and 4 months of therapy was significantly lower in group A than in group F, and analgesic consumption was significantly lower in group A at 2 months of treatment. At 6 months no such differences existed between the two treatment groups. Pain intensity was significantly reduced only by acupuncture treatment. Side effects were significantly less frequent in group A. Conclusions.-Acupuncture proved to be adequate for migraine prophylaxis. Relative to flunarizine, acupuncture treatment exhibited greater effectiveness in the first months of therapy and superior tolerability  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 150  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 69  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 17  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; De Lorenzo, C.; Quirico, P. E.; Lupi, G.; Airola, G.; Mana, O.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Non-pharmacological approaches to chronic headaches: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, lasertherapy and acupuncture in transformed migraine treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 24 Issue Pages 138-142  
  Keywords TENS; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Laser Acupuncture; Migraine; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Headache Disorders; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract In an open, randomized trial, we evaluated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), infrared lasertherapy and acupuncture in the treatment of transformed migraine, over a 4-month period free of prophylactic drugs. Sixty women suffering from transformed migraine were assigned, after a one month run-in period, to three different treatments: TENS (Group T; n=20), infrared lasertherapy (Group L; n=20) or acupuncture (Group A; n=20). In each group the patients underwent ten sessions of treatment and monthly control visits. In Group T patients were treated for two weeks (5 days/week) simultaneously with three TENS units with different stimulation parameters (I: pulse rate = 80 Hz, pulse width = 120 &mgr;s; II: 120 Hz, 90 &mgr;s; III: 4 Hz, 200 &mgr;s). In Group L an infrared diode laser (27 mW, 904 nm) was applied every other day on tender scalp spots. In Group A acupuncture was carried out twice a week in the first two weeks and weekly in the next 6 weeks. A basic formula (LR3, SP6, LI4, GB20, GV20 and Ex-HN5) was always employed; additional points were selected according to each patient's symptomatology. The number of days with headache per month significantly decreased during treatment in all groups. The response in the groups differed over time, probably due to the different timing of applications of the three methods. TENS, lasertherapy and acupuncture proved to be effective in reducing the frequency of headache attacks. Acupuncture showed the best effectiveness over time  
  Address Woman's Headache Center, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Via Ventimiglia 3, I-10126 Turin, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 58  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 18  
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Author Allais, G.; Romoli, M.; Rolando, S.; Airola, G.; Castagnoli Gabellari, I.; Allais, R.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Ear acupuncture in the treatment of migraine attacks: a randomized trial on the efficacy of appropriate versus inappropriate acupoints Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 1/1/1970 Issue Pages S173-5  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Headache Disorders; Migraine; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Auricular Acupuncture; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Needle Contact Test; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Other Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ear acupuncture can be a useful mean for controlling migraine pain. It has been shown that a technique called the Needle Contact Test (NCT) can identify the most efficacious ear acupoints for reducing current migraine pain through just a few seconds of needle contact. The majority of the points were located on the antero-internal part of the antitragus (area M) on the same side of pain. The aim of this study was to verify the therapeutic value of area M and to compare it with an area of the ear (representation of the sciatic nerve, area S) which probably does not have a therapeutic effect on migraine attacks. We studied 94 females suffering from migraine without aura, diagnosed according to the ICHD-II criteria, during the attack. They were randomly subdivided into two groups: in group A, tender points located in area M, positive to NCT were inserted; in group B, the unsuitable area (S) was treated. Changes in pain intensity were measured using a VAS scale at various times of the study. During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of the VAS value in group A (Anova for repeated measures: p < 0.001), whereas no significance was observed in group B. VAS values were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after needle insertion. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.  
  Address Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Women's Headache Center, University of Turin, Via Ventimiglia 3, 10126 Turin, Italy. gb.allais@tiscali.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 19  
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Author Allen, J. J.; Schnyer, R. N.; Chambers, A. S.; Hitt, S. K.; Moreno, F. A.; Manber, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for depression: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication The Journal of clinical psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 67 Issue 11 Pages 1665-1673  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Wait-List Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture as an intervention for major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: Acupuncture was examined in 151 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The specific intervention involved Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)-style acupuncture with manual stimulation for depression; the control conditions consisted of (1) a nonspecific intervention using a comparable number of legitimate acupuncture points not specifically targeted to depressive symptoms and (2) a waitlist condition, which involved waiting without intervention for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, all patients received the depression-specific acupuncture. Each 8-week intervention regimen consisted of 12 acupuncture sessions delivered in an acupuncturist's office in the community. The primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. The study was conducted from February 1998 to April 2002. RESULTS: Twenty patients terminated treatment before the completion of the 8-week intervention (13%) but not differentially by study group. Random regression models of the intent-to-treat sample revealed that although patients receiving acupuncture improved more than those awaiting intervention, no evidence of differential efficacy of the depression-specific over nonspecific intervention was found. Response rates in acupuncture-treated patients were relatively low after 8 weeks (22% and 39% for specific and nonspecific intervention groups, respectively), with the response rate after the entire 16-week trial reaching 50%. CONCLUSION: Although TCM manual acupuncture is a well-tolerated intervention, results fail to support its efficacy as a monotherapy for MDD. It can't be ruled out that factors unique to the implementation of acupuncture in this research study may have limited the efficacy of interventions compared to those provided in naturalistic settings. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00010517  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721-0068, USA. jallen@u.arizona.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 151  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 77  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 20  
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Author Alraek, T.; Baerheim, A. url  openurl
  Title The effect of prophylactic acupuncture treatment in women with recurrent cystitis: kidney patients fare better Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 651-658  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Urologic Diseases; Cystitis; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; No Treatment Control; RCT; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how the effect of acupuncture treatment in recurrent cystitis relates to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnostic categories and physiologic measurements. SETTING/LOCATION: Two private acupuncture clinics in Bergen, Norway. Measurements were carried out in Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Ninety-eight (98) cystitis-prone women were randomly assigned to acupuncture treatment or no treatment. Main effect parameter was number of cystitis during 6 months observation time. Residual urine was measured with an automatic Bladder Scan 2500 (Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation, Bothell, WA) at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months. RESULTS: Twenty-two (22) patients had Spleen yang/qi xu (Sp), 18 Kidney yang/qi xu (Kid), and 18 Liver qi stagnation (Liv). Of the Kid group, 78% were free of cystitis (irrespective of bacteriuria) during the observation period compared to 45% in the Sp group, 44% in the Liv group (p < or = 0.05, Kid versus Sp and Liv), and 17% in the nontreated group (p < or = 0.01, versus all treated patients). One sixth as many episodes of acute cystitis occurred in the Kid group compared to the nontreated group (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-0.42, p < or = 0.001). Similarly, we found IRR = 0.49 (0.25-0.83) in the Sp group and IRR = 0.42 (0.21-0.80) in the Liv group. Subanalyzing for cystitis with detected bacteriuria yielded comparable results. Kid patients significantly reduced their residual urine from baseline to 6 months (36.4 mL versus 12.9 mL, p < or = 0.05). The reduction was less and nonsignificant in Sp and Liv groups (31.5 mL versus 22.2 mL, 36.4 mL versus 16.7 mL, respectively). Residual urine remained unchanged among nontreated patients. CONCLUSION: Our findings show a better acupuncture treatment effect on Kidney yang/qi xu than on other TCM syndromes found in women with recurrent cystitis. This has practical implications, and highlights the need for considering different TCM diagnostic categories in acupuncture research  
  Address Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Section for General Practice, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. terje.alraek@isf.uib.no  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Cystitis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score 68  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 21  
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Author Alraek, T.; Soedal, L. I.; Fagerheim, S. U.; Digranes, A.; Baerheim, A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture treatment in the prevention of uncomplicated recurrent lower urinary tract infections in adult women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication American journal of public health Abbreviated Journal Am J Public Health  
  Volume 92 Issue 10 Pages 1609-1611  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Tract Infection; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 26 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 98  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Tract Infection
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score 67  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number Serial 22  
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