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Author Cameron, I. D.; Wang, E.; Sindhusake, D. url  openurl
  Title A randomized trial comparing acupuncture and simulated acupuncture for subacute and chronic whiplash Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 36 Issue 26 Pages E1659-65  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Wounds and Injuries; Whiplash Injuries; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Sham Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial with 3 and 6 months follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with simulated acupuncture in patients with subacute and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Acupuncture is widely used for the treatment of neck and other musculoskeletal pain, and there is some evidence supporting its effectiveness for short-term pain relief. The effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of whiplash-associated disorders is not clear. METHODS: A total of 124 patients between 18 and 65 years with chronic (85%) or subacute whiplash-associated disorders (Grade I or II) were randomly allocated to real or simulated electroacupuncture treatment for 12 sessions during a 6-week period. Both treatments involved skin penetration with acupuncture needles and were provided by a single university-trained acupuncturist in a University Clinic in Sydney, Australia. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity (10-cm visual analog scale), disability (Neck Disability Index), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). Secondary outcomes were patient-specific activity scales, and the McGill Pain Rating Index. RESULTS: Mean initial pain intensity for all participants was 5.6 cm. Participants receiving the real electroacupuncture treatment had significantly greater reduction in pain intensity at 3 and 6 months, 0.9 cm (P = 0.05) and 1.3 cm (P = 0.007), respectively, in comparison to the sham electro-acupuncture group. After adjustment for baseline status, there was no significant reduction in disability, or improvement in health-related quality of life. There was an improvement in the activity scales of a similar size to the reduction in pain, but no difference in the McGill Index. CONCLUSION: Real electroacupuncture was associated with a significant reduction in pain intensity over at least 6 months. This reduction was probably not clinically significant. There was no improvement in disability or quality of life.  
  Address Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ian.cameron@sydney.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 124  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Whiplash Injuries
  Disease Category (down) Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 105  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moon, T. W.; Posadzki, P.; Choi, T. Y.; Park, T. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, M. S.; Ernst, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Treating Whiplash Associated Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomised Clinical Trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 870271-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Wounds and Injuries; Whiplash Injuries; Acupuncture  
  Abstract The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of whiplash associated disorder (WAD). Twenty databases were searched from their inceptions to Oct. 2013. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture (AT), electroacupuncture (EA), or dry needling (DN) for the treatment of WAD were considered eligible. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool. Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Most of the included RCTs have serious methodological flaws. Four of the RCTs showed effectiveness of AT, AT in addition to usual care (UC), AT in addition to herbal medicine (HM) or EA was more effective than relaxation, sham EA, sham EA in addition to HM or UC for conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and alleviating pain. In one RCT, DN in addition to physiotherapy (PT) had no effect compared to sham-DN in addition to PT for the reduction of pain. None of the RCTs showed that AT/EA/DN was more effective than various types of control groups in reducing disability/function. One RCT did not report between-group comparisons of any outcome measures. The evidence for the effectiveness of AT/EA/DN for the treatment of WAD is limited. Therefore, more research in this area is warranted.  
  Address Medical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Whiplash Injuries
  Disease Category (down) Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 888  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shin, B. C.; Lee, M. S.; Kong, J. C.; Jang, I.; Park, J. J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for spinal cord injury survivors in Chinese literature: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 5-6 Pages 316-327  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Wounds and Injuries; Spinal Cord Injuries; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE(S): To systematically review Chinese literature on the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). DATA SOURCES: The Chinese electronic databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched from their inceptions to May 2008. STUDY SELECTION: Trials reporting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where patients with SCI (with or without operation) were treated with acupuncture including electroacupuncture. DATA EXTRACTION: Methodological quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. Discrepancies were resolved through discussions and arbitration by two co-authors. RESULTS: The searches identified 236 potentially relevant studies, of which 7 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Five studies assessed functional recovery, and two bladder dysfunction. All the studies reported favourable effects of acupuncture on functional recovery or urinary function; however methodological quality of studies is poor in general. Meanwhile, pooled analysis of two trials assessing bladder dysfunction showed positive effectiveness compared with conventional treatment (n = 128, RR 1.51 [1.21, 1.90], P = 0.0004, heterogeneity Tau(2) < 0.01, Chi(2) = 0.01, P = 0.94, I(2) = 0%). CONCLUSION(S): Based on 7 RCTs done in China, the effectiveness of acupuncture for functional recovery and bladder dysfunction in SCI is suggestive. With the methodological quality of the included studies on functional recovery and the small number of studies on bladder dysfunction taken into consideration, further rigorous studies prove needed.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Spinal Cord Injuries
  Disease Category (down) Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1048  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wong, A. M.; Leong, C. P.; Su, T. Y.; Yu, S. W.; Tsai, W. C.; Chen, C. P. url  openurl
  Title Clinical trial of acupuncture for patients with spinal cord injuries Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 82 Issue 1 Pages 21-27  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Press Tacks; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Spinal Cord Injuries; Usual Care Control, Physical; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Nervous System Diseases; Wounds and Injuries; TENS  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE To examine whether electrical acupuncture therapy through adhesive surface electrodes and concomitant auricular acupuncture therapy could improve the neurologic or functional recovery in acute traumatic spinal cord injury patients.DESIGN A total of 100 acute traumatic spinal cord injury patients with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment grading of A and B were recruited into this study. They were randomly divided into the acupuncture and control groups. In the acupuncture group, electrical acupuncture therapy via the adhesive surface electrodes were applied to the bilateral Hou Hsi (SI3) and Shen Mo (B62) acupoints. In auricular acupuncture, four acupoints related to the spinal cord were selected for stimulation at the antihelix, helix, and lower portion of the ear-back areas. Acupuncture therapy was initiated early in the emergency room setting or soon after spinal surgical intervention. Rehabilitation therapy was also provided to the patients during acupuncture therapy. In the control group, only rehabilitation therapy was provided to the patients. Neurologic and functional scores were assessed during the time of admission, hospital discharge, and 1-yr postinjury follow-up.RESULTS There were significant improvements in neurologic (sensory and motor), functional, and FIM trade mark scores in the acupuncture group compared with the initial admission period when assessed during the time of hospital discharge and the 1-yr postinjury follow-up. A greater percentage of patients in the acupuncture group recovered to a higher ASIA impairment grading.CONCLUSION The use of concomitant auricular and electrical acupuncture therapies, when implemented early in acute spinal cord injury, can contribute to significant neurologic and functional recoveries  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Spinal Cord Injuries
  Disease Category (down) Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1316  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abraham, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupressure and acupuncture in preventing and managing postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Perioperative Practice Abbreviated Journal J Perioper Pract  
  Volume 18 Issue 12 Pages 543-551  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Emesis; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Systematic Review; Vomiting; AcuTrials  
  Abstract This literature review sets out to investigate the effectiveness of acupressure and acupuncture in preventing and managing postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in adult patients. PONV is problematic, affecting patient satisfaction, delayed discharge and even patient re-admission. Current treatment of PONV constitutes a variety of drug therapies, which are only partially effective. With the integration of complementary and alternative medicines in healthcare, this review examined 10 research studies investigating the use of acupressure and acupuncture in treating PONV. Three studies found acupressure to be effective in preventing PONV. However, population samples were small and the research designs had numerous anomalies. Overall the article suggests that acupuncture and acupressure are ineffective in preventing and managing PONV in adult patients. Further investigation of the effectiveness of acupressure and acupuncture, combined with current drug therapies, using well designed and adequately powered studies is needed. Published studies predominantly examined the use of P6 as the pressure point. Further studies should examine other 'acupoint' sites, to ascertain whether these are effective dependent upon the operative site  
  Address Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Coventry University, Coventry,  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Post Operative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Al-Sadi, M.; Newman, B.; Julious, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Anesthesia Abbreviated Journal Anesthesia  
  Volume 52 Issue Pages 658-661  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 81  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 10  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alizadeh, R.; Esmaeili, S.; Shoar, S.; Bagheri-Hariri, S.; Shoar, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting: efficacy of two acupuncture points versus a single one Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 71-75  
  Keywords RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Anesthesiology  
  Abstract Despite recent advances in anesthesiology and postoperative care, postoperative nausea and vomiting are common complaints. Although acupuncture techniques have received attention in anesthesiology, the ideal technique and selection of the most appropriate acupuncture points are still under debate. This study compared the efficacy of two simultaneous acupuncture points with that of a single point in the prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting following general anesthesia through a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 227 surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received acupuncture by stimulation only on the PC6 point (single group), and the second group underwent concomitant stimulation of the PC6 and the L14 acupuncture points (combined group) during surgery under general anesthesia. The prevalences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Of 115 patients in the combined group, 80 (69.6%) complained about nausea and vomiting compared with 96 (85.7%) in the single group, a significantly lower proportion (p<0.05). Our findings favor a combination of PC6 and LI4 stimulation for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 227  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 15  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andrzejowski, J.; Woodward, D. openurl 
  Title Semi Permanent Acupuncture Needles in the Prevention of Post-Operative Nausea and Vomiting Type of Study RCT
  Year 1996 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages -  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Press Tacks; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 32  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arnberger, M.; Stadelmann, K.; Alischer, P.; Ponert, R.; Melber, A.; Greif, R. openurl 
  Title Monitoring of neuromuscular blockade at the P6 acupuncture point reduces the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Anesthesiology Abbreviated Journal Anesthesiology  
  Volume 107 Issue 6 Pages 903-908  
  Keywords Anesthesia; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; Vomiting; Women's Health; AcuTrials; TENS; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Sham Acupoint Control; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Electrical stimulation of the P6 acupuncture point reduces the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Neuromuscular blockade during general anesthesia can be monitored with electrical peripheral nerve stimulation at the wrist. The authors tested the effect of neuromuscular monitoring over the P6 acupuncture point on the reduction of PONV. METHODS: In this prospective, double-blinded, randomized control trial, the authors investigated, with institutional review board approval and informed consent, 220 women undergoing elective laparoscopic surgery anesthetized with fentanyl, sevoflurane, and rocuronium. During anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade was monitored by a conventional nerve stimulator at a frequency of 1 Hz over the ulnar nerve (n = 110, control group) or over the median nerve (n = 110, P6 group) stimulating at the P6 acupuncture point at the same time. The authors evaluated the incidence of nausea and vomiting during the first 24 h. RESULTS: No differences in demographic and morphometric data were found between both groups. The 24-h incidence of PONV was 45% in the P6 acupuncture group versus 61% in the control group (P = 0.022). Nausea decreased from 56% in the control group to 40% in the P6 group (P = 0.022), but emesis decreased only from 28% to 23% (P = 0.439). Nausea decreased substantially during the first 6 h of the observation period (P = 0.009). Fewer subjects in the acupuncture group required ondansetron as rescue therapy (27% vs. 39%; P = 0.086). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative P6 acupuncture point stimulation with a conventional nerve stimulator during surgery significantly reduced the incidence of PONV over 24 h. The efficacy of P6 stimulation is similar to that of commonly used antiemetic drugs in the prevention of PONV  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, Switzerland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 220  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 35  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Beith, J.; Oh, B.; Chatfield, M.; Davis, E.; Venkateswaran, R openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Nausea, Vomiting, and Myelosuppression in Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Medical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct  
  Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 241-248  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Chemotherapy Side Effects; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control; Cancer  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been demonstrated as an effective way to control nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy but has not been tested in conjunction with optimal use of antiemetic medication.

Objective: The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for women with breast cancer, who were receiving chemotherapy.

Design: The study was a randomized controlled pilot trial.

Setting: This trial was conducted at a medical oncology clinic at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Patients: Thirty-two women with breast cancer were recruited from a medical oncology clinic between March 2008 and July 2009.

Intervention: The intervention tested was true EA versus sham EA.

Main Outcome Measures: The study tested the effect of EA on women with breast cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, with respect to nausea, vomiting, and blood cell counts.

Results: All but 2 participants completed EA treatment; these two dropouts were 1 from the true EA group and 1 from the sham EA group. No adverse effects of EA were reported. There was no significant difference in nausea and vomiting between the groups. However, there were significant differences in adjusted white blood-cell and neutrophil counts at week 6 in the true EA group, compared to the sham EA group.

Conclusions: The findings of this trial suggest that EA during chemotherapy is a promising option for controlling side-effects of chemotherapy. An adequately powered, randomized, controlled trial to confirm the effect of EA is, therefore, warranted.
 
  Address Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Room 158, Transient Building (F12), Fisher Road, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 32  
  Time in Treatment 9 Weeks Condition Nausea
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 65  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheong, K. B.; Zhang, J. P.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Z. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture in prevention and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting – a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 12 Pages 1-17  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; PONV; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture therapy for preventive and treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting(PONV), a condition which commonly present after anaesthesia and surgery is a subject of growing interest. OBJECTIVE: This paper included a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effect of different type of acupuncture and acupoint selection in PONV prevention and treatment. METHODS: Randomised controlled trials(RCTs) comparing acupuncture with non-acupuncture treatment were identified from databases PubMed, Cochrane, EBSCO, Ovid, CNKI and Wanfangdata. Meta-analysis on eligible studies was performed using fixed-effects model with RevMan 5.2. Results were expressed as RR for dichotomous data, with 95%CI. RESULTS: Thirty RCTs, 1276 patients (intervention) and 1258 patients (control) were identified. Meta-analysis showed that PC6 acupuncture significantly reduced the number of cases of early vomiting (postoperative 0-6h) (RR=0.36, 95%CI 0.19,0.71; P=0.003) and nausea (postoperative 0-24h) (RR=0.25, 95%CI 0.10,0.61; P=0.002), but not early nausea (postoperative 0-6h) (RR=0.64, 95%CI 0.34,1.19; P=0.150) and vomiting (postoperative 0-24h) (RR=0.82, 95%CI 0.48,1.38; P=0.450). PC6 acupressure significantly reduced the number of cases of nausea (RR=0.71, 95%CI 0.57,0.87; P=0.001) and vomiting (RR=0.62, 95%CI 0.49,0.80; P=0.000) at postoperative 0-24h. PC6 electro-acupoint stimulation significantly reduced the number of cases of nausea (RR=0.49, 95%CI 0.38,0.63; P<0.000) and vomiting (RR=0.50, 95%CI 0.36,0.70; P<0.000) at postoperative 0-24h. Stimulation of PC6 with other acupoint(s) significantly reduced the number of cases of nausea and vomiting (RR=0.29, 95%CI 0.17,0.49; P<0.000) at postoperative 0-24h. Stimulation of other acupoint(s)(non PC6) also significantly reduced the number of cases of nausea and vomiting (RR=0.63, 95%CI 0.49,0.81; P=0.000) at postoperative 0-24h. However, the quality of study was generally low in studies of PC6 combined with other acupoint(s) and other acupoint(s). Details of blinding were not reported in most reports. CONCLUSIONS: Besides PC6, PC6 combined with other acupoint(s) and other alternative acupoint(s) might be beneficial in prevention and treatment of PONV, the evidence justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 157  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dundee, J. W.; Chestnutt, W. N.; Ghaly, R. G.; Lynas, A. G. url  openurl
  Title Traditional Chinese acupuncture: a potentially useful antiemetic? Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Britsh medical journal Abbreviated Journal Br Med J (Clin Res Ed)  
  Volume 293 Issue 6547 Pages 583-584  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Nausea; Sham Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract Two consecutive studies were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as an antiemetic used in addition to premedication with opioids in patients undergoing minor gynaecological operations. In the first study 25 of the 50 patients underwent acupuncture immediately after premedication with 100 mg meptazinol, the rest receiving the drug alone, and in the second 75 patients were allocated randomly to one of three groups: a group receiving 10 mg nalbuphine and acupuncture, a group receiving premedication and dummy acupuncture, and a group receiving premedication alone. Manual needling for five minutes at the P6 acupuncture point (Neiguan) resulted in a significant reduction in perioperative nausea and vomiting in the 50 patients who underwent acupuncture compared with the 75 patients who received no acupuncture. These findings cannot be explained, but it is recommended that the use of acupuncture as an antiemetic should be explored further  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 125  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 270  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dundee, J. W.; Ghaly, G. url  openurl
  Title Local anesthesia blocks the antiemetic action of P6 acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1991 Publication Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics Abbreviated Journal Clin Pharmacol Ther  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 78-80  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Analgesia; Adverse Effects; Anesthesia; Emesis; Postoperative Complications; RCT; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; AcuTrials  
  Abstract The incidence of postoperative illness was monitored for 6 hours in 74 women premedicated with nalbuphine, 10 mg, and undergoing short gynecologic operations of similar duration under methohexitalnitrous oxide-oxygen anesthesia. Each patient received P6 acupuncture for 5 minutes at the time of administration of premedication. In random order the site of the acupuncture had been previously infiltrated with normal saline solution in half of the patients and 1% lidocaine in the remaining patients. Postoperative emetic sequelae occurred significantly more often in those who received lidocaine compared with the group that received saline solution. This demonstrates the ability of a local anesthetic administered at the point of stimulation to block the antiemetic action of P6 acupuncture in a manner similar to that shown by others for analgesia  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 271  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dundee, J. W.; Ghaly, G.; Fitzpatrick, K. T. openurl 
  Title Randomised comparison of the antiemetic effects of metoclopramide and electro-acupuncture in cancer chemotherapy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1988 Publication Abbreviated Journal Proc BPS  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 678-678  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cancer; Chemotherapy; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 272  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Enblom, A.; Johnsson, A.; Hammar, M.; Onelov, E.; Steineck, G.; Borjeson, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture in radiotherapy-induced nausea--a randomized controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO Abbreviated Journal Ann Oncol  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Emesis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is not known if verum (real) acupuncture is effective for nausea and vomiting (emesis) during radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomly treated 215 blinded cancer patients with verum: penetrating 'deqi' creating acupuncture (n = 109) or non-penetrating sham needles (n = 106) two to three times per week. The patients documented emesis daily during the radiotherapy period. Primary end point was the number of patients with at least one episode of nausea. RESULTS: In the verum and the sham acupuncture group, 70% and 62% experienced nausea at least once during the radiotherapy period (relative risk 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) for a mean number of 10.1 and 8.7 days. Twenty five percent and 28% vomited, and 42% and 37% used antiemetic drugs at least once, respectively. Ninety-five percent in the verum acupuncture group and 96% in the sham acupuncture group believed that the treatment had been effective against nausea. In both groups, 67% experienced positive effects on relaxation, mood, sleep or pain reduction and 89% wished to receive the treatment again. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture creating deqi is not more effective than sham in radiotherapy-induced nausea, but in this study, nearly all patients in both groups experienced that the treatment was effective for nausea.  
  Address Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 13  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 237  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Nausea
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 290  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Enblom, A.; Lekander, M.; Hammar, M.; Johnsson, A.; Onelov, E.; Ingvar, M.; Steineck, G.; Borjeson, S. url  openurl
  Title Getting the grip on nonspecific treatment effects: emesis in patients randomized to acupuncture or sham compared to patients receiving standard care Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Neoplasms; Cancer; Emesis; Nausea; Vomiting  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is not known whether or not delivering acupuncture triggers mechanisms cited as placebo and if acupuncture or sham reduces radiotherapy-induced emesis more than standard care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cancer patients receiving radiotherapy over abdominal/pelvic regions were randomized to verum (penetrating) acupuncture (n = 109; 99 provided data) in the alleged antiemetic acupuncture point PC6 or sham acupuncture (n = 106; 101 provided data) performed with a telescopic non-penetrating needle at a sham point 2-3 times/week during the whole radiotherapy period. The acupuncture cohort was compared to a reference cohort receiving standard care (n = 62; 62 provided data). The occurrence of emesis in each group was compared after a mean dose of 27 Gray. Nausea and vomiting were experienced during the preceding week by 37 and 8% in the verum acupuncture group, 38 and 7% in the sham acupuncture group and 63 and 15% in the standard care group, respectively. The lower occurrence of nausea in the acupuncture cohort (verum and sham) compared to patients receiving standard care (37% versus 63%, relative risk (RR) 0.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.5-0.8) was also true after adjustment for potential confounding factors for nausea (RR 0.8, CI 0.6 to 0.9). Nausea intensity was lower in the acupuncture cohort (78% no nausea, 13% a little, 8% moderate, 1% much) compared to the standard care cohort (52% no nausea, 32% a little, 15% moderate, 2% much) (p = 0.002). The acupuncture cohort expected antiemetic effects from their treatment (95%). Patients who expected nausea had increased risk for nausea compared to patients who expected low risk for nausea (RR 1.6; Cl 1.2-2.4). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Patients treated with verum or sham acupuncture experienced less nausea and vomiting compared to patients receiving standard care, possibly through a general care effect or due to the high level of patient expectancy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00621660.  
  Address Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 277  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 291  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ghaly, R. G.; Fitzpatrick, K. T.; Dundee, J. W. url  openurl
  Title Antiemetic studies with traditional Chinese acupuncture. A comparison of manual needling with electrical stimulation and commonly used antiemetics Type of Study RCT
  Year 1987 Publication Anaesthesia Abbreviated Journal Anaesthesia  
  Volume 42 Issue 10 Pages 1108-1110  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract The application of low frequency (10 Hz) electrical current for 5 minutes to an acupuncture needle placed at the P6 (Neiguan) point is as effective as manual needling in the reduction of emetic sequelae in women premedicated with nalbuphine 10 mg for a minor gynaecological operation carried out under a standard anaesthetic. Both were slightly, but not significantly, better than the antiemetic properties of cyclizine 50 mg  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 38  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 376  
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Author Gottschling, S.; Reindl, T. K.; Meyer, S.; Berrang, J.; Henze, G.; Graeber, S.; Ong, M. F.; Graf, N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture to Alleviate Chemotherapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Oncology – A Randomized Multicenter Crossover Pilot Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Klinische Pädiatrie Abbreviated Journal Klin Padiatr  
  Volume 220 Issue 6 Pages 365-370  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cancer; Chemotherapy; Cross-Over Design; Emesis; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; Neoplasms; Pediatrics; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We investigated whether acupuncture as a supportive antiemetic approach reduces the need for antiemetic rescue medication during highly emetogenic chemotherapy in pediatric oncology. We report on a multicenter crossover study at 5 tertiary hospitals in Germany. PROCEDURE: Twenty-three children (13.6 y,+/- 2.9) receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy for treatment of solid malignant tumors were included. Patients were randomly allocated to receive acupuncture treatment during either the second or third identical chemotherapy course together with standard antiemetic medication. The main outcome measure was the amount of additional antiemetic medication during chemotherapy. Secondary outcome measure was the number of episodes of vomiting per course. RESULTS: Fourty-six chemotherapy courses with or without acupuncture were compared. The need for rescue antiemetic medication was significantly lower in acupuncture courses compared to control courses (p=0.001) Episodes of vomiting per course were also significantly lower in courses with acupuncture (p=0.01). Except for pain from needling (4/23) no side effects occurred. Patients acceptance of acupuncture was high. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture as applied here seems to be effective in preventing nausea and vomiting in pediatric cancer patients  
  Address 1Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 23  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 389  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Helmreich, R. J.; Shiao, S. Y.; Dune, L. S. url  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of Acustimulation Effects on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Women Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Explore (NY)  
  Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 412-421  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Meta-Analysis; Nausea; Systematic Review; Morning Sickness; AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea and Vomiting; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to examine the effects of acustimulation (AS) on the prevention of nausea and vomiting in pregnant women (NVP). METHODS: Meta-analysis of effects of acustimulations (ie, acupressure, acupuncture, and electrical stimulation [ETS]) on NVP was conducted. Fourteen trials, eight random controlled trials (RCTs), with one RCT having two treatment modalities with four groups, and six crossover controlled trials (N = 1655) published over the last 16 years were evaluated for quality according to the Quality of Reports of Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (QUORUM) guidelines. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from the data provided by the investigators of the original trials. RESULTS: Before the treatment, 100% of the women (13 trials, n = 1615 women) were nauseated, but and 96.6% (1599/1655) reported vomiting. After the treatment, compared with the controls, AS (all modalities combined) reduced the proportion of nausea (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.35-0.62, P < .0001) and vomiting (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.51-0.68, P < .0001). Acupressure methods applied by finger pressure or wristband reduced NVP. The ETS method was also effective in reducing NVP. However, the acupuncture method did not show effects on reducing NVP. There was a placebo effect when compared with controls in reducing nausea (three trials, RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.39-1.02, P = .0479) and vomiting (five trials, RR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.50-0.91, P = .0084). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrates that acupressure and ETS had greater impact than the acupuncture methods in the treatment of NVP. However, the number of acupuncture trials was limited for pregnant women, perhaps because it is impossible to self-administer the acupuncture and thus inconvenient for women experiencing NVP as chronic symptoms  
  Address School of Nursing, Houston Baptist University, Houston, TX  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Morning Sickness
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 450  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ho, R. T.; Jawan, B.; Fung, S. T.; Cheung, H. K.; Lee, J. H. url  openurl
  Title Electro-acupuncture and postoperative emesis Type of Study RCT
  Year 1990 Publication Anaesthesia Abbreviated Journal Anaesthesia  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 327-329  
  Keywords Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; TENS; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Laparoscopy; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Vomiting; Women's Health; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  
  Abstract One hundred unpremedicated female patients of ASA grade 1 or 2 who underwent laparoscopy as outpatients were allocated randomly to one of four groups. All patients received general anaesthesia with fentanyl, thiopentone, halothane, nitrous oxide and oxygen; suxamethonium was given to facilitate tracheal intubation. In the recovery room, group 1 (control) received no treatment; group 2 received electro-acupuncture at the P6 point (Neiguan) on the right side for 15 minutes, group 3 received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation at the P6 point on the right side for 15 minutes and group 4 received prochlorperazine 5 mg intravenously. Any act of vomiting, including dry retching, during the first 3 postoperative hours was regarded as postoperative emesis. The incidence of postoperative emesis was 11/25 (44%) in group 1, 3/25 (12%, p less than 0.05) in group 2, 9/25 (36%) in group 3, and 3/25 (12%, p less than 0.05) in group 4. Our results suggest that electro-acupuncture is as effective as prochlorperazine, and may be better than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, in reducing postoperative emesis  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category (down) Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 457  
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