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Author Jing-Yu Tan; Molassiotis, A.; Tao Wang; Suen, L.K.P. url  openurl
  Title Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; Psycinfo; AMED Database; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address The Second Affiliated People's Hospital, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 13 Hudong Road, Gulou District, Fuzhou 350003, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876630. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876630 Serial 2397  
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Author Yukiko Shiro; Arai, Y.-C.P.; Tatsunori Ikemoto; Takashi Kawai; Masahiko Ikeuchi; Takahiro Ushida url  openurl
  Title Distal Traditional Acupuncture Points of the Large Intestinal Meridian and the Stomach Meridian Differently Affect Heart Rate Variability and Oxygenation of the Trapezius Muscle Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Intestine, Large -- Analysis; Stomach -- Analysis; Heart Rate Variability; Trapezius Muscles; Oxygenation; Acupressure; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Female; Hemoglobins; Single-Blind Studies; Adult; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Electrocardiography; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Friedman Test; Biological Markers; Blood Circulation  
  Abstract  
  Address Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 21 Karimata, Nagakutecho, Aichigun, Aichi 480-1195, Japan  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876481. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876481 Serial 2398  
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Author Huanqin Li; Huilin Liu; Cunzhi Liu; Guangxia Shi; Wei Zhou; Chengmei Zhao; Tao Zhang; Xuefei Wang; Guiling Wang; Yin Zhao; Jingqing Sun; Jing Wang; Linpeng Wang url  openurl
  Title Effect of 'Deqi' during the Study of Needling 'Wang's Jiaji' Acupoints Treating Spasticity after Stroke Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Muscle Spasticity -- Drug Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Stroke -- Therapy; Stroke -- Symptoms; Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Sensation -- Evaluation; Human; Multicenter Studies; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Single-Blind Studies; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Glasgow Coma Scale; Scales; NIH Stroke Scale; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Outcomes Research; Outcome Assessment; Barthel Index; Chi Square Test; Nonparametric Statistics; Fisher's Exact Test; Data Analysis Software; Two-Tailed Test  
  Abstract  
  Address Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Fangshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 151 Chengguan South Street, Fangshan District, Beijing 102400, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876776. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Gerontologic Care. Instrumentation: NIH Stroke Scale; Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale; Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA); Barthel Index; Stroke-Specific Quality of Life scale (SSQOL); Rankin Scale; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876776 Serial 2399  
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Author Xiaochen Yang; Xingjiang Xiong; Guoyan Yang; Jie Wang url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of Stimulation of Acupoint KI 1 by Artemisia vulgaris (Moxa) for the Treatment of Essential Hypertension: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Hypertension -- Therapy; Moxibustion -- Utilization; Hypertension -- Drug Therapy; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Acupuncture -- Utilization; Human; Systematic Review; Randomized Controlled Trials; PubMed; Embase; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Meta Analysis; Chi Square Test; Confidence Intervals; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876417. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; pictorial; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, no. 2003CB517103) and the National Natural Science Foundation Project of China (no. 90209011).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876417 Serial 2400  
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Author Gang Wang; Qian Gao; Jingshan Hou; Jun Li url  openurl
  Title Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Myofascial Pain Syndromes -- Therapy; Trapezius Muscles -- Pathology; Heat; Treatment Outcomes; Human; China; Randomized Controlled Trials; Visual Analog Scaling; Pain Threshold; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Male; Female; Young Adult; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Needles; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; Funding Source  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,The Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876723. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Grant Information: National Natural Science Foundation Fund of China for study on quantitative evaluation system of myofascial tension band; Wu JiePing Medical Foundation (320.6750.1234).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876723 Serial 2401  
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Author Shuming Li; Tong Shen; Yongshan Liang; Ying Zhang; Bo Bai url  openurl
  Title Miniscalpel-Needle versus Steroid Injection for Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Plantar Fasciitis -- Therapy; Acupuncture -- Methods; Needles; Randomized Controlled Trials; China; Human; Injections; Treatment Outcomes; Steroids; Acupuncture -- Equipment and Supplies; Descriptive Statistics; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Data Analysis Software; Male; Female; Middle Age; Adult; Aged; Visual Analog Scaling  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Orthopaedics Medicine,The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, No. 151, Yanjiang West Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876402. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Pain and Pain Management. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876402 Serial 2402  
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Author Yang, M.; Yang, J.; Zeng, F.; Liu, P.; Lai, Z.; Deng, S.; Fang, L.; Song, W.; Xie, H.; Liang, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture stimulation at sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint induced distinct brain glucose metabolism change in migraineurs: a PET-CT study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Translational Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Transl Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 351-351  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has analgesic effect to most pain conditions. Many neuroimaging studies were conducted to explore acupoint specificity in pain and other condition, but till now there is still discrepancy. Based on our previous finding, this study investigated the brain metabolism changes of acupuncture analgesia induced by sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint stimulation.Methods: 30 migraineurs were included and randomly assigned to 3 groups: Acupuncture Group (AG), Sham Acupuncture Group (SAG) and Migraine Group (MG). In AG, a combination sub-specific points of Shaoyang meridians, Luxi (TE19), San Yangluo (TE8), and Xi Yangguan (GB33) has been stimulated with electroacupuncture, while non-acupoints for SAG were used and MG received no treatment. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) was used to identify differences in brain glucose metabolism between groups.Results: In the AG, brain glucose metabolism increase compared with the MG was observed in the middle frontal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, the precuneus, parahippocampus, cerebellum and middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and decrease were observed in the left hemisphere of Middle Temporal Cortex (MTC).In the SAG, compared with MG, glucose metabolism increased in the poster cingulate cortex (PCC), insula, inferior temporal gyrus, MTC, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, fusiform, inferior parietal lobe, superior parietal lobe, supramarginal gyrus, middle occipital lobe, angular and precuneus; while, decreased in cerebellum, parahippocampus.Conclusions: Acupuncture stimulation at both sub-specific acupoint and non-acupoint yields ameliorating effect to migraine pain, but with evidently differed central mechanism as measured by PET-CT. The pattern of brain glucose metabolism change in acupoint is pertinent and targeted, while in non-acupoint that was disordered and randomized. These finding may provide new perspectives into the validation of acupoint specificity, optimizing acupuncture analgesia and revealing central mechanism of acupuncture analgesia by neuroimaging measurement.Trial Registration: This trial was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, with registration no. ChiCTR-TRC-11001813.  
  Address  
  Publisher BioMed Central
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 109725652. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150123. Revision Date: 20160721. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Europe; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 101190741. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109725652 Serial 2403  
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Author Soyeon Cheon; Xiuyu Zhang; In-Seon Lee; Seung-Hun Cho; Younbyoung Chae; Hyangsook Lee url  openurl
  Title Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Neoplasms -- Therapy; Drug Administration -- Methods; Acupuncture Points; Medicine, Herbal; Iatrogenic Disease -- Therapy; Neoplasms -- Complications; Human; South Korea; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Systematic Review; Alternative Therapies; Funding Source; Treatment Outcomes; Research Methodology -- Evaluation; Study Design -- Evaluation; Descriptive Statistics; Nausea and Vomiting -- Therapy; Meta Analysis; Chemotherapy, Cancer -- Adverse Effects; Statistical Significance; Odds Ratio; Confidence Intervals; Cancer Pain -- Prevention and Control; Hiccup -- Prevention and Control; Fever -- Prevention and Control; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials -- Evaluation; PubMed; Embase; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Publication Bias -- Evaluation; Graphics; Data Analysis Software; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Intestinal Obstruction; Gastrointestinal System -- Pathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee Dae-ro 26, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876834. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; meta analysis; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Oncologic Care. Grant Information: This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean government (Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning) (no. 2013R1A6A6029251) and a Grant from the National R & D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (1020330).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876834 Serial 2404  
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Author Shaoqing Wang; Zhaohui Chen; Ping Fu; Li Zang; Li Wang; Xi Zhai; Fang Gao; Aijing Huang; Yao Zhang url  openurl
  Title Use of Auricular Acupressure to Improve the Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients with Chronic Kidney Diseases: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords Acupuncture, Ear; Quality of Life; Diabetic Patients; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic -- Therapy; Ear; Acupuncture Points; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials; Random Assignment; Treatment Outcomes; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated -- Analysis; Glycemic Control; Glomerular Filtration Rate; China; Academic Medical Centers; Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Questionnaires; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 -- Drug Therapy; Renal Insufficiency, Chronic -- Classification; Hemodialysis; Activities of Daily Living; Health Status; Social Behavior; Psychological Well-Being; Analysis of Covariance; Descriptive Statistics; Chi Square Test; P-Value; Confidence Intervals; Acupuncture, Ear -- Adverse Effects; Visual Analog Scaling; Effect Size; Self Report; Scales; Placebo Effect; Human  
  Abstract  
  Address Nephrology Department,The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, Sichuan 610513, China  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876515. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36); Kidney Disease and Quality of Life Short-Form (KDQOL-SF). NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876515 Serial 2405  
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Author Badiee Aval, S.; Ravanshad, Y.; Azarfar, A.; Mehrad-Majd, H.; Torabi, S.; Ravanshad, S. url  openurl
  Title A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Using Acupuncture and Acupressure for Uremic Pruritus Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases Abbreviated Journal Iran J Kidney Dis  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 78-83  
  Keywords  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Uremic pruritus is characterized by an uncomfortable and unlimited sensation which leads to scratch, which strongly reduces the quality of life. Pruritus is a common symptom in patients with end-stage renal disease. Various clinical trial studies have examined the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on treatment of uremic pruritus. This systematic review meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness based on published studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted to identify appropriate trial studies. The results for continuous outcomes were presented as weighted mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: A total of 5 articles, including 6 trials, were enrolled in this systematic review. Only 3 of the six trial studies used a visual analogue scale score for assessing pruritus and acupressure for intervention regime, which were considered for meta-analysis. The combined results showed that acupuncture or acupressure was effective in treatment of uremic pruritus (pooled mean difference, -1.994; 95% confidence interval, -2.544 to -1.445). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that using acupuncture and acupressure is effective in treatment of uremic pruritus. However, further vigorous studies are needed to verify these findings.  
  Address Clinical Research Unit, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. ravanshady@mums.ac.ir  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29507269 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2425  
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Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Lee, M.S.; Wang, L.-Q.; Hay, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for depression Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages Cd004046  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is recognised as a major public health problem that has a substantial impact on individuals and on society. People with depression may consider using complementary therapies such as acupuncture, and an increasing body of research has been undertaken to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression. This is the second update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression.To determine:* Whether acupuncture is more effective than treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than control acupuncture for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than pharmacological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture plus pharmacological therapy is more effective than pharmacological therapy alone for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than psychological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Adverse effects of acupuncture compared with treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control, control acupuncture, pharmacological therapies, and psychological therapies for treatment of individuals with depression. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases to June 2016: Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR), Korean Studies Information Service System (KISS), DBPIA (Korean article database website), Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Research Information Service System (RISS), Korea Med, Korean Medical Database (KM base), and Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), as well as several Korean medical journals. SELECTION CRITERIA: Review criteria called for inclusion of all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture versus control acupuncture, no treatment, medication, other structured psychotherapies (cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychotherapy, or counselling), or standard care. Modes of treatment included acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and laser acupuncture. Participants included adult men and women with depression diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), or Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders Third Edition Revised (CCMD-3-R). If necessary, we used trial authors' definitions of depressive disorder. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcomes were reduction in the severity of depression, measured by self-rating scales or by clinician-rated scales, and improvement in depression, defined as remission versus no remission. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE method. MAIN RESULTS: This review is an update of previous versions and includes 64 studies (7104 participants). Most studies were at high risk of performance bias, at high or unclear risk of detection bias, and at low or unclear risk of selection bias, attrition bias, reporting bias, and other bias.Acupuncture versus no treatment/wait list/treatment as usualWe found low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture (manual and electro-) may moderately reduce the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.66, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.25, five trials, 488 participants). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.35 to 2.24, one trial, 302 participants; low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus control acupuncture (invasive, non-invasive sham controls)Acupuncture may be associated with a small reduction in the severity of depression of 1.69 points on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) by end of treatment (95% CI -3.33 to -0.05, 14 trials, 841 participants; low-quality evidence). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 1.63, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.86, five trials, 300 participants; moderate-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus medicationWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture may confer small benefit in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.05, 31 trials, 3127 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different classes of medications and different modes of acupuncture stimulation. Very low-quality evidence suggests lower ratings of adverse events following acupuncture compared with medication alone, as measured by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (mean difference (MD) -4.32, 95% CI -7.41 to -1.23, three trials, 481 participants).Acupuncture plus medication versus medication aloneWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture is highly beneficial in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.66, 11 trials, 775 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different modes of acupuncture stimulation. It is unclear whether differences in adverse events are associated with different modes of acupuncture (SMD -1.32, 95% CI -2.86 to 0.23, three trials, 200 participants; very low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus psychological therapyIt is unclear whether data show differences between acupuncture and psychological therapy in the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.5, 95% CI -1.33 to 0.33, two trials, 497 participants; low-quality evidence). Low-quality evidence suggests no differences between groups in rates of adverse events (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.33, one trial, 452 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in severity of depression was less when acupuncture was compared with control acupuncture than when acupuncture was compared with no treatment control, although in both cases, results were rated as providing low-quality evidence. The reduction in severity of depression with acupuncture given alone or in conjunction with medication versus medication alone is uncertain owing to the very low quality of evidence. The effect of acupuncture compared with psychological therapy is unclear. The risk of adverse events with acupuncture is also unclear, as most trials did not report adverse events adequately. Few studies included follow-up periods or assessed important outcomes such as quality of life. High-quality randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to examine the clinical efficacy and acceptability of acupuncture, as well as its effectiveness, compared with acupuncture controls, medication, or psychological therapies.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29502347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2426  
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Author Tang, S.; Mo, Z.; Zhang, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). METHODS: Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for LDH. A meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 and the evidence level was assessed using GRADE methodology. RESULTS: Thirty RCTs involving 3503 participants were included in the study. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had a higher total effective rate than lumbar traction (RR=1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15; p<0.001), ibuprofen (RR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.48; p=0.02), diclofenac sodium (RR=1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.67; p<0.001) and meloxicam (RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.31; p=0.01). Acupuncture was also better than lumbar traction (SMD -1.33, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.84; p<0.001) and diclofenac sodium (SMD -1.36, 95% CI -2.59 to -0.13; p=0.03) in terms ofvisual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and better than lumbar traction (SMD 0.96, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.45; p=0.0001) with respect toJapanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. In addition, the total effective rate in five individual trials was greater for acupuncture than for mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, ibuprofen plus fugui gutong capsule, loxoprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone and huoxue zhitong decoction, respectively. Additionally, two individual trials showed a superior effect of acupuncture in VAS scores comparedwith ibuprofen or mannitol plus dexamethasone, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture showed a more favourable effect in the treatment of LDH than lumbar traction, ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, meloxicam, mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, fugui gutong capsule plus ibuprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone, loxoprofen and huoxue zhitong decoction. However, further rigorously designed, large-scale RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29496679 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2427  
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Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category (up) OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2428  
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Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 30  
  Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom  
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  Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2429  
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Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
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  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2430  
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Author Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
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  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2431  
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Author Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
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  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2432  
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Author Guo, T.; Chen, Z.; Tai, X.; Liu, Z.; Zhu, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Space-time acupuncture for intractable cough after lupus nephropathy: A case report and literature review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 51 Pages e9309  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Chronic Disease; Cough/*therapy; Fatigue/therapy; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/therapy; Lupus Nephritis/*complications; Middle Aged  
  Abstract RATIONALE: Some intractable chronic cough remains a common complaint for seeking medical care. Unexplained cough in lupus nephropathy patient is rare and therapeutic options are limited. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 57 year-old woman with a 7-year history of lupus nephropathy. She has suffered from chronic cough for 3 years accompanied with chronic low back pain and fatigue, as the conventional therapy cannot relieve the symptoms. DIAGNOSES: The woman is diagnosed as intractable cough after lupus nephropathy. INTERVENTIONS: 9 times space-time acupuncture (STA) treatment was performed. OUTCOMES: The cough, as well as other uncomfortable symptoms like chronic low-back pain and fatigue have resolved, and no relapse for one year follow-up. LESSONS: STA may be an effective therapy to treat intractable chronic cough.  
  Address Curie Medical School,Universityof Paris, Paris, France  
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  Notes PMID:29390501; PMCID:PMC5758203 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2433  
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Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
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  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2434  
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Author Chubak, B.; Doctor, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sexual Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sex Med Rev  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Chinese Herbal Drugs; Meditation; Sexual Dysfunction; Traditional Chinese Medicine; Yoga  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite the growing popularity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the Western world, biomedical students and practitioners struggle to understand TCM and how it relates to their standard diagnosis and treatment practices. AIMS: To describe the fundamentals of TCM theory and practice relevant to sexual dysfunction; to review and critique the current state of TCM research within Western biomedical literature; and to identify sites for improvement of future research and for collaborative integration of TCM and biomedicine in practice. METHODS: Information about TCM from an insider perspective was obtained from English-language textbooks and lectures intended to teach Western students its theory and practice. PubMed search using Medical Subject Heading terms for Western sexual diagnoses and TCM treatments was performed in April and October 2017 to represent the evidence for TCM in Western biomedical literature. Articles in non-English languages and without human subjects were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 27 studies were included in this review. The most commonly studied intervention was acupuncture. An equal number of studies addressed sexual dysfunction in men and women, but only women were included in studies of physically passive mindfulness meditation. RESULTS: Compared with Western biomedicine, TCM offers a more interdisciplinary and individualized approach to disease and its treatment. This embrace of individual idiosyncrasy in diagnosis and treatment presents a challenge to Western biomedical research norms that rely almost exclusively on quantitative methods that compare large and homogeneous groups with a fixed diagnosis and treatment regimen. CONCLUSION: TCM offers a very different understanding of the human body, health, and disease from Western biomedicine. There is value in the study and application of these 2 medical systems, particularly for biopsychosocial problems of sexual dysfunction. However, this must be done cautiously, with attention to appropriate study design, to avoid shallow and unscientific cultural appropriation of TCM practices. Chubak B, Doctor A. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence. Sex Med Rev 2018;X:XXX-XXX.  
  Address Wellpoints, New York, NY, USA  
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  Notes PMID:29371144 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2435  
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