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Author Tianjun Wang; Lingling Wang; Wenjian Tao; Li Chen url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture combined with an antidepressant for patients with depression in hospital: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 308-312  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Combined Modality Therapy -- Evaluation; Depression -- Therapy; Treatment Outcomes; Hospitalization; Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors -- Therapeutic Use; Randomized Controlled Trials; Human; Middle Age; Adult; Data Analysis Software; Scales; Analysis of Variance; Aged; Confidence Intervals; Descriptive Statistics; Funding Source; Male; Female  
  Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for patients with depression in hospital using a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Methods 76 patients with depression were randomly divided into two groups (randomisation ratio 2:1 for treatment and control groups (CGs), respectively) and 71 patients completed the study. The 45 patients in the treatment group (TG) underwent acupuncture and received an SSRI and the 26 patients in the CG received an SSRI only. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) was used to quantitatively assess patients after 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks of treatment. Results The mean (SD) baseline total HDRS scores were 22.2 (0.60) and 22.1 (0.33) in the TG and CG, respectively. After the first week of treatment the HDRS score for the TG was reduced to 15.6 (0.81), significantly different from the score of 18.3 (0.55) for the CG, p<0.05. This significant difference was maintained to the end of the 6-week treatment period, when HDRS scores had fallen to 6.3 (0.49) and 8.2 (0.35) for the TG and CG, respectively. Conclusions Acupuncture combined with an SSRI showed a statistically significant benefit for patients with depression in hospital over the 6-week period compared with SSRIs alone. This reduction in symptoms started in the first week and continued throughout the 6 weeks of treatment.  
  Address Jiangsu Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Nanjing, China  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103988637. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140815. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Grant Information: Opening Projects from the Laboratory of Acupuncture-Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine (No JKA200505).. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103988637 Serial 2355  
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Author Park, S.-W.; Yi, S.-H.; Lee, J.A.; Hwang, P.W.; Yoo, H.C.; Kang, K.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages 672-682  
  Keywords Stroke -- Complications; Muscle Spasticity -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Human; South Korea; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; Funding Source; Alternative Therapies; Treatment Outcomes; Cochrane Library; PubMed; CINAHL Database; Embase; Descriptive Statistics; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Measurement Issues and Assessments; Scales; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; H-Reflex; Motor Neurons  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO host, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke.  
  Address Department of Motor & Cognitive Rehabilitation, Korea National Rehabilitation Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.; Kyungheesarang Oriental Medicine Clinic, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103889719. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140909. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Jadad Scale. Grant Information: This research was supported by a grant (08-B-02) from the Korea National Rehabilitation Center Research Institute.. NLM UID: 9508124. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103889719 Serial 2356  
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Author Schlaeger, J.; Nenngui, X.; Mejta, C.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Vulvodynia Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 59 Issue 5 Pages 551-551  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Utilization; Vulvar Diseases -- Therapy; Pain -- Therapy; Dyspareunia -- Therapy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Dyspareunia -- Epidemiology; Female; Pilot Studies; Treatment Outcomes -- Evaluation  
  Abstract Purpose A randomized controlled pilot study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an acupuncture protocol for the treatment of vulvodynia. Hypotheses 1) Acupuncture reduces vulvar pain and dyspareunia in women with vulvodynia. 2) Acupuncture increases sexual function in women with vulvodynia. Significance The incidence of vulvodynia in US women has been reported to be as high as 16%. Research suggests that there is no consistently effective standardized treatment for vulvodynia. Methods Thirty-six women with vulvodynia met inclusion criteria, and 36 women completed the study. The women were randomly assigned either to the acupuncture group or to the wait-list control group. The 18 participants assigned to the acupuncture group received acupuncture 2 times per week for 5 weeks for a total of 10 sessions. Results Vulvar pain and dyspareunia showed statistically significant reductions, and sexual function showed a statistically significant increase for women in the acupuncture group as compared to the wait-list control group. Acupuncture showed a trend for increased vaginal lubrication and reduced affective pain. Acupuncture did not increase sexual desire, sexual arousal, ability to orgasm, or sexual satisfaction in women with vulvodynia. Discussion This was the first randomized controlled pilot study to examine the use of acupuncture for the treatment of vulvodynia. The acupuncture protocol was feasible and in this small sample reduced vulvar pain and dyspareunia, and increased sexual function in women with vulvodynia. This study should be replicated in a larger double-blind randomized controlled trial, and if results indicate, this acupuncture treatment protocol should be considered a valid and important option in the treatment of this incapacitating pain syndrome.  
  Address Governors State University  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103903077. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141010. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; abstract; clinical trial; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Obstetric Care; Pain and Pain Management; Women's Health. NLM UID: 100909407. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103903077 Serial 2357  
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Author Kim TH; Lee MS; Kim KH; Kang JW; Choi TY; Ernst E url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for treating acute ankle sprains in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 6 Pages N.Pag-N.Pag  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Ankle Sprain -- Therapy; Athletic Injuries; Acupuncture -- Classification; Adult; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Confidence Intervals; Embase; Human; Medicine, Herbal; Medline; Meta Analysis; Relative Risk; Systematic Review  
  Abstract An acute ankle sprain is a sudden-onset injury of one or more of the ankle ligaments. It is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in the general population as well as in athletes. In some countries, such as China and Korea, acupuncture is frequently used in the treatment of ankle sprains, either as a single treatment or a secondary intervention accompanied by standard medical treatment. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of acupuncture for the treatment of ankle sprains in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (May 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1948 to May week 2 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May week 2 2013), China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases (1994 to August week 4 2013), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1937 to May 2013), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (1985 to May 2013), Science Links Japan (1996 to August week 4 2013), several Korean medical databases (August week 4 2013), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (August week 4 2013), the bibliographic references of included trials and conference proceedings. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials involving adults with acute ankle sprains. We included all types of acupuncture practices, such as needle acupuncture, electroacupuncture, laser acupuncture, pharmacoacupuncture, non-penetrating acupuncture point stimulation (e.g. acupressure and magnets) and moxibustion. Acupuncture could be compared with control (no treatment or placebo) or another standard non-surgical intervention. Two review authors independently screened the search results, assessed trial eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes. We conducted meta-analyses using the fixed-effect method or, where appropriate, the random-effects method, and used 95% confidence intervals (CI) throughout. We included a total of 20 heterogeneous studies (2012 participants with acute ankle sprains); three of which included more than one comparison. Seventeen trials were conducted in China. All of the studies had a high risk of bias due to lack of blinding. The results may also have been affected by selection bias, particularly as five studies were quasi-randomised controlled trials and 12 studies gave no information on their method of randomisation. Of our three prespecified primary outcomes, only cure rate was reported by the majority of studies. No study reported on patient-reported assessment of function and only one reported on adverse events (in which three participants receiving a control intervention experienced skin problems from over-the-counter Chinese herbal patches). The other 19 studies did not record or report on adverse events. We assessed the quality of evidence for cure rates as very low for all comparisons, which means we are very uncertain about the reliability of any of the estimates.The single study comparing acupuncture treatment with no treatment found acupuncture to be more effective with regard to cure rate at five days (31/31 versus 1/30; RR 20.34, 95% CI 4.27 to 96.68). Acupuncture plus another standard treatment versus that standard treatment alone was tested in eight studies; with cure rate data available for seven. Most of these studies reported higher cure rates in the acupuncture plus another standard treatment group than in the standard treatment alone group. However, while the results of an exploratory meta-analysis of cure rate data from eight trials testing acupuncture versus no acupuncture tended to favour acupuncture, the results were very inconsistent across the studies and the estimated effect was very imprecise (383/396 versus 272/355; RR 1.32, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.84; P value = 0.1; I(2) = 98%).Fourteen studies compared acupuncture with a variety of other non-surgical treatments, such as Chinese drug patches, hot and cold water, ice packs, oral Chinese herbal medicine and elastic bandage. Some studies found in favour of acupuncture, some in favour of the other treatment and some found a lack of evidence for a difference between the two interventions under test. The results of an exploratory meta-analysis of cure rate data from 11 trials testing acupuncture versus another non-surgical intervention tended to slightly favour acupuncture, but these were not statistically significant and the data were very heterogeneous (404/509 versus 416/497; RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.22; P value = 0.30; I(2) = 92%). The currently available evidence from a very heterogeneous group of randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of acute ankle sprains does not provide reliable support for either the effectiveness or safety of acupuncture treatments, alone or in combination with other non-surgical interventions; or in comparison with other non-surgical interventions. Future rigorous randomised clinical trials with larger sample sizes will be necessary to establish robust clinical evidence concerning the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatment for acute ankle sprains.[CINAHL Note: The Cochrane Collaboration systematic reviews contain interactive software that allows various calculations in the MetaView.]  
  Address  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107769235. Language: English. Entry Date: 20101029. Revision Date: 20151007. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 100909747. Cochrane AN: CD009065. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107769235 Serial 2358  
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Author Neri, I.; Monari, F.; Midwife, C.S.; Facchinetti, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in post-date pregnancy: a pilot study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Matern Fetal Neonat Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 9 Pages 874-878  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor, Induced -- Methods; Pregnancy, Prolonged -- Therapy; Adult; Delivery, Obstetric -- Statistics and Numerical Data; Female; Gestational Age; Human; Labor Presentation; Parity; Pilot Studies; Pregnancy; Time Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address Mother-Infant Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia , Modena , Italy.  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109752076. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20151123. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Obstetric Care. NLM UID: 101136916. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109752076 Serial 2359  
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Author Haddad, N.E.; Palesh, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in the Treatment of Cancer-Related Psychological Symptoms Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 13 Issue 5 Pages 371-385  
  Keywords Rehabilitation, Cancer -- Evaluation; Acupuncture -- Methods; Sleep Disorders -- Therapy; Depression -- Therapy; Psychotic Disorders -- Classification; Psychotic Disorders -- Therapy; Human; Systematic Review; PubMed; Anxiety; Quality of Life  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA  
  Publisher Sage Publications Inc.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103986644. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140822. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. NLM UID: 101128834. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103986644 Serial 2360  
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Author Liu, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can acupuncture prevent and manage dry mouth induced by radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer? Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Focus on Alternative & Complementary Therapies Abbreviated Journal Focus Altern Complement Ther  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 92-93  
  Keywords Low Back Pain -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Disabled; Xerostomia -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Head and Neck Neoplasms -- Radiotherapy; Radiotherapy -- Adverse Effects; Human; Systematic Review; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library  
  Abstract  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103947817. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140527. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; abstract; commentary; research; systematic review. Original Study: Zhuang L, Yang Z, Zeng X, Zhua X, Chen Z, Liu L, Meng Z. The preventive and therapeutic effect of acupuncture for radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review. Integr Cancer Ther 2013; 12: 197–205. . Integr Cancer Ther 2013; 12: 197-205. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. NLM UID: 9806970. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103947817 Serial 2361  
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Author Chan, Y.-Y.; Lo, W.-Y.; Li, T.-C.; Shen, L.-J.; Yang, S.-N.; Chen, Y.-H.; Lin, J.-G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical Efficacy of Acupuncture as an Adjunct to Methadone Treatment Services for Heroin Addicts: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication American Journal of Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chinese Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 3 Pages 569-586  
  Keywords Substance Abusers; Heroin; Methadone -- Administration and Dosage; Neoadjuvant Therapy -- Methods; Electroacupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Taiwan; Chi Square Test; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Analysis of Variance; Paired T-Tests; Step-Wise Multiple Regression; Male; Adult; Female; Funding Source  
  Abstract Scant scientific evidence supports the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of opiate dependence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture for heroin addicts on methadone maintenance by measuring the daily consumption of methadone, variations in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores, and heroin craving. Sixty heroin addicts were randomly assigned to true acupuncture (electroacupuncture at the Hegu [LI4] and Zusanli [ST36] acupoints, as well as acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen) or sham acupuncture (minimal acupuncture at the Hegu and Zusanli acupoints without electrical stimulation and superficial acupuncture at the Ear Shenmen), twice weekly for 4 weeks. From week 2 onwards, the daily dose of methadone was reduced by a significantly greater amount with true acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. True acupuncture was also associated with a greater improvement in sleep latency at follow-up. All adverse events were mild in severity. Acupuncture appears to be a useful adjunct to methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in heroin addiction.  
  Address Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher World Scientific Publishing Company
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103951748. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140603. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Military/Uniformed Services; Psychiatry/Psychology. Instrumentation: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: This work was supported by grant NSC 100-2320-B-039-029-MY2 from the National Science Council, Taipei, Taiwan.. NLM UID: 7901431. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103951748 Serial 2362  
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Author Koog, Y.H.; Lee, J.S.; Wi, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinically meaningful nocebo effect occurs in acupuncture treatment: a systematic review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Clinical Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Epidemiol  
  Volume 67 Issue 8 Pages 858-869  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Adverse Effects; Acupuncture -- Methods; Clinical Trials -- Adverse Effects; Clinical Trials -- Methods; Acupuncture -- Standards; Clinical Trials -- Standards; Human; Placebo Effect; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address Honam Research Center, Medifarm Hospital, YangYul-gil 306, Suncheon 540-300, Republic of Korea.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103978956. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140822. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Public Health; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Public Health. NLM UID: 8801383. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103978956 Serial 2363  
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Author Taylor, P.; Pezzullo, L.; Grant, S.J.; Bensoussan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cost-effectiveness of Acupuncture for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Pain Practice Abbreviated Journal Pain Practice  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages 599-606  
  Keywords Cost Benefit Analysis; Acupuncture -- Economics; Chronic Pain -- Therapy; Low Back Pain -- Therapy; Treatment Outcomes -- Economics; Human; Systematic Review; Meta Analysis; PubMed; Data Analysis Software; Pain Measurement; Health Care Costs  
  Abstract Cost-effectiveness is a major criterion underpinning decisions in mainstream health care. Acupuncture is increasingly used in patients with chronic lower back pain ( LBP), but there is a lack of evidence on cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture in alleviating chronic LBP either alone or in conjunction with standard care compared with patients receiving routine care, and/or sham. To determine effectiveness, we undertook meta-analyses which found a significant improvement in pain in those receiving acupuncture and standard care compared with those receiving standard care alone. For acupuncture and standard care vs. standard care and sham, a weak positive effect was found for weeks 12 to 16, but this was not significant. For acupuncture alone vs. standard care alone, a significant positive effect was found at week 8, but not at weeks 26 or 52. The main outcome parameters for our cost-effectiveness analysis were the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ( ICER) of acupuncture treatment presented as cost (A$) per disability-adjusted life-year ( DALY) saved. The WHO benchmark for a very highly cost-effective intervention is one that costs less than gross domestic product per capita per quality-adjusted life-year ( QALY) gained or DALY averted, or less than around $A52,000 in 2009 (the base year for the analysis). According to this threshold, acupuncture as a complement to standard care for relief of chronic LBP is highly cost-effective, costing around $48,562 per DALY avoided. When comorbid depression is alleviated at the same rate as pain, cost is around $18,960 per DALY avoided. Acupuncture as a substitute for standard care was not found to be cost-effective unless comorbid depression was included. According to the WHO cost-effectiveness threshold values, acupuncture is a cost-effective treatment strategy in patients with chronic LBP.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
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  Notes Accession Number: 103883589. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140912. Revision Date: 20150901. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 101130835. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103883589 Serial 2364  
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Author Ntritsou, V.; Mavrommatis, C.; Kostoglou, C.; Dimitriadis, G.; Tziris, N.; Zagka, P.; Vasilakos, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of perioperative electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy on postoperative analgesia with tramadol and ketamine in prostatectomy: a randomised sham-controlled single-blind trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 215-222  
  Keywords Prostatectomy, Radical -- Methods; Perioperative Care; Postoperative Pain; Analgesia -- Methods; Combined Modality Therapy; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Tramadol -- Administration and Dosage; Ketamine -- Administration and Dosage; Outcome Assessment; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Patient Satisfaction; Adverse Drug Event; Double-Blind Studies; Placebos; Descriptive Statistics; Random Assignment; McGill Pain Questionnaire; Questionnaires; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Male; Middle Age; Aged; Power Analysis; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Data Analysis Software; Summated Rating Scaling  
  Abstract Objectives: To study the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) as perioperative adjunctive therapy added to a systemic analgesic strategy (including tramadol and ketamine) for postoperative pain, opioid-related side effects and patient satisfaction. Methods: In a sham-controlled participant- and observer-blinded trial, 75 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) EA (n=37; tramadol+ketamine +EA) and (2) control (n=38; tramadol+ketamine). EA (100 Hz frequency) was applied at LI4 bilaterally during the closure of the abdominal walls and EA (4 Hz) was applied at ST36 and LI4 bilaterally immediately after extubation. The control group had sham acupuncture without penetration or stimulation. The following outcomes were evaluated: postoperative pain using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and McGill Scale (SFMPQ), mechanical pain thresholds using algometer application close to the wound, cortisol measurements, rescue analgesia, Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-6 item), patient satisfaction and opioid side effects. Results: Pain scores on the NRS and SFMPQ were significantly lower and electronic pressure algometer measurements were significantly higher in the EA group than in the control group (p<0.001) at all assessments. In the EA group a significant decrease in rescue analgesia was observed at 45 min (p<0.001) and a significant decrease in cortisol levels was also observed (p<0.05). Patients expressed satisfaction with the analgesia, especially in the EA group (p<0.01). Significant delays in the start of bowel movements were observed in the control group at 45 min (p<0.001) and 2 h (p<0.05). Conclusions: Adding EA perioperatively should be considered an option as part of a multimodal analgesic strategy.  
  Address Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Thessaloniki “Ahepa”, Thessaloniki, Greece  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
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  Notes Accession Number: 103977176. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Commentary: Usichenko T. I., Streitberger K. Perioperative acupuncture: why are we not using it? (ACUPUNCTURE MED) Jun2014; 32 (3): 212-214. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) (Spielberger); Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); McGill Pain Questionnaire; Present Pain Intensity Scale (PPI). NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977176 Serial 2365  
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Author Cotchett, M.P.; Munteanu, S.E.; Landorf, K.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal Phys Ther  
  Volume 94 Issue 8 Pages 1083-1094  
  Keywords Trigger Point; Heel Pain -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Needles -- Utilization; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Pain Measurement; Visual Analog Scaling; Scales; Treatment Outcomes; Clinical Assessment Tools; Questionnaires; Psychological Tests; Outcome Assessment; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials; Single-Blind Studies; Placebos; Confidence Intervals; Summated Rating Scaling; Data Analysis Software; P-Value; Analysis of Covariance; T-Tests; Sample Size; Adult; Female; Male; Human; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points; however, there is only poor-quality evidence supporting its use. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Design. The study was a parallel-group, participant-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted in a university health sciences clinic. Patients. Study participants were 84 patients with plantar heel pain of at least 1 month’s duration. Intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to receive real or sham trigger point dry needling. The intervention consisted of 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks. Participants were followed for 12 weeks. Measurements . Primary outcome measures included first-step pain, as measured with a visual analog scale (VAS), and foot pain, as measured with the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ). The primary end point for predicting the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain was 6 weeks. Results. At the primary end point, significant effects favored real dry needling over sham dry needling for pain (adjusted mean difference: VAS first-step pain= -14.4 mm, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = -23.5 to -5.2; FHSQ foot pain= 10.0 points, 95% CI=1.0 to 19-1), although the between-group difference was lower than the minimal important difference. The number needed to treat at 6 weeks was 4 (95% CI=2 to 12). The frequency of minor transitory adverse events was significantly greater in the real dry needling group (70 real dry needling appointments [32%] compared with only 1 sham dry needling appointment [<1%]). Limitations. It was not possible to blind the therapist. Conclusion. Dry needling provided statistically significant reductions in plantar heel pain, but the magnitude of this effect should be considered against the frequency of minor transitory adverse events.  
  Address Department of Podiatry and Lower Extremity and Gait Studies Program, La Trobe University  
  Publisher Oxford University Press / USA
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107870439. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140807. Revision Date: 20150820. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ); Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) Version 2; Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ); Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire. Grant Information: This study was fun ded by the Australian Podiatry Education and Research Foundation (APERF).. NLM UID: 0022623. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107870439 Serial 2366  
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Author Al Rashoud, A.S.; Abboud, R.J.; Wang, W.; Wigderowitz, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of low-level laser therapy applied at acupuncture points in knee osteoarthritis: a randomised double-blind comparative trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physiotherapy Abbreviated Journal Physiotherapy  
  Volume 100 Issue 3 Pages 242-248  
  Keywords Osteoarthritis, Knee -- Therapy; Laser Therapy -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Combined Modality Therapy; Clinical Assessment Tools; Visual Analog Scaling; Scales; Treatment Outcomes; Disability Evaluation; Randomized Controlled Trials; Double-Blind Studies; Placebos; Descriptive Statistics; Confidence Intervals; Mann-Whitney U Test; Human  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied to acupuncture points on the knee joint in combination with exercise and advice in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Design: Randomised, double-blind, comparative clinical trial. Participants: Forty-nine patients with knee osteoarthritis were assigned at random into two groups: active laser group (n = 26) and placebo laser group (n = 23). Intervention: Using a gallium aluminium arsenide laser device, patients received either active or placebo LLLT at five acupuncture points on the affected knee during nine sessions. Outcome measures: Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Saudi Knee Function Scale (SKFS) at baseline, the fifth treatment session, the last treatment session, 6 weeks post intervention and 6 months post intervention. Results: VAS scores showed a significant improvement in the active laser group compared with the placebo laser group at 6 weeks post intervention [mean difference -1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference -2.4 to -0.3; P = 0.014] and 6 months post intervention (mean difference -1.8, 95% CI of the difference -3.0 to -0.7; P = 0.003) using the independent samples test. SKFS scores also showed a significant improvement in the active laser group compared with the placebo laser group at the last treatment session (median difference -15, 95% CI of the difference -27 to -2; P = 0.035) and 6 months post intervention (median difference -21, 95% CI of the difference -34 to -7; P = 0.006) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that short-term application of LLLT to specific acupuncture points in association with exercise and advice is effective in reducing pain and improving quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
  Address Institute of Motion Analysis and Research, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109837763. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150913. Revision Date: 20150923. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Blind Peer Reviewed; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Physical Therapy. Instrumentation: Saudi Knee Function Scale (SKFS). NLM UID: 0401223. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109837763 Serial 2367  
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Author Zhaodi Zhang; Changsong Wang; Quanyi Li; Mingyue Zhang; Haifang Zhao; Linlin Dong; Guonian Wang; Yan Jin url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture at ST36 accelerates the recovery of gastrointestinal motility after colorectal surgery: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 223-226  
  Keywords Colorectal Neoplasms -- Surgery; Postoperative Care; Recovery; Gastrointestinal Motility -- Standards; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Time; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Aged; Middle Age; Data Analysis Software; T-Tests; Mann-Whitney U Test; Chi Square Test; Fisher's Exact Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract Objectives: To evaluate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST36 can accelerate the recovery of gastrointestinal motility after colorectal surgery. Methods: Forty patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II and III undergoing elective open resection of malignant colorectal tumours were included in this study. Using a sealed envelope method, the patients were randomly divided into two groups either receiving EA (EA group) or sham EA (SEA group). Data regarding the recovery of bowel function (times to the first bowel sounds, passage of flatus and defaecation) were collected and analysed. Results: In the EA group, the time intervals from surgery to the first bowel movement and passage of flatus were shorter than in the SEA group (13±10 h vs 19±13 h, p<0.05 and 23 ±14 h vs 32±18 h, p<0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the time to first defaecation (68±45 h vs 72±53 h, p>0.05). Conclusions: EA at ST36 accelerates the recovery of gastrointestinal motility after colorectal surgery.  
  Address Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103977177. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Grant Information: Financial support for this research was received from Heilong Jiang Postdoctoral Fund (No LBH-Z12212), the Foundation of Heilongjiang Health Committee (No 20120683) and a Fund from the Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University (No JJ2 2011-2015).. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977177 Serial 2368  
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Author Plaster, R.; Vieira, W.B.; Alencar, F.A.D.; Nakano, E.Y.; Liebano, R.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 236-241  
  Keywords Osteoarthritis, Knee -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Electroacupuncture -- Methods; Pain; Physical Mobility; Muscle Strength; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Descriptive Statistics; Brazil; Female; Male; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Dynamometry; Intrarater Reliability; Sample Size Determination; Two-Way Analysis of Variance; Pretest-Posttest Design; Data Analysis Software; Clinical Assessment Tools  
  Abstract Objective: To compare the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients with knee osteoarthritis, with a pain intensity of ?2 on the pain Numerical Rating Scale, were included. The patients were randomised into two groups: manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture. Pain intensity, degree of dysfunction (Timed Up and Go (TUG) test), maximal voluntary isometric contraction and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after a single session of manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture treatments. Results: Both groups showed a significant reduction in pain intensity (p<0.001) and time to run the TUG test after the acupuncture treatment (p=0.005 for the manual acupuncture group and p=0.002 for the electroacupuncture group). There were no differences between the groups regarding pain intensity (p=0.25), TUG test (p=0.70), maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p=0.43) or pressure pain threshold (p=0.27). Conclusions: This study found no difference between the immediate effects of a single session of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on pain, muscle strength and mobility in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
  Address Departamento de Estatística, Universidade de Brasília (UnB), Brasília, DF, Brazil  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103977173. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Timed 'Up and Go' Test (TUG); Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977173 Serial 2369  
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Author Yongfang Guo; Mingqing Xing; Wenjuan Sun; Xiaoyan Yuan; Hongyan Dai; Huamin Ding url  doi
openurl 
  Title Plasma nesfatin-1 level in obese patients after acupuncture: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 313-317  
  Keywords Obesity -- Blood; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Nerve Tissue Proteins -- Blood; Calcium Binding Proteins -- Blood; Proteins -- Blood; Treatment Outcomes; Randomized Controlled Trials; Human; Male; Female; Data Analysis Software; T-Tests; Mann-Whitney U Test; Descriptive Statistics; Pearson's Correlation Coefficient; Middle Age; Adult; Funding Source  
  Abstract Background Nesfatin-1 is an anorexigenic hormone suggested to regulate obesity. Objective To investigate the relationship between nesfatin-1 level and anthropometric and metabolic parameters in obese patients, and examine the change in plasma nesfatin-1 level after acupuncture treatment. Methods 64 obese adult patients without diabetes and 58 normal weight control subjects were enrolled in this study. The obese patients were randomly divided into an acupuncture plus diet group (n=32) and a diet only group (n=32). Measurements were repeated after 45 days. Results Body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences, serum insulin, lipoprotein and insulin resistance measures were significantly higher, and plasma nesfatin-1 level was significantly lower, in obese patients than in normal weight controls. In addition, negative correlations were found between plasma nesfatin-1 level and BMI, waist and hip circumferences. Weight reduction in participants after acupuncture and diet restriction was 7.0% and 4.3%, respectively. Plasma nesfatin-1 level increased from 2.75±1.16 to 3.44±1.28 ng/mL and from 2.86±1.07 to 3.23±1.06 ng/mL in acupuncture and diet groups, respectively; the difference was significant, p<0.05. Conclusions Plasma nesfatin-1 level is reduced in obese adults, and is increased after acupuncture. The beneficial effect of acupuncture on obesity is associated with increased plasma nesfatin-1 level.  
  Address Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103988642. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140815. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Grant Information: National Natural Science Foundation of China.. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103988642 Serial 2370  
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Author Dascanio, V.; Birks, Y.; Clark, L.; Fairhurst, C.; MacPherson, H.; Torgerson, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized cohort trial was shown to be feasible for evaluating treatments in low back pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Clinical Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Epidemiol  
  Volume 67 Issue 8 Pages 940-946  
  Keywords Clinical Trials -- Methods; Low Back Pain -- Therapy; Acupuncture; Adult; Clinical Assessment Tools; Clinical Trials -- Standards; Female; Great Britain; Human; Male; Middle Age; Patient Selection; Physical Therapy; Pilot Studies; Prospective Studies; Quality of Life; Questionnaires; Young Adult  
  Abstract Objective: To investigate the feasibility of conducting a cohort, factorial randomized controlled trial (RCT) in the treatment of patients with low back pain (LBP). Study Design and Setting: Pragmatic feasibility factorial RCT nested within an observational cohort study in two general practices in York, United Kingdom. Results: Eight hundred forty-five patients aged between 18 and 65 years who had consulted their general practitioner about LBP within the preceding 12 months were mailed an invitation to participate in a cohort trial, with the possibility of later joining a treatment RCT. One hundred twenty-four patients consented to participate in the cohort and treatment trial, and one consented only to the cohort only. Ultimately, 59 patients were randomized into the nested RCT. Outcomes included recruitment, acceptability, and attrition rates as measures of the feasibility of the design and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. No statistically significant differences in outcome between treatment groups and usual care were found. Conclusions: The design was feasible for the evaluation of different back pain treatments. We found zero attrition after randomization and showed that for a remitting relapsing condition, the design allows us to recruit initially ineligible patients from the cohort. Additional statistical analysis using regression discontinuity can also be used with this design.  
  Address York Trials Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, YO10 5DD. Electronic address: david.torgerson@york.ac.uk.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103961544. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140822. Revision Date: 20170411. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Public Health; USA. Special Interest: Public Health. Instrumentation: Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ). NLM UID: 8801383. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103961544 Serial 2371  
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Author Garrow, A.P.; Mei Xing; Vere, J.; Verrall, B.; LiFen Wang; Jude, E.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Role of acupuncture in the management of diabetic painful neuropathy (DPN): a pilot RCT Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 242-249  
  Keywords Diabetic Neuropathies -- Therapy; Acupuncture Analgesia -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Descriptive Statistics; Acupuncture Points; Scales; Pilot Studies; Visual Analog Scaling; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Effect Size; Placebos; Adolescence; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Female; Male; Funding Source  
  Abstract Aims: To examine the role of acupuncture in the treatment of diabetic painful neuropathy (DPN) using a single-blind, placebo-controlled RCT and to collect data that would be required in a future definitive study of the efficacy of acupuncture in DPN. Methods: 45 patients were allocated to receive a 10-week course either of real (53%) or sham (47%) acupuncture. Five standardised acupuncture points on the lower limb of each leg were used in the study: LR3, KI3, SP6, SP10 and ST36. Outcome measures included the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) scale, lower limb pain (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS); Sleep Problem Scale (SPS); Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP); 36-item Short Form 36 Health Survey and resting blood pressure (BP). Results: Over the 10-week treatment period, small improvements were seen in VAS ?15 (?26 to ?3.5), MYMOP ?0.89 (?1.4 to ?0.3), SPS ?2.5 (?4.2 to ?0.82) and resting diastolic BP ?5.2 (?10.4 to ?0.14) in the true acupuncture group. In contrast, there was little change in those receiving sham acupuncture. A moderate treatment effect in favour of active acupuncture was detected in MYMOP scores ?0.66 (?0.96 to ?0.35) but nonsignificant effect sizes in LANSS Pain Scale ?0.37 (?2.2 to 1.4), resting diastolic BP ?0.50 (?3.0 to 1.99) and the SPS ?0.51 (?2.2 to 1.16). Conclusions We have demonstrated the practicality and feasibility of acupuncture as an additional treatment for people with DPN. The treatment was well tolerated with no appreciable side effects. Larger randomised trials are needed to confirm the clinical and cost-effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of DPN.  
  Address Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Diabetes Centre, Tameside General Hospital, Ashton-Under-Lyne, Greater Manchester, UK; School of Clinical and Laboratory Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, Greater Manchester, UK  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103977178. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140725. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP); Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) Pain Scale (Bennett); Sleep Problem Scale (SPS)(Jenkins et al). Grant Information: funded by This study received funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) Programme (grant reference number PBPG-0706-10595).. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103977178 Serial 2372  
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Author Cheng, H.-C.; Hsieh, Y.-T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of low-concentration atropine combined with auricular acupoint stimulation in myopia control Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 449-455  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture, Ear; Atropine -- Administration and Dosage; Atropine -- Therapeutic Use; Myopia -- Drug Therapy; Child; Female; Human; Male; Myopia -- Epidemiology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of myopia control between patients treated with low-concentration atropine eye drops combined with auricular acupoint stimulation and those treated with atropine alone. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: Single-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial in a regional teaching hospital. INTERVENTIONS: The patients received either topical 0.125% atropine nightly plus auricular acupoint stimulation (0.125A+ACU group) or topical 0.125% atropine alone nightly (0.125A group). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The changes in spherical equivalent (SE), axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and intraocular pressure (IOP) per year were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Seventy-three of 110 total patients (66.4%) completed at least 6 months of follow-up. Patients in the 0.125A+ACU group had less myopic progression and AL elongation (-0.41 diopter and 0.24mm/year) than those in the 0.125A group (-0.66 diopter and 0.32mm/year) (mean follow-up 14.7 months, p<0.0001 and p=0.02, respectively). The ACD increased more in the 0.125A+ACU group than in the 0.125A group (0.076mm vs. 0.023mm/year, p=0.0004). IOP decreased more in the 0.125A+ACU group than in the 0.125A group (-1.01mmHg vs. -0.13mmHg/year, p=0.007). A decrease of 1mmHg of IOP correlated with a decrease of myopic progression of 0.021 diopter/year (p=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated with 0.125% atropine eye drops plus auricular acupoint stimulation had less myopic progression, less axial length elongation, more anterior chamber deepening, and greater IOP reductions than those treated with 0.125% atropine alone. Auricular acupoint stimulation in combination with low-concentration topical atropine was beneficial for myopia control.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan; Department of Ophthalmology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: ythyth@gmail.com.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103827662. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103827662 Serial 2373  
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Author Cheong, K.B.; Zhang, J.-ping; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture in postoperative gastroparesis syndrome--a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 767-786  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Gastroparesis -- Therapy; Postoperative Complications -- Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Adult; Aged; Cochrane Library; Female; Gastroparesis -- Epidemiology; Human; Male; Meta Analysis; Middle Age; Postoperative Complications -- Epidemiology; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review; Treatment Outcomes  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postoperative gastroparesis syndrome (PGS) which is mainly manifested as delayed gastric emptying is often caused by upper abdominal and sometimes lower abdominal surgery. In view of the side effects of drugs therapy, the search of supplementary and alternative has been of increasing interest. OBJECTIVE: This paper included a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of acupuncture and acupoints selection in PGS. Quality for meta-analysis was evaluated using GRADE while each trial was assessed with CONSORT and STRICTA for TCM. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with non-acupuncture treatment were identified from databases PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane, CNKI and Wanfangdata. Meta-analysis on eligible studies was performed using fixed-effects model with RevMan 5.2. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 348 studies reviewed, 16 RCTs met the inclusion criteria for review while 7 RCTs, 188 patients (intervention) and 182 patients (control) met the criteria for meta-analysis. Both acupuncture and acupuncture combined with medication showed significant higher total effective rate than control (usual care/medication); with (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13, 1.44; P<0.0001) and (RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.18, 1.58; P<0.0001) respectively. All included RCTs reported positive effect of acupuncture in PGS treatment. ST36, CV12 and PC6 seemed to be the common acupoints selected. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested acupuncture might be effective to improve PGS, however, a definite conclusion could not be drawn due to low quality of trials. Further large-scale, high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to validate this. STUDY REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42013005485.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: nanfanglihuang@163.com.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103848872. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103848872 Serial 2374  
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