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Author Zheng-tao Lv; Wen Song; Jing Wu; Jun Yang; Tao Wang; Cai-hua Wu; Fang Gao; Xiao-cui Yuan; Ji-hong Liu; Man Li url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Enuresis, Nocturnal -- Drug Therapy; Cochrane Library; Embase; PubMed; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Chi Square Test; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Human; Child, Preschool; Child; Adolescence; Young Adult; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A metaanalysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824615. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This work was supported by Grants from the National NaturalScience Foundation of China (no. 81473768; no. 81101927)and Grants from Wuhan Science and Technology Bureau no.2013060602010280.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824615 Serial 2330  
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Author López-Garrido, B.; García-Gonzalo, J.; Patrón-Rodriguez, C.; Marlasca-Gutiérrez, M.J.; Gil-Pita, R.; Toro-Flores, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of Acupuncture on the Third Stage of Labor: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 199-205  
  Keywords Labor Stage, Third; Acupuncture -- Utilization -- In Pregnancy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Pregnancy; Spain; Single-Blind Studies; Placenta; Time Factors; Confidence Intervals; T-Tests; Adult; Female; Descriptive Statistics; Body Mass Index; Patient Attitudes -- Evaluation  
  Abstract Introduction A prolonged third stage of labor is considered to be a risk factor for postpartum hemorrhage. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of acupuncture to reduce the length of the third stage of labor. Methods Seventy-six puerperal women who had a normal spontaneous birth at the Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Spain, were included in a single-blind randomized trial and evaluated by a third party. Women were randomly assigned to receive true acupuncture or placebo acupuncture (also known as sham acupuncture). In the first group, a sterilized steel needle was inserted at the Ren Mai 6 point, which is located on the anterior midline between the umbilicus and the upper part of the pubic symphysis. In the second group, the insertion site was located at the same horizontal level as the Ren Mai 6 point but shifted slightly to the left of the anterior midline. The management of the third stage of labor was the same in both groups. Results Statistically significant differences were found, with an average time to placental expulsion of 15.2 minutes in the placebo group and 5.2 minutes in the acupuncture group. No major complications occurred in either group. Discussion These results confirm that acupuncture at the Ren Mai 6 point can decrease the time to placental expulsion. This treatment represents a simple, safe, and inexpensive way of decreasing the duration of the third stage of labor.  
  Address  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103777071. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150319. Revision Date: 20160229. Publication Type: Journal Article; clinical trial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: White Adrian, Langweiler Mark, Meinen Michael. Third stage of labour. (ACUPUNCTURE MED) Jun2015; 33 (3): 242-243. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Obstetric Care; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909407. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103777071 Serial 2333  
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Author de Mello Pereira, R.D.; da Silva, W.W.O.; Ramos, J.C.; Titonelli Alvim, N.A.; Pereira, C.D.; Rocha, T.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Integrative And Complementary Health Practices: An Integrative Review About Non Pharmacological Measures For Oncologic Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Nursing UFPE / Revista de Enfermagem UFPE Abbreviated Journal Rev Enfermagem Ufpe  
  Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 710-717  
  Keywords Cancer Pain -- Therapy; Alternative Therapies -- Utilization; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Oncologic Nursing; Systematic Review; Human; Medicine, Herbal; Acupuncture; Meditation; Manual Therapy; Yoga; Databases, Health; Descriptive Statistics; Content Analysis; Thematic Analysis; Cancer Patients; Holistic Nursing  
  Abstract  
  Address Public Health Technologist, National Women's, Child and Adolescent Health Institute IFF/FIOCRUZ, School of Nursing Anna Nery/EEAN/UFRJ. Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil  
  Publisher Revista de Enfermagem UFPE
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103755102. Language: Portuguese. Entry Date: 20150218. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Mexico & Central/South America; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 101484186. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103755102 Serial 2334  
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Author Langevin, H.M.; Schnyer, R.; MacPherson, H.; Davis, R.; Harris, R.E.; Napadow, V.; Wayne, P.M.; Milley, R.J.; Lao, L.; Stener-Victorin, E.; Kong, J.-T.; Hammerschlag, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 113-128  
  Keywords Research, Alternative Therapies; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture; Research Methodology; Study Design; Alternative Therapies; Acupuncture -- Methods; Time Factors; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Treatment Outcomes; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human; Medline; PubMed; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Systematic Review -- Evaluation; Meta Analysis -- Evaluation; Decision Making, Clinical  
  Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford Medical School, Palo Alto, CA.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103772045. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150312. Revision Date: 20160229. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103772045 Serial 2335  
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Author Chun-I Fan; Hsiu-Lin Huang; Yan-Ru Chen; Lee-Shia Hu; Shu-Ho Tasi; Shih-Hsin Hung url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Efficacy of Using an Auricular Acupressure Program to Improve Sleep Disturbance in Cancer Patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Nursing & Healthcare Research Abbreviated Journal J Nurs Healthc Res  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 3-12  
  Keywords Acupressure; Ear; Cancer Patients; Sleep Disorders -- Therapy; Magnetics; Acupuncture Points; Human; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Scales; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract Background: Previous studies have shown auricular acupressure as effective in improving the sleep disturbance of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, patients with end-stage renal disease, and nurses working three shifts. Sleep disturbance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer patients. However, related studies addressing cancer patients are scarce. Purpose: This research explores the efficacy of auricular acupressure on cancer patients with sleep disturbance. Methods: A prospective, randomized-controlled trial was used and 89 cancer patients with untreated sleep disturbance were recruited. The experimental group (n = 33) received pasted auricular magnetic beads and acupressure on the Shenmen, Xin, Shen, and Pizhixia points. The control group (n = 56) received general nursing directions about insomnia only. All participants were assessed using the Chinese Athens Insomnia Scale (CAIS-8) prior to the intervention as well as on the 14th and 28th days after the intervention. The intervention effects were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: The results showed that sleep disturbance improved more significantly in the experimental group than in the control group on both the 14th and 28th days. The scores were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group in several aspects, including sleep induction, awakenings during the night, early morning awakenings, total sleep duration, sleepiness during the day, sleep quality, and total CAIS-8 scores (p < .05). Conclusions / Implications for Practice: Findings indicate that auricular acupressure is an effective non-invasive and alternative method for improving sleep disturbance in cancer patients. Furthermore, this intervention may help reduce insomnia-drug dependence and improve patient quality of life, making auricular acupressure worth promoting to community-dwelling cancer patients.  
  Address Nurse Supervisor, Department of Nursing, Taipei Veterans General Hospital  
  Publisher Taiwan Nurses Association
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103770272. Language: Chinese. Entry Date: 20150317. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Asia; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Instrumentation: Chinese Athens Insomnia Scale (CAIS¿8). Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103770272 Serial 2338  
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Author Xiao Cun Yang; Tao Yin; Qian Gao; Ling Jun Kong url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Immunomodulatory Effect of Acupoint Application for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Immune System; Asthma -- Therapy; Pediatric Care; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Asthma -- Immunology; Human; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; China; Child; Funding Source; Data Analysis Software  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the evidence on the immunomodulatory effect of acupoint application for childhood asthma. Methods. Five electronic databases through October 2014 were searched. The risk of bias in eligible studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of random-effects model were calculated. And heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I² index. Results. Six studies were included in our review. The aggregated results suggested that acupoint application showed the beneficial effect for childhood asthma in improving IgA (SMD, -0.83; 95% CI -1.14 to -0.52; P < 0.00001), IgE (SMD, -0.52; 95% CI -0.76 to -0.29; P < 0.001), IgG (SMD, -1.17; 95% CI -1.61 to -0.74; P < 0.0001), IL-4 (SMD, -0.57; 95% CI -0.91 to -0.23; P = 0.0009), and IFN-? (SMD, -0.38; 95% CI -0.71 to -0.04; P = 0.03) but not IgM (SMD, -0.40; 95% CI -0.98 to 0.18; P = 0.18). And the effective dose of acupoint application may be 2-6 hours/time and a total of 3 times within 4 weeks. Conclusions. This review showed the positive evidence that acupoint application had the favorable immunomodulatory effect for childhood asthma. However, more studies with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.  
  Address Department of Tuina, Second Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210017, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 108824942. Language: English. Entry Date: 20170222. Revision Date: 20170222. Publication Type: journal article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. Grant Information: This work is supported by the Young Teacher Training Program of Education Committee of Shanghai (ZZszy12050); the Young Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (81403496); the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81273869); the Key Discipline of Tuina of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of China.. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 108824942 Serial 2339  
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Author Llamas-Ramos, R.; Pecos-Martin, D.; Gallego-Izquierdo, T.; Llamas-Ramos, I.É.S.; Plaza-Manzano, G.; Ortega-Santiago, R.; Cleland, J.; FernÁNdez-De-Las-PeÑAs, C.É.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes Between Trigger Point Dry Needling and Trigger Point Manual Therapy for the Management of Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 44 Issue 11 Pages 852-861  
  Keywords Trigger Point -- Therapy; Needles -- Utilization; Manual Therapy; Pain Threshold; Functional Status; Range of Motion; Neck Pain -- Therapy; Human; Spain; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Chronic Pain -- Therapy; Adult; Male; Female; Pain Measurement; Scales; Questionnaires; Functional Assessment; Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Confidence Intervals; Summated Rating Scaling; Self Report; Interrater Reliability; Intrarater Reliability; Algometry; Biophysical Instruments; Power Analysis; Two-Tailed Test; Data Analysis Software; P-Value; Descriptive Statistics  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN; Randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) and TrP manual therapy (MT) on pain, function, pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain. BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that TrP DN could be effective in the treatment of neck pain. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of TrP DN and TrP MT in this population. METHODS: Ninety-four patients (mean ± SD age, 31 ± 3 years; 66% female) were randomized into a TrP DN group (n = 47) or a TrP MT group (n = 47). Neck pain intensity (11-point numeric pain rating scale), cervical range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the spinous process of C7 were measured at baseline, postintervention, and at follow-ups of 1 week and 2 weeks after treatment. The Spanish version of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire was used to measure disability/function at baseline and the 2-week follow-up. Mixed-model, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to determine if a time-by-group interaction existed on the effects of the treatment on each outcome variable, with time as the within-subject variable and group as the between-subject variable. RESULTS: The ANOVA revealed that participants who received TrP DN had outcomes similar to those who received TrP MT in terms of pain, function, and cervical range of motion. The 4-by-2 mixed-model ANOVA also revealed a significant time-by-group interaction (P<.001) for PPT: patients who received TrP DN experienced a greater increase in PPT (decreased pressure sensitivity) than those who received TrP MT at all follow-up periods (between-group differences: posttreatment, 59.0 kPa; 95% confidence interval [Cl]: 40.0, 69.2; 1- week follow-up, 69.2 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 79.1; 2- week follow-up, 78.9 kPa; 95% Cl: 49.5, 89.0). CONCLUSION: The results of this clinical trial suggest that 2 sessions of TrP DN and TrP MT resulted in similar outcomes in terms of pain, disability, and cervical range of motion. Those in the TrP DN group experienced greater improvements in PPT over the cervical spine. Future trials are needed to examine the effects of TrP DN and TrP MT over long-term follow-up periods,  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Franklin Pierce University, Concord, NH; Rehabilitation Services, Concord Hospital, Concord, NH; Manual Therapy Fellowship Program, Regis University, Denver, CO  
  Publisher American Physical Therapy Association, Orthopaedic Section
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107807283. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141120. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: Ware John W., Llamas-Ramos Rocio, Pecos-Martín Daniel, Gallego-Izquierdo Tomás, Llamas-Ramos Inés, Plaza-Manzano Gustavo, et al. MISREPORT OF TRIGGER POINT DIAGNOSIS RELIABILITY. (J ORTHOP SPORTS PHYS THER) Feb2015; 45 (2): 144-146. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management; Physical Therapy; Sports Medicine. Instrumentation: Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire [Spanish version]. NLM UID: 7908150. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107807283 Serial 2342  
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Author Ling, W.-man; Lui, L.Y.Y.; So, W.K.W.; Chan, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture and Acupressure on Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Oncology Nursing Forum Abbreviated Journal Oncol Nurs Forum  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 581-592  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Acupressure; Cancer Fatigue -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; Cancer Patients; Thematic Analysis; CINAHL Database; Medline; Resource Databases; Middle Age; Scales; Sample Size; Treatment Duration  
  Abstract Purpose/Objectives: To critically examine the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure in the management of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in adult patients with cancer.Data Sources: 18 databases were searched for randomized, controlled trials published in English and Chinese through April 2014.Data Synthesis: Given the heterogeneity of data, meta-analysis was not conducted. A six-step thematic analysis method was used to synthesize the results.Conclusions: Although results are inconclusive, acupuncture and acupressure tend to be effective in relieving CRF, with the former producing a greater improvement. Future research is recommended to contribute further evidence.Implications for Nursing: Nurses should know about the relative effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure in the management of CRF to educate and support their patients.  
  Address Nethersole School of Nursing, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China  
  Publisher Oncology Nursing Society
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103911422. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141030. Revision Date: 20151102. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Instrumentation: Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS); Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI); Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy¿Fatigue subscale (FACIT-F); Cancer- Related Fatigue Distress Scale (CRFDS); Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI); Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). NLM UID: 7809033. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103911422 Serial 2343  
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Author Calamita, S.A.P.; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D.A.; De Melo, N.C.; Dos Santos, D.M.; de Lassa, R.; de Mendonça, F.S.; Oliveira, C.S.; Amorim, C.F.; Gonzalez, T.O.; Fumagalli, M.A.; de Gomes, C.A.F.P.; Politti, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 100-100  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Nonspecific neck pain can cause considerable suffering, possible disability and reductions in quality of life and productivity. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain.Methods/design: A total of 12 patients with nonspecific neck pain and 12 healthy subjects will be enrolled in a randomized, single-blind crossover study. Each subject will receive two forms of treatment in random order: a single session of traditional acupuncture (acupoints: triple energizer 5, 'Wai-guan' and large intestine 11, 'Qu-chi') and sham acupuncture. To eliminate carry-over treatment effects, a one-week wash-out period will be respected between sessions. Surface electromyography will be used to determine motor control in the upper trapezius muscle before and after treatment. The outcome measures in the group with neck pain will be a numerical pain rating scale (range: 0 (no pain) to 10 (maximum pain)), documentation of the pain area on a body chart and cervical range of motion. Comparisons before and after acupuncture treatment will demonstrate whether acupoints affect the activity of the upper trapezius muscle, pain and cervical range of motion.Discussion: The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the immediate effect of acupuncture on pain, cervical range of motion and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with nonspecific neck pain. Data will be published after the study is completed. The study will support the practice of evidence-based physical therapy for individuals with nonspecific neck pain.Trial Registration: This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT0984021 ) on 7 November 2013 ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01984021 ).  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109721586. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109721586 Serial 2344  
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Author Cho, S.-Y.; Lee, D.-H.; Shin, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Koh, J.S.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Kim, H.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 68-68  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurological disease with a high mortality rate. Several serious complications frequently arise after successful surgery for this condition. Cerebral vasospasm, one such complication, occurs in 50 to 70% of SAH patients. These patients suffer neurological symptoms known as delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND); however, the effect of treatment of vasospasm is limited. The major pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm is the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) and activation of vasoconstrictors. Acupuncture is known to increase the production and activity of vascular endothelial cell-derived NO and improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. A preliminary retrospective case study to investigate the ability of acupuncture to prevent the occurrence of cerebral vasospasm has been conducted. However, no randomized, controlled clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm.Methods/design: This trial will be a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, patient-assessor-blinded clinical trial. A total of 80 patients with SAH will be randomized into two groups: a study group given acupuncture, electroacupuncture, and intradermal acupuncture, and a control group given mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and sham intradermal acupuncture. Intervention will start within 96 h after SAH, and a total of 12 sessions will be performed during a 2-week period. The primary outcome measure will be the occurrence of DIND, and the secondary outcomes will be vasospasm as measured by cerebral angiography, transcranial Doppler, clinical symptoms, vasospasm-related infarcts, NO and endothelin-1 plasma levels, mortality, and modified Rankin Scale scores.Discussion: This trial will examine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral vasospasm after SAH. The placebo effect will be excluded and the mechanism of action of the treatments will be evaluated through blood testing.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02275949 , Registration date: 26 October 2014.  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109724256. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109724256 Serial 2345  
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Author Su, T.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, W.; Chu, H.; Luo, Q.; Lu, J.; An, J.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The efficacy of electroacupuncture for the treatment of simple female stress urinary incontinence – comparison with pelvic floor muscle training: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trials Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 45-45  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Previous research has shown that electroacupuncture therapy has a potential therapeutic effect for simple female stress urinary incontinence. In this study, pelvic floor muscle training, the first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials and recommended by international clinical practice, is used as a control group to demonstrate whether electroacupuncture therapy is a better method for female stress urinary incontinence.Methods/design: A randomized controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of electroacupuncture for female stress urinary incontinence compared with pelvic floor muscle training. The safety of electroacupuncture and patient compliance will also be evaluated. Untoward reaction to the electroacupuncture, including a broken needle, fainting on acupuncture, or pain during acupuncture, will be recorded and the therapy will be stopped if an untoward reaction occurs. After we have received full ethical approval and patient consent, participants will be randomized to receive a series of 24 electroacupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training interventions. The frequency and amount of leakage will be measured as the primary outcome parameters. Secondary outcome parameters include the 1-hour pad test, the short-form of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire, patient subjective effectiveness evaluation, weekly usage of pad, and usage of specialty therapy for female stress urinary incontinence.Discussion: This trial will help to determine whether electroacupuncture is a more effective treatment than pelvic floor muscle training for patients with female stress urinary incontinence.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01940432 (12 September 2013).  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109724267. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20161223. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101263253. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109724267 Serial 2346  
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Author Liu, F.; Li, Z.-M.; Jiang, Y.-J.; Chen, L.-D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Use in the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment After Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 535-544  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cognition Disorders -- Therapy; Stroke -- Complications; Human; Alternative Therapies; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; China; Funding Source; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Cochrane Library; Neuropsychological Tests; Data Analysis Software; Odds Ratio; Linear Regression; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Male; Female; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Chi Square Test  
  Abstract Objective: This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on cognitive impairment (function) after a stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation were identified from databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Chinese Periodical Database, Wangfang Chinese Periodical Database, Chinese Bio-medicine Database, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases) and two relevant journals ( Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion and the Journal of Shanghai Acupuncture and Moxibustion). Meta-analyses were conducted for the eligible RCTs. Results: Twenty-one trials with a total of 1421 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled random-effects estimates of the change in the Mini-Mental State Examination were calculated for the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation. Following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of intervention with acupuncture, the merged mean difference was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-4.21; p<.00001) and 2.03 (95% CI, 0.26-3.80; p=0.02), respectively. For the comparison of 3-4 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the merged MD in Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination total scores was 5.63 (95% CI, 3.95-7.31; p<.00001). For the comparison of 8-12 weeks of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to medicine or rehabilitation groups, the P300 latency merged MD was ?12.80 (95% CI, ?21.08 to ?4.51; p<.00001), while the P300 amplitude merged MD was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p<.00001). Overall, the study quality was rated as moderate on the basis of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (part 2: 8.5). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture had positive effects on cognitive function after stroke and supports the need for additional research on the potential benefits of this therapeutic approach.  
  Address Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Accession Number: 103971838. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al); Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination. Grant Information: This study was supported by the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971838 Serial 2347  
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Author Jakes, D.; Kirk, R.; Muir, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Qualitative Systematic Review of Patients' Experiences of Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 663-671  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Patient Attitudes; Health Beliefs; Human; New Zealand; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Qualitative Studies -- Evaluation; Alternative Therapies; CINAHL Database; PubMed; Medline; Psycinfo; Quantitative Studies -- Evaluation; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Scales; Thematic Analysis; Decision Making, Patient; Treatment Outcomes; Descriptive Statistics; Validity; Patient Satisfaction; Educational Status; Diagnosis -- Methods; Health Care Delivery; Communication; Professional-Patient Relations; Sensation; Quality of Life  
  Abstract Objectives: To present the results of a systematic review of studies on acupuncture patients' health beliefs and treatment experiences. Search strategy: The search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and PsychINFO for qualitative and mixed-methods studies expressing the voice of acupuncture patients. Reference lists of relevant articles were also searched. The review was restricted to studies published in English. Data collection and analysis: Study selection, quality appraisal, and data extraction were performed sequentially. Quality was appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument, and the Dedoose mixed methods tool was used in data management and analysis. Results: Four overarching themes were identified: reasons for using acupuncture, treatment experiences, treatment outcomes, and therapeutic model. Conclusions: Patients' reasons for using acupuncture are diverse and include dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and attraction to holistic and empowering models of healthcare. Treatment is thought to relieve symptoms of the presenting concern and a range of other effects that improve well-being. This review highlights the need to improve understanding of patients' health-seeking behaviors and how individually meaningful treatment outcomes may be understood and assessed, particularly within complementary and alternative medicine.  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103889722. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889722 Serial 2348  
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Author Liu, C.-Z.; Xie, J.-P.; Wang, L.-P.; Liu, Y.-Q.; Song, J.-S.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Shi, G.-X.; Zhou, W.; Gao, S.-Z.; Li, S.-L.; Xing, J.-M.; Ma, L.-X.; Wang, Y.-X.; Zhu, J.; Liu, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Randomized Controlled Trial of Single Point Acupuncture in Primary Dysmenorrhea Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Pain Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 6 Pages 910-920  
  Keywords Dysmenorrhea -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Treatment Outcomes; Randomized Controlled Trials; Multicenter Studies; China; Academic Medical Centers; Adolescence; Adult; Descriptive Statistics; Visual Analog Scaling; Human; Female; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Repeated Measures; Post Hoc Analysis; Models, Statistical; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Data Analysis Software; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Dongzhimen Hospital affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine  
  Publisher Oxford University Press / USA
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  Notes Accession Number: 103966751. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140629. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Pain and Pain Management. Grant Information: The study was funded by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, reference number: 2012CB518506).. NLM UID: 100894201. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103966751 Serial 2349  
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Author Craig, L.T.B.; Rubin, L.E.H.; Peck, J.D.; Anderson, M.; Marshall, L.A.; Soules, M.R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture performed before and after embryo transfer: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Reproductive Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Reprod Med  
  Volume 59 Issue 5-6 Pages 313-320  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Adverse Effects; Embryo Transfer -- Methods; Adult; Female; Fertilization in Vitro; Human; Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy; Prospective Studies; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical pregnancy rates in women who underwent fresh embryo transfer (ET) with and without one acupuncture session before and after the transfer using a modified Paulus protocol. STUDY DESIGN: The prospective, physician-blinded study randomized 113 women to either no intervention (n = 56) or acupuncture performed off-site (n = 57). Secondary outcomes were positive pregnancy test and live birth rates. Intent-to-treat analysis and per protocol analysis were performed. RESULTS: No difference in age and in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) parameters were detected. Compared to the control group, the treatment group had a lower pregnancy rate (43.6% vs. 64.8%, p = 0.045). More women in the control group had live births than did those in the acupuncture group (56.0% vs. 36.0%, respectively, p = 0.033). Generalized mixed models revealed that patients who received acupuncture had lower odds of clinical pregnancy than those who did not undergo acupuncture treatment (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.19-0.93). CONCLUSION: Our study found that acupuncture performed off-site on the day of ET was detrimental to the success of the transfer. More research is needed with a greater number of subjects to elucidate the role of acupuncture before and after ET, ideal treatment frequency, and to further explore the role of individualized acupuncture treatment on IVF-ET pregnancy rates.  
  Address  
  Publisher Journal of Reproductive Medicine
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107857223. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140815. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Obstetric Care; Women's Health. NLM UID: 0173343. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107857223 Serial 2379  
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Author Ma, X.; Guo, Z.; Wang, S.; Zhang, W.; Guo, T.; Chen, J.; Sun, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, C.; Sun, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Eletroacupuncture (EA) Combined with Antidepressants on Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 5 Pages A8-A8  
  Keywords Depression -- Drug Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Paroxetine -- Administration and Dosage; Symptom Distress Scale; Psychological Tests; Repeated Measures; Quality of Life  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103939556. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140512. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Instrumentation: CES-D; Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) (McCorkle and Young); HAMD-17. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103939556 Serial 2380  
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Author Close, C.; Sinclair, M.; Liddle, S.D.; Madden, E.; McCullough, J.E.M.; Hughes, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review investigating the effectiveness of Complementary and Alternative Medicine ( CAM) for the management of low back and/or pelvic pain ( LBPP) in pregnancy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Advanced Nursing Abbreviated Journal J Adv Nurs  
  Volume 70 Issue 8 Pages 1702-1716  
  Keywords Alternative Therapies -- Utilization -- In Pregnancy; Low Back Pain -- Therapy -- In Pregnancy; Pelvic Pain -- Therapy -- In Pregnancy; Human; Systematic Review; Pregnancy; Female; Randomized Controlled Trials; Medline; PubMed; Embase; CINAHL Database; Acupuncture; Osteopathy; Chiropractic; Bias (Research); Treatment Outcomes; Funding Source  
  Abstract Aim To evaluate and summarize the current evidence on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for the management of low back pain and/or pelvic pain in pregnancy. Background International research demonstrates that 25-30% of women use complementary and alternative medicine to manage low back and pelvic pain in pregnancy without robust evidence demonstrating its effectiveness. Design A systematic review of randomized controlled trials to determine the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for low back and/or pelvic pain in pregnancy. Data sources Cochrane library (1898-2013), PubMed (1996-2013), MEDLINE (1946-2013), AMED (1985-2013), Embase (1974-2013), Cinahl (1937-2013), Index to Thesis (1716-2013) and Ethos (1914-2013). Review methods Selected studies were written in English, randomized controlled trials, a group 1 or 2 therapy and reported pain reduction as an outcome measure. Study quality was reviewed using Risk of Bias and evidence strength the Cochrane Grading of Recommendations and Development Evaluation Tool. Results Eight studies were selected for full review. Two acupuncture studies with low risk of bias showed both clinically important changes and statistically significant results. There was evidence of effectiveness for osteopathy and chiropractic. However, osteopathy and chiropractic studies scored high for risk of bias. Strength of the evidence across studies was very low. Conclusion There is limited evidence supporting the use of general CAM for managing pregnancy-related low back and/or pelvic pain. However , the restricted availability of high-quality studies, combined with the very low evidence strength, makes it impossible to make evidence-based recommendations for practice.  
  Address South Eastern Health & Social Care Trust Northern Ireland  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
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  Notes Accession Number: 103973918. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140721. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Europe; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Evidence-Based Practice; Obstetric Care. Grant Information: a PhD funded by the Department of Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland.. NLM UID: 7609811. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103973918 Serial 2351  
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Author Hunter, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupoint stimulation for fibromyalgia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists Abbreviated Journal J Acupuncture Assoc Charter Physiother  
  Volume 30 Issue Pages 110-111  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Fibromyalgia -- Rehabilitation; Human; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Notes Accession Number: 107836770. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141104. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Physical Therapy. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107836770 Serial 2352  
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Author Levett, K.M.; Smith, C.A.; Dahlen, H.G.; Bensoussan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth: a critical narrative review of current systematic review evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 523-540  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Analgesia; Labor Pain -- Therapy; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Embase; Female; Human; Medline; Pregnancy; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Reviews of maternity services highlight the need for a reduction of medical interventions for women with low risk pregnancies and births to prevent the potential cascade of interventions and their associated risks. Complementary medicines (CM) such as acupuncture and acupressure have claimed to be effective in reducing interventions in labour; however, systematic reviews of evidence to date are conflicting. AIMS: To examine current evidence from systematic reviews on the topic of acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth, and to evaluate the methodological and treatment frameworks applied to this evidence. METHODS: A search limited to systematic reviews of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane databases was performed in December 2013 using the keywords 'CAM', 'alternative medicine', 'complementary medicine', 'complementary therapies', 'traditional medicine', 'Chinese Medicine', 'Traditional Chinese Medicine', 'acupuncture', 'acupressure', cross-referenced with 'childbirth', 'birth', labo*r', and 'delivery'. The quality of the evidence is also evaluated in the context of study design. RESULTS: The RCTs included in these systematic reviews differed in terms of study designs, research questions, treatment protocols and outcome measures, and yielded some conflicting results. It may be inappropriate to include these together in a systematic review, or pooled analysis, of acupuncture for labour with an expectation of an overall conclusion for efficacy. Trials of acupuncture and acupressure in labour show promise, but further studies are required. CONCLUSION: The use of current systematic reviews of the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure for labour and birth may be misleading. Appropriate methods and outcome measures for investigation of acupuncture and acupressure treatment should more carefully reflect the research question being asked. The use of pragmatic trials designs with woman-centred outcomes may be appropriate for evaluating the effectiveness of these therapies.  
  Address National Institute for Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: A.Bensoussan@uws.edu.au.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
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  Notes Accession Number: 103834125. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103834125 Serial 2353  
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Author Baccetti, S.; Da Frè, M.; Becorpi, A.; Faedda, M.; Guerrera, A.; Monechi, M.V.; Munizzi, R.M.; Parazzini, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Hot Flushes in Menopause: A Randomized Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 550-557  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Hot Flashes -- Prevention and Control; Perimenopausal Symptoms -- Prevention and Control; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Italy; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Intervention Trials; Pretest-Posttest Design; Alternative Therapies; Women's Health; Female; Massage; Self Care; Diet Therapy; Combined Modality Therapy; Questionnaires; Statistical Significance; Sleep Disorders; Anger; Pain; Depression; Prospective Studies; Middle Age; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; T-Tests; Linear Regression; Paired T-Tests; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes and other menopause-related symptoms used in an integrated system, including such therapeutic techniques as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage. Design: Randomized trial. Setting: Outpatient center. Participants: One hundred women in spontaneous menopause with at least three episodes of hot flushes daily were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (50 per group): Women in group A were given diet, self-massage training, and treatment with acupuncture, and women in group B (the control group) were given the same diet and self-massage training, but treatment with acupuncture started 6 weeks after they were enrolled into the study. Intervention: Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 6 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures: Mean change in frequency and/or intensity in menopause-related symptoms were estimated by questionnaire after treatment at week 4. Results: Treatment with acupuncture significantly reduced the occurrence of hot flushes and sudden sweating ( p<.001). Other symptoms (sleep disorders, tightness in the chest, irritability, bone pain, feeling depressed) significantly improved. Conclusions: Acupuncture in an integrated system that includes therapeutic techniques such as diet therapy and Tuina self-massage can be used to treat hot flushes and selected symptoms in postmenopausal women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103971835. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140709. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Women's Health. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103971835 Serial 2354  
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