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Author (down) Zuppa, C.; Prado, C.H. do; Wieck, A.; Zaparte, A.; Barbosa, A.; Bauer, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for sleep quality, BDNF levels and immunosenescence: a randomized controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume 587 Issue Pages 35-40  
  Keywords Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic; Sleep Disorders; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Aging; Depression; Geriatrics; Sleep Quality; Immunity; Immunosenescence; Immunodeficiency; Stress  
  Abstract Poor sleep in elderly populations is associated with detrimental neuropsychological, and physiological changes including premature immunosenescence and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here, we evaluated the effects of acupuncture on sleep quality, psychological distress and immunosenescence in elderly, as well as effects on BDNF levels. Forty-eight community-dwelling elderly were randomized into true or placebo acupuncture, and intervention consisted of ten sessions. Sleep quality, depression and stress scores were evaluated by the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), beck depression inventory (BDI II) and perceived stress scale (PSS), respectively, before and after the intervention. Lymphocyte subsets commonly associated with stress, sleep impairment and immunosenescence were phenotyped by flow cytometry. BDNF plasma levels were assessed by ELISAs. Acupuncture was highly effective for improving sleep quality (-53.23%; p<0.01), depression (-48.41%; p<0.01), and stress (-25.46%; p<0.01). However, neither lymphocyte subpopulations nor BDNF levels changed following the intervention.  
  Address Laboratory of Immunosenescence, Institute of Biomedical Research, Pontifical Catholic University of the Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, Brazil; Electronic address: mebauer@pucrs.br  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 days Frequency >1/wk Number of Participants 48  
  Time in Treatment 5 weeks Condition Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25511549 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1991  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zukow, W.; Kalisz, Z.; Muszkieta, R.; Napierala, M. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 168-172  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To assess the clinical effects of acupuncture in treating rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Seventy patients fulfilled at least 4 items of the diagnostic criteria for rheumatoid arthritis of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). All patients were instructed not to receive other relevant therapties during research. Patients were randomized into a treatment group and a control group by computer generated assigned codes to receive real acupucture and sham acupucntre respectively. The codes of randomization were hidden from doctors and patients. Patients were studied before and after the whole acupuncture treatment sessions (36 treatments). The results were assessed according to changes of ESR mm/h, CRP mg/L, rehumatoid factor (RF), the radiological changes (the erosion and osteoporosis of hand or wrist joint), the intensity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS), the modified questionnaire according to Laitinen and Zykowski (the intensity of pain, frequency of pain, medicines, limitaiton of motive activity). Results: No significant differences in comparison of any parameters were shown before treatment. After treatment, the results of VAS and modified questionnaire were far better in the treatment group than in the control. Conclusion: Acupuncture can achieve a positive result compared with the sham, and it is effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis.  
  Address 1. University of Economy, Bydgoszcz, Poland 2. Bydgoszcz University, Bydgoszcz, Poland 3. Kazimierz Wielki Univeristy, Bydgoszcz, Poland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/2/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; 1. University of Economy, Bydgoszcz, Poland 2. Bydgoszcz University, Bydgoszcz, Poland 3. Kazimierz Wielki Univeristy, Bydgoszcz, Poland Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1725  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zou, R.; Zhang, H. X.; Zhang, T. F. url  openurl
  Title Comparative study on treatment of acute gouty arthritis by electroacupuncture with different frequency Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages 212-214  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Gout; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style;  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To study the therapeutic effect of treatment of acute gouty arthritis (AGA) respectively by electroacupuncture (EA) with different frequency and oral intake of Western medicine. METHODS: Seventy-two patients of AGA were randomly assigned into three groups, 24 in each group. Group A was treated with EA 100 Hz; Group B with EA 2 Hz; and Group C with Western medicine. The analgesic effect, initiating time and sustaining time of analgesia were observed and the level of serum uric acid was measured before and after treatment. RESULTS: The initiating time of analgesia was shorter while the sustaining time of analgesia was longer in Group A and B than those in Group C (all P < 0.01). The efficacy of analgesia was higher in Group B than that in Group A, and a better effect was shown in Group B in reducing serum uric acid level than that in Group A (P < 0.01), which was near that in Group C (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: EA is an effective treatment for AGA, and low frequency (2 Hz) EA showed a better efficacy  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Wuhan Municipal Hospital of Integrative Medicine, Wuhan, China. zrr520xyxy@yahoo.com.cn  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Gout
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1498  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zollman, F. S.; Larson, E. B.; Wasek-Throm, L. K.; Cyborski, C. M.; Bode, R. K. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Treatment of Insomnia in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Intervention Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal J Head Trauma Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Nervous System Diseases; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Insomnia; Brain Injuries  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES:: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture in treating insomnia in traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors as compared to medication, to determine whether acupuncture has fewer cognitive and affective adverse effects than does medication. PARTICIPANTS:: Twenty-four adult TBI survivors, randomized to acupuncture or control arms. SETTING:: Outpatient rehabilitation clinic. MEASURES:: Insomnia Severity Index (degree of insomnia); actigraphy (sleep time); Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (depression); Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (cognitive function) administered at baseline and postintervention. RESULTS:: Sleep time did not differ between the treatment and control groups after intervention, whereas cognition improved in the former but not the latter. CONCLUSION:: Acupuncture has a beneficial effect on perception of sleep or sleep quality and on cognition in our small sample of patients with TBI. Further studies of this treatment modality are warranted to validate these findings and to explore factors that contribute to treatment efficacy.  
  Address Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation &amp; Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Dr Zollman), Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Dr Larson)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 24  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1497  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zi Y. Chen; Ling Lin; Huan H. Wang; Yong Zhou; Jian Q. Yan; Yi L. Huang; Qu L. Guo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ondansetron combined with ST36 (Zusanli) acupuncture point injection for postoperative vomiting Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 124-131  
  Keywords Surgery, Laparoscopic; Postoperative Complications; Vomiting -- Prevention and Control; Ondansetron -- Administration and Dosage; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Analgesia -- Methods; Combined Modality Therapy; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Data Analysis Software; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; Kruskal-Wallis Test; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; China; Adult  
  Abstract Background Ondansetron, sometimes combined with acustimulation at PC6 (Neiguan), is commonly used for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting, but PC6 is not the only point that can be used for this purpose. Objectives To evaluate the combined effects of ondansetron and ST36 (Zusanli) acupuncture point injection on postoperative vomiting (POV) after laparoscopic surgery. Methods A randomised, patient and assessor-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted. One hundred and sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) group P (placebo-control): intravenous normal saline +bilateral non-acupuncture point injection of vitamin B1 (n=40); (2) group O (ondansetron): intravenous ondansetron+bilateral ST36 sham injection (n=40); (3) group A (acupuncture point injection): intravenous normal saline+bilateral acupuncture point injection at ST36 of vitamin B1 (n=40); (4) group C (combination): intravenous ondansetron+bilateral acupuncture point injection at ST36 of vitamin B1 (n=40). Interventions were made on arrival at the postanaesthesia care unit. The primary outcome was the incidence of POV within 24 h after the operation. Secondary outcomes included severity of vomiting, incidence of rescue treatment, patients' satisfaction and the first anal exsufflation time 24 h after the operation. Results The incidence of POV within 24 h postoperative period in each group was P 33%; O 11%, A 9% and C 6%. Outcomes for all intervention groups were significantly better than that for placebo (p<0.01). For the three interventions compared with placebo, the numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were O, NNT=5; A, NNT=5 and C, NNT=4. The secondary outcomes also demonstrated greater benefits of the combined regimen, with improvement seen in all the measures. Conclusions Ondansetron, acupuncture, and ondansetron and acupuncture combined are effective prophylaxis for POV.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, PR China  
  Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103927533. Language: English. Entry Date: 20140411. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9304117. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103927533 Serial 2390  
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Author (down) Zhuo, Z.; ang, N.; an, F. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observations on Combined Acupunture and Medication for Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages 370-376  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical effect of combined acupuncture and medication for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 100 cases with postmenopausal osteoporosis were randomly treated with electroacupuncture coupled with Calcitriol soft capsules, while the cases in the control group were treated with electroacupuncture alone. Results: There were significant differences in treatment effects between the treatmnet group and control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Combined acupuncture and medication can obtain a marked effect for postmenopausal osteoporosis.  
  Address No. 1 People's Hospital, Yuhang Distrcit, Hangzhou City, Zhejiang 311100, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Article to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; No. 1 People's Hospital, Yuhang Distrcit, Hangzhou City, Zhejiang 311100, P.R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1750  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhuang, X.; Wang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture treatment of Parkinson's disease--a report of 29 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 265-267  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Electroacupuncture; Moxibustion; Parkinson Disease; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Nervous System Diseases;  
  Abstract It can be concluded that acupuncture possesses definite therapeutic effectiveness for Parkinson's disease, which is mainly represented by improvement in the clinical symptoms and signs, delaying of the disease's progression, decrease in the dosage of anti-parkinsonian drug, and expectant treatment of the complications and symptoms induced by the drug side-effects  
  Address Second Clinical College, Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 45  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 53  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1496  
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Author (down) Zhuang, L.; Yang, Z.; Zeng, X.; Zhua, X.; Chen, Z.; Liu, L.; Meng, Z. url  openurl
  Title The Preventive and Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncture for Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Integrative cancer therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Neoplasms; Xerostomia; Acupuncture; Dry Mouth; Cancer  
  Abstract Background. METHODS: Some studies suggest that acupuncture may be beneficial. Objectives. The authors evaluated the preventive and therapeutic effect of acupuncture for radiation-induced xerostomia among patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CBM, CAJD, Wan Fang database, and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals were electronically searched, in conjunction with further manual search for relevant articles. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated. RESULTS: Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the therapeutic effect of acupuncture were included. One RCT on the preventive effect of acupuncture was found. Because of the considerable variation among included studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Two included RCTs used placebo controls, and both observed significant improvement in the salivary flow rates between acupuncture and control groups. However, no significant differences were found. Three included RCTs suggested that acupuncture for radiation-induced xerostomia can improve patients' subjective symptoms. The only study evaluating the preventive effect of acupuncture for radiation-induced xerostomia showed positive changes in salivary flow rates (both unstimulated and stimulated) and dry mouth -related symptoms. Acupuncture treatment was well tolerated by all patients and no severe adverse effects were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient evidence is available to judge whether acupuncture is safe and whether it is effective in preventing or treating radiation-induced xerostomia. Significant research remains to be done before acupuncture can be recommended for routine use in radiation-induced xerostomia.  
  Address Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Xerostomia
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1495  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhuang, L. X.Xu, S. F.D'Adamo, C. R.Jia, C.He, J.Han, D. X.Lao, L. X., url  openurl
  Title An Effectiveness Study Comparing Acupuncture, Physiotherapy, and Their Combination in Poststroke Rehabifitation: A Multicentered, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine Abbreviated Journal Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine  
  Volume 18 Issue 3 M3 - Article Pages 8-34  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stroke; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract Context Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, being the third leading cause of death in the United States and the second and third most common causes of death in Chinese cities and rural areas, respectively. Evaluation of different rehabilitative modalities appears necessary to optimize treatment. Objectives To compare acupuncture and physiotherapy for effectiveness and reliability in treating hemiplegic patients after stroke. Design The research team designed a multicentered, threearm, randomized controlled trial. Power calculations revealed a targeted sample size of 310 participants. Setting: The study took place at seven in-patient hospitals in China. Participants The research team screened a total of 310 patients. Of that number, 274 completed the study, 15 did not meet the inclusion/exclusion criteria, and 21 dropped out. Adverse events were rare (less than 1%), mild, and temporary. Intervention The research team randomly divided participants into three groups that all received conventional care as needed-including psychological counseling, standard nursing care, and daily medical evaluation plus (1) acupuncture, (2) physiotherapy, or (3) acupuncture plus physiotherapy. The participants received treatments once a day, 6 days a week for 4 weeks. Outcome Measures The research team evaluated all patients at baseline, after 2 weeks, and after 4 weeks using the FuglMeyer Assessment of Physical Performance (FMA), a modified Barthel Index (BI), and the Neurologic Defect Scale (NDS). Results No significant differences existed between the three groups at baseline. Compared to baseline, participants in all groups improved their FMA, BI, and NDS scores by the end of week 2 (P⩽05) and further improved by the end of week 4 (P⩽.05) The study found no statistically significant differences in outcomes between the three groups after treatment (P> .05). Conclusion Acupuncture plus conventional care was similar in effectiveness to physiotherapy treatment plus conventional care for poststroke rehabilitation. The study found no synergistic effects for the combination of acupuncture and physiotherapy in addition to conventional care; that combination of treatments was no more effective than either treatment by itself The effectiveness and lack of adverse events associated with acupuncture m this study suggest that it may represent an additional treatment option for stroke patients. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; Copyright of Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine is the property of PH Innovisions Journal Operating LLC and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address First Hospital, Guangzhou Traditional Chinese Medicine University, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 274  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhuang, L. url  openurl
  Title Twenty one cases of vertebral-artery-type cervical spondylosis treated with acupuncture and moxibustion Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 280-281  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Cervical Spondylosis; Moxa, Indirect; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Moxibustion; Neck Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Spinal Osteophytosis; TCM Acupuncture Style;  
  Abstract  
  Address First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of TCM and Pharmacy, Guangzhou 510405  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 27  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1493  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Deng, Z. openurl 
  Title Acupoint Injection Combined with Auricular Point Taping in Treating 158 Cases of Epigastric Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 27-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Abdominal Pain; Epigastric Pain; Rct; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture Point Injection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Ear Seeds; Auricular Acupressure; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Epigastric pain is a disease characterized by the main manifestation of recurrent intense abdominal pain. From 2008 to 2010, we undertook acupoint injection of atropine combined with auricular point taping to 158 of 288 patients with epigastric pain, and achieved good clinical curative effects. The reports are as follows.  
  Address Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants 288  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Disease OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Abdominal Pain; Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1766  
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Author (down) Zhu, Y.; Zhou, H.; Min, Y. openurl 
  Title Effect of Preoperative Acupuncture on Peri-operative Pain in Patients Following a Thoracotomy Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 79-83  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the effect of preoperative effect on peti-operative pain in patients following a thoracotomy. Methods: 120 cases following lung-cancer thoracotomy were randomly allocated into four groups, 30 in each group. Cases in group A and B were treated with acupuncture analgesia 3 d before operation; cases in group A and C were treated with acupuncture analgesia after operation; and cases in group D were treated with general anesthesia. The pain management indexes in four groups were all controlled below 3. After that, analgesia-related 13-endorphin and stress-related cortisol were observed before and after operation. In addition, the specific doses of postoperative analgesic-Fentanyl in four groups were compared. Results: The comparison of I3-endorphin between group A, C and D showed P<0.05 one day before operation, so did group B, C and D 1 day before operation. The infra-group comparison of cortisol between the day of admission and 1 day after extubation and between 1 day before operation and one day after extubation in group A, B and D showed P<0.05, so did group C between the day of admission and 1 day after extubation. In addition, the contents of Fentanyl in postoperative analgesic pump in four groups showed P<0.05 through one-factor analysis of variance, showing a significant difference. Conclusion: Preemptive analgesia could increase the I3-endorphin in patients following a thoracotomy and showed remarkable advantage when compared with the conventional postoperative analgesia. It did not cause significant difference regarding stress index cortisol. Acupuncture has no remarkable advantage when compared with operation and extubation for the major immediate stress. Additionally, postoperative acupuncture could be a substitute for the dose of pain killers and the match can be reduced by 20%.  
  Address Acupuncture Anethesia Research Room, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Article to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 2/12/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Acupuncture Anethesia Research Room, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Shanghai 200433, P.R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1754  
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Author (down) Zhu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Ouyang, G.; Meng, D.; Qian, K.; Wang, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Subacute Stroke: No Benefits Detected Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Physical therapy Abbreviated Journal Phys Ther  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Stroke; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Physical; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is debate around the effect of acupuncture on stroke with key reviews unable to find evidence of effect. This may be due to poor study design, small sample size and insufficient theoretical background. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to determine if acupuncture combined with conventional physical therapy improves motor function and activities of daily living in subacute stroke patients compared to conventional physical therapy alone. DESIGN: Multicenter, single-blinded, randomized study. SETTING: Four rehabilitation centers in the Jiangsu province of China participated in this study. PATIENTS: One hundred and eighty-eight patients with subacute stroke admitted to the hospital were randomized into an acupuncture group and a conventional rehabilitation group. INTERVENTIONS: A combination of body and scalp acupuncture was used for three months in the acupuncture group. All patients underwent conventional stroke rehabilitation. MEASUREMENTS: The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Barthel Index (BI) were performed at baseline, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after inclusion in the study. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were found at baseline between the groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups using the FMA motor scores and the BI scores at baseline, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Significant improvements were found in each group following treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with subacute stroke, the addition of body and scalp acupuncture to a regimen of conventional physical therapy does not result in further improvement in either motor function or activities of daily living beyond the effect of conventional physical therapy alone.  
  Address Y. Zhu, Department of Rehabilitation, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 65  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 188  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1492  
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Author (down) Zhu, X.; Proctor, M.; Bensoussan, A.; Wu, E.; Smith, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology  
  Abstract Background: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine may be a suitable alternative. Objectives: To determine the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment. Search methods: The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (to 2006), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2007), EMBASE (1980 to January 2007), CINAHL (1982 to January 2007), AMED (1985 to January 2007), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library issue 4, 2006), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1990 to January 2007), Traditional Chinese Medicine Database System (TCMDS, 1990 to December 2006), and the Chinese BioMedicine Database (CBM, 1990 to December 2006) were searched. Citation lists of included trials were also reviewed. Selection criteria: Any randomised controlled trials involving Chinese herbal medicine versus placebo, no treatment, conventional therapy, heat compression, another type of Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture or massage. Exclusion criteria were identifiable pelvic pathology and dysmenorrhoea resulting from the use of an intra-uterine contraceptive device. Data collection and analysis: Quality assessment, data extraction and data translation were performed independently by two review authors. Attempts were made to contact study authors for additional information and data. Data were combined for meta-analysis using either Peto odds ratios or relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data or weighted mean difference for continuous data. A fixed-effect statistical model was used, where suitable. If data were not suitable for meta-analysis, any available data from the trial were extracted and presented as descriptive data. Main results: Thirty-nine randomised controlled trials involving a total of 3475 women were included in the review. A number of the trials were of small sample size and poor methodological quality. Results for Chinese herbal medicine compared to placebo were unclear as data could not be combined (3 RCTs). Chinese herbal medicine resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.52 to 2.60), overall symptoms (6 RCTs; RR 2.17, 95% CI 1.73 to 2.73) and use of additional medication (2 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.93) when compared to use of pharmaceutical drugs. Self-designed Chinese herbal formulae resulted in significant improvements in pain relief (18 RCTs; RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.36), overall symptoms (14 RCTs; RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.40) and use of additional medication (5 RCTs; RR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34 to 1.87) after up to three months of follow-up when compared to commonly used Chinese herbal health products. Chinese herbal medicine also resulted in better pain relief than acupuncture (2 RCTs; RR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82) and heat compression (1 RCT; RR 2.08, 95% CI 2.06 to 499.18). Authors' conclusions: The review found promising evidence supporting the use of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea; however, results are limited by the poor methodological quality of the included trials.  
  Address Xiaoshu Zhu, Center for Complementary Medicine Research, School of Biomedical and Health Science, University of Western Sydney, Building 24, Campbelltown Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, Sydney, New South Wales, 1797, Australia  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Menstr Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2101  
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Author (down) Zhu, X.; Liew, Y.; Liu, Z.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Women's Health; Herb, Single; Herbal Formula  
  Abstract Background: Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) usage is expected to increase as women suffering from menopausal symptoms are seeking alternative therapy due to concerns from the adverse effects (AEs) associated with hormone therapy (HT). Scientific evidence for their effectiveness and safety is needed. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CHM in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Search methods: We searched the Gynaecology and Fertility Group's Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO (from inception to March 2015). Others included Current Control Trials, Citation Indexes, conference abstracts in the ISI Web of Knowledge, LILACS database, PubMed, OpenSIGLE database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI, 1999 to 2015). Other resources included reference lists of articles as well as direct contact with authors. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of CHM with placebo, HT, pharmaceutical drugs, acupuncture, or another CHM formula in women over 18 years of age, and suffering from menopausal symptoms. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed 864 studies for eligibility. Data extractions were performed by them with disagreements resolved through group discussion and clarification of data or direct contact with the study authors. Data analyses were performed in accordance with Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Main results: We included 22 RCTs (2902 women). Participants were from different ethnic backgrounds with the majority of Chinese origin. When CHM was compared with placebo (eight RCTs), there was little or no evidence of a difference between the groups for the following pooled outcomes: hot flushes per day (MD 0.00, 95% CI -0.88 to 0.89; 2 trials, 199 women; moderate quality evidence); hot flushes per day assessed by an overall hot flush score in which a difference of one point equates to one mild hot flush per day (MD -0.81 points, 95% CI -2.08 to 0.45; 3 RCTs, 263 women; low quality evidence); and overall vasomotor symptoms per month measured by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (MENQOL, scale 0 to 6) (MD -0.42 points; 95% CI -1.52 to 0.68; 3 RCTs, 256 women; low quality evidence). In addition, results from individual studies suggested there was no evidence of a difference between the groups for daily hot flushes assessed by severity (MD -0.70 points, 95% CI -1.00, -0.40; 1 RCT, 108 women; moderate quality evidence); or overall monthly hot flushes scores (MD -2.80 points, 95% CI -8.93 to 3.33; 1 RCT, 84 women; very low quality evidence); or overall daily night sweats scores (MD 0.07 points, 95% CI -0.19 to 0.33, 1 RCT, 64 women; low quality evidence); or overall monthly night sweats scores (MD 1.30 points, 95% CI -1.76 to 4.36, 1 RCT, 84 women; very low quality evidence). However one study using the Kupperman Index reported that overall monthly vasomotor symptom scores were lower in the CHM group (MD -4.79 points, 95% CI -5.52 to -4.06; 1 RCT, 69 women; low quality evidence). When CHM was compared with hormone therapy (HT) (10 RCTs), only two RCTs reported monthly vasomotor symptoms using MENQOL. It was uncertain whether CHM reduces vasomotor symptoms (MD 0.47 points, 95% CI -0.50 to 1.44; 2 RCTs, 127 women; very low quality evidence). Adverse effects were not fully reported in the included studies. Adverse events reported by women taking CHM included mild diarrhoea, breast tenderness, gastric discomfort and an unpleasant taste. Effects were inconclusive because of imprecise estimates of effects: CHM versus placebo (RR 1.51; 95% CI 0.69 to 3.33; 7 trials, 705 women; I² = 40%); CHM versus HT (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.39; 2 RCTs, 864 women; I² = 0%); and CHM versus specific conventional medications (such as Fluoxetine and Estazolam) (RR 0.20; 95% CI 0.03 to 1.17; 2 RCTs, 139 women; I² = 61%). Authors' conclusions: We found insufficient evidence that Chinese herbal medicines were any more or less effective than placebo or HT for the relief of vasomotor symptoms. Effects on safety were inconclusive. The quality of the evidence ranged from very low to moderate; there is a need for well-designed randomised controlled studies.  
  Address Xiaoshu Zhu, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, Sydney, New South Wales, 2751, Australia  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2091  
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Author (down) Zhu, X.; Hamilton, K. D.; McNicol, E. D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for pain in endometriosis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 9 Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Endometriosis; Genital Diseases, Female; Acupuncture; Women's Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a prevalent gynaecological condition, significantly affecting women's lives. Clinical presentations may vary from absence of symptoms to complaints of chronic pelvic pain, most notably dysmenorrhoea. The management of pain in endometriosis is currently inadequate. Acupuncture has been studied in gynaecological disorders but its effectiveness for pain in endometriosis is uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for pain in endometriosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MSDG) Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, CNKI and TCMDS (from inception to 2010) and reference lists of retrieved articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised single or double-blind controlled trials enrolling women of reproductive age with a laparoscopically confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis and comparing acupuncture (body, scalp or auricular) to either placebo or sham, no treatment, conventional therapies or Chinese herbal medicine. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data; we contacted study authors for additional information. Meta-analyses were not performed as only one study was included. The primary outcome measure was decrease in pain from endometriosis. Secondary outcome measures included improvement in quality of life scores, pregnancy rate, adverse effects and rate of endometriosis recurrence. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-four studies were identified that involved acupuncture for endometriosis; however only one trial, enrolling 67 participants, met all the inclusion criteria. The single included trial defined pain scores and cure rates according to the Guideline for Clinical Research on New Chinese Medicine. Dysmenorrhoea scores were lower in the acupuncture group (mean difference -4.81 points, 95% confidence interval -6.25 to -3.37, P &lt; 0.00001) using the 15-point Guideline for Clinical Research on New Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Pelvic Endometriosis scale. The total effective rate ('cured', 'significantly effective' or 'effective') for auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine was 91.9% and 60%, respectively (risk ratio 3.04, 95% confidence interval 1.65 to 5.62, P = 0.0004). The improvement rate did not differ significantly between auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for cases of mild to moderate dysmenorrhoea, whereas auricular acupuncture did significantly reduce pain in cases of severe dysmenorrhoea. Data were not available for secondary outcomes measures. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for pain in endometriosis is limited, based on the results of only a single study that was included in this review. This review highlights the necessity for developing future studies that are well-designed, double-blinded, randomised controlled trials that assess various types of acupuncture in comparison to conventional therapies.  
  Address Center for Complementary Medicine Research, School of Biomedical and Health Science, University of Western Sydney, Building 24, Campbelltown Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1797.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1491  
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Author (down) Zhu, X.; Bi, A.; Han, X. url  openurl
  Title Treatment of retinal vein obstruction with acupuncture and Chinese medicinal herbs Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 211-213  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Herbal Formula; RCT; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Eye Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Bloodletting  
  Abstract We have treated thirty-two cases (52 eyes) of retinal vein obstruction by acupuncture and oral administration of Huo Xue Ming Mu Decoction. The total effective rate of 90.38% demonstrated that the treatment was definitely effective  
  Address Zibo Municipal TCM Hospital, Zibo 255300, Shandong Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Retinal Vein Occlusion
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1490  
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Author (down) Zhu, X. M.; Polus, B. url  openurl
  Title A controlled trial on acupuncture for chronic neck pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 13-28  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Electroacupuncture; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Sham TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract To evaluate the efficacy of Chinese medicine (CM) acupuncture for chronic neck pain (CNP), a single blind, controlled, crossover, clinical trial was undertaken. Twenty-nine volunteers with CNP were randomly recruited into two groups. Both groups received two phases of treatment with a washout period between the two phases. Group A (14 volunteers) received CM acupuncture in the first phase and sham acupuncture in the second, while Group B (15 volunteers) received sham in the first and real in the second. CM acupuncture was individualized and consisted of nine sessions on both local and distal points. Manual twisting of the needle was applied on all points plus strong electrical stimulation of distal points in CM acupuncture. Sham acupoints (lateral to the real) and sham (weak) electrical stimulation was used in the control group. Comparison of subjective and objective measures between the two groups was made at different periods, including baseline, after each phase of treatment, after washout, and after the 16th week follow-up. The subjective measures included pain intensity, duration per day, analgesic medication count, visual analogue scales (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). The objective measures consisted of neck range of motion (ROM) and pain threshold (PT). Both the real and sham treatments significantly reduced subjective pain, without significant differences between groups for most subjective measures. Objective measures showed no significant change for either group before and after each period or by inter-groups analysis. A minimum 16-week effect of both real and sham acupuncture was found for subjective measures in the follow-up periods. Further study is recommended with an increased sample size, a longer washout period, and a longer baseline period  
  Address Betta Health Medical Center, Chinese Medicine Unite, Chadstone, Vic, Australia. annzhu29@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1489  
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Author (down) Zhu, W.; Wu, Y.; Fan, Y. openurl 
  Title Clinical Obsrvation on Tuina plus Warming Needling Moxibustion for Lumbar Disc Herniation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 227-230  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Intervertebral Disc Displacement; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Moxibustion; Moxa, Indirect; Warming Needle; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Tuina; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the therapeutic efficacy of tuina plus warming needling moxibustion for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Methods: A total of 90 LDH cases were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 45 in each group. Cases in the observation group received tuina and warm needling moxibustion, whereas cases in the control group received tuina manipulation alone. Results: The total effective rate in the observation group was 88.9% versus 75.6% in the control group, showing a statitical significance (P<0.01). Conclusion: Tuina in combination with warm needling moxibustion works better than tuina manipulation alone for LDH.  
  Address No. 6 People's Hospital Affiliated cto Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Intervertebral Disc Displacement
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1488  
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Author (down) Zhu, T. M.; Li, H.; Jin, R. J.; Zheng, Z.; Luo, Y.; Ye, H.; Zhu, H. M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of electroacupuncture combined psycho-intervention on cognitive function and event-related potentials P300 and mismatch negativity in patients with internet addiction Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Chinese journal of integrative medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 146-151  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Miscellaneous; Internet Addiction; Drug Addiction; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Usual Care Control, Educational  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of comprehensive therapy (CT) with electroacupuncture (EA) in combination with psycho-intervention (PI) on the cognitive function and event-related potentials (ERP), P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN), in patients with internet addiction (IA) for a preliminary exploration of the possible mechanism of the therapy. METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients with IA were randomly divided into three groups, and a total of 112 subjects reached the final analysis of the trial, the EA group (39 patients), the PI group (36 patients) and the CT group (37 patients). EA was applied at acupoints Baihui (GV20), Sishencong (EX-HN1), Hegu (LI4), Neiguan (PC6), Taichong (LR3) and Sanyinjiao (SP6), once every other day; PI with the cognitionbehavior mode was implemented every 4 days; both EA and PI were used in the CT group. The treatment course for all patients was 40 days. Changes before and after treatment in terms of scoring by the IA self-rating scale, short-term memory capacity, short-term memory span, and the latency and amplitude of P300 and MMN in patients were observed. RESULTS: After treatment, in all groups, the IA score was lowered significantly (P <0.05) and scores of short-term memory capacity and short-term memory span increased significantly (P <0.05), while the decreased IA score in the CT group was more significant than that in the other two groups (P <0.05). ERP measurements showed that P300 latency was depressed and its amplitude raised in the EA group; MMN amplitude increased in the CT group (all P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The EA in combination with PI could improve the cognitive function of IA patients, and its mechanism might be related to the speedup of cerebral discrimination on external stimulus and the enhancement of effective resource mobilization during information processing of the brain.  
  Address College of Acupuncture and Massage, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, 610075, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Internet Addiction
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1487  
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