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Author (up) Bai, Z.-H.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Li, C.-R.; Wang, M.; Kim, M.-J.; Guo, H.; Wang, C.-Y.; Xiao, T.-W.; Chi, Y.; Ren, L.; Gu, Z.-Y.; Xu, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Eye Acupuncture Treatment for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 871327  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture; Eye Acupuncture Therapy; TCM  
  Abstract There were applications of eye acupuncture for stroke patients. Unfortunately, similar to many other Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) treatments, it lacks comprehensive evaluation and system review for its effect and safety. Objective. This study is a systematic review to appraise the safety and effectiveness of eye acupuncture for stroke. Methods. “Eye acupuncture therapy” in eleven databases was searched by randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. The search activity was ended in April 2014. The data were extracted and assessed by three independent authors. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. Results. Sixteen trials (1120 patients) were involved with generally poor methodological quality. The study indicated that when eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine compared to western medicine, there was a significant difference in the areas of mental state, swallow function, and NDS. When eye acupuncture was combined with western medicine and rehabilitation compared to western medicine and rehabilitation, there was significant difference in the changes of SSS, FMA, and constipation symptoms evaluation. No adverse events or side effects have been reported. Conclusions. The current evidence is insufficient and the rigorously designed trials are warranted.  
  Address Benxi City Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Benxi 117022, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Stroke Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26161127; PMCID:PMC4486759 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1955  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baker, T.E.; Chang, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use of auricular acupuncture in opioid use disorder: A systematic literature review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The American Journal on Addictions Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 25 Issue 8 Pages 592-602  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic disease with significant personal, societal, and public health consequences. Even for the minority who receive the most effective evidence-based treatments, morbidity, and mortality remain significant. These facts, along with the recovery movement calling for individualized, holistic, culturally sensitive care, have led to the exploration of adjunctive interventions including acupuncture. Despite hundreds of international trials, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding its efficacy in OUD due in large part to methodological issues of trials to date. In response to these issues, the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) developed an operationalized manual auricular acupuncture protocol that has since become the most widely used in the US. This systematic review is the first to focus explicitly on randomized trials utilizing the NADA protocol as a complementary intervention to address OUD. METHODS: The methods utilized to identify studies for inclusion are based on a 2009 protocol developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. RESULTS: Four trials met inclusion criteria. Despite methodological issues, results indicate that while the NADA protocol may not be effective in reducing acute opiate craving or withdrawal, it may be effectively utilized as an adjunctive treatment to increase treatment retention and decrease methadone detoxification and maintenance dosages in OUD. CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Incorporation of the NADA protocol into existing evidence-based treatment approaches may facilitate recovery and, through its impact on treatment retention and completion, indirectly impact morbidity, and mortality in individuals with OUD. Given the limitations of the current review, conclusions are tentative and directions for future research are discussed. (Am J Addict 2016;25:592-602).  
  Address Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28051842 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2178  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Balk, J.; Day, R.; Rosenzweig, M.; Beriwal, S. url  openurl
  Title Pilot, randomized, modified, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Soc.Integr.Oncol.  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4-11  
  Keywords Cancer-Related Fatigue; Neoplasms; Fatigue; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Cancer;  
  Abstract Cancer-related fatigue is a substantial problem for cancer patients and their caregivers, but no effective treatment exists. Acupuncture has been suggested to improve cancer-related fatigue, but no randomized clinical trials have been conducted. We hypothesized that true acupuncture, compared with sham acupuncture, would reduce cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients receiving external radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to determine effect size and feasibility. A modified, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. The subject, clinical staff, and assessor were blinded, but the acupuncturist was not. Subjects received acupuncture once to twice per week during the 6-week course of radiation therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks, which was 4 weeks after that last radiation session. Twenty-seven subjects enrolled, and 23 completed the last data collection. Both true and sham acupuncture groups had improved fatigue, fatigue distress, quality of life, and depression from baseline to 10 weeks, but the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The true acupuncture group improved 5.50 (SE, +/- 1.48) points on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Subscale (FACIT-F), whereas the sham acupuncture group improved by 3.73 (SE +/- 1.92) points. This difference was not statistically significant (p = .37). All subjects guessed that they were in the true acupuncture group. Our study was underpowered to find a statistically significant difference. To demonstrate a statistically significant improvement between true and sham acupuncture would require 75 subjects per group in a future study. Owing to poor recruitment, the feasibility of a larger trial using the same methodology is low. Despite being underpowered, it appears that subjects receiving true acupuncture may benefit more than subjects receiving sham acupuncture. In the discussion section, we review our experience with using a sham-needle controlled study  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Fatigue
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 54  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ballegaard, S.; Christophersen, S. J.; Dawids, S. G.; Hesse, J.; Olsen, N. V. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. A randomized study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1985 Publication Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 20 Issue 10 Pages 1249-1254  
  Keywords TENS; Acu Versus Sham; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Pain; Pancreatitis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Sham Electroacupuncture; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation  
  Abstract In 23 patients with pancreatitis, daily pain for at least 3 months, and no abuse of alcohol, the pain-relieving effect of electroacupuncture (13 patients) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) (16 patients) was studied. In two prospective studies with a cross-over design, active acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture, and TENS of the segmental points of the pancreas with sham treatment. Neither electroacupuncture nor TENS brought about pain relief that could substitute for or supplement medical treatment  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 23  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Pancreatitis,Chronic
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 55  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ballegaard, S.; Jensen, G.; Pedersen, F.; Nissen, V. H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in severe, stable angina pectoris: a randomized trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Acta medica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Med Scand  
  Volume 220 Issue 4 Pages 307-313  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Angina Pectoris; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Cardiovascular Diseases  
  Abstract Twenty-six patients with stable angina pectoris, resistant to medical treatment, were randomized to either active or sham acupuncture in a single-blind design. Sham acupuncture was defined as the insertion of needles in a point within the same spinal segments as the active acupuncture, but outside the Chinese meridian system. The effect was evaluated from anginal attack rate, nitroglycerin consumption and exercise tests. Compared to patients receiving sham acupuncture the patients receiving active acupuncture increased cardiac work capacity significantly, expressed as dPRP (difference in pressure-rate-product between rest and maximum exercise) and maximal PRP during exercise (p less than 0.001). None of the other variables showed any significant difference between the two groups. Concerning exercise tolerance the median difference was 138 Wmin (95% confidence limits – 12.5 to 325 Wmin), concerning anginal attack rate the median difference was 29.5% (95% confidence limits 55% to -11%) and with regard to nitroglycerin consumption the median difference was 5% (95% confidence limits +67% to -44%). No significant effect of sham treatment was observed, no adverse effect was observed. We suggest that acupuncture may improve cardiac work capacity in patients with angina pectoris, refractory to medical treatment  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 26  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Angina Pectoris
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 56  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ballegaard, S.; Karpatschoff, B.; Holck, J. A.; Meyer, C. N.; Trojaborg, W. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in angina pectoris: do psycho-social and neurophysiological factors relate to the effect? Type of Study RCT
  Year 1995 Publication Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Electrother Res  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 101-116  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Angina Pectoris; Electroacupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Stress, Psychological; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Cardiovascular Diseases  
  Abstract We studied the effect of acupuncture in 49 patients with angina pectoris with focus on its relationship to psycho-social factors and changes in skin temperature, pain thresholds, and pain tolerance thresholds. No significant influence from patient expectation, social stress (strain) or profiles of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) was found (all p > 0.1). Acupuncture slightly increased exercise tolerance (median 7%), the difference in Systolic Blood Pressure-Heart Rate Product between rest and maximal exercise (delta PRP) (median 3%), and the time to onset of pain (median 10%); decreased nitroglycerin consumption (median 58%) and anginal attack rate (median 38%). Improvement in exercise tolerance was significantly correlated to an improvement in delta PRP (correlation coefficient = 0.7; p < 0.0001) but not to time of myocardial ischemia (correlation coefficient = 0.1; p = 0.1). Compared with 28 patients with a less pronounced anti-anginal effect, the 21 patients with a pronounced effect had a significant increase in local skin temperature, but had no significant change in distant skin temperature and pain thresholds. It is concluded that acupuncture, due to hemodynamic alterations, might have a specific effect on angina pectoris in addition to drug treatments  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 49  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Angina Pectoris
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 57  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, C. H.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, H. R.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, Y. F.; Shi, Y.; Weng, Z. J.; Feng, H.; Guan, X.; Li, J.; Chen, W. F.; Wu, L. Y.; Jin, X. M.; Dou, C. Z.; Wu, H. G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Randomized controlled trial: Moxibustion and acupuncture for the treatment of Crohn's disease Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication World journal of gastroenterology : WJG Abbreviated Journal World J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 20 Issue 31 Pages 11000-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Crohn Disease; RCT; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Moxibustion; Moxa; Warming Needle; Indirect Moxibustion; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of active Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Ninety-two patients were equally and randomly divided into the treatment group and received herb-partitioned moxibustion combined with acupuncture, and the control group received wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion combined with superficial acupuncture. The patients received three treatment sessions per week for 12 wk and were followed up for 24 wk. The main outcome was evaluated using the CD Activity Index (CDAI) score, and the secondary outcomes were evaluated using laboratory indicators such as hemoglobin (HGB), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, quality-of-life, endoscopic ratings, and intestinal histology scores. RESULTS: The CDAI scores of both the treatment and control groups were significantly reduced after treatment compared with those measured before treatment. However, the degree of improvement in the treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control group. The improvement in symptoms in patients of the treatment group was sustained at follow-up, whereas that of the control group was not. The overall efficacy of the treatment was significantly greater than that of the control. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in quality-of-life ratings after treatment, but the improvement was significantly greater in the treatment group than in the control group. In addition, the patients in the treatment group showed significantly increased HGB and significantly decreased CRP levels and histopathological scores at the end of treatment, whereas the control group did not exhibit significant changes. CONCLUSION: Moxibustion with acupuncture provided significant therapeutic benefits in patients with active CD beyond the placebo effect and is therefore an effective and safe treatment for active CD.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Immunological Effects, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200030, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 92  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Crohn Disease
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 58  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, T.; Cai, L.; Giles, J. T.; Gould, J.; Tarpinian, K.; Betts, K.; Medeiros, M.; Jeter, S.; Tait, N.; Chumsri, S.; Armstrong, D. K.; Tan, M.; Folkerd, E.; Dowsett, M.; Singh, H.; Tkaczuk, K.; Stearns, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A dual-center randomized controlled double blind trial assessing the effect of acupuncture in reducing musculoskeletal symptoms in breast cancer patients taking aromatase inhibitors Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Breast cancer research and treatment Abbreviated Journal Breast Cancer Res Treat  
  Volume 138 Issue 1 Pages 167-174  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Pain; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; Cancer  
  Abstract Up to 50 % of women receiving aromatase inhibitor (AI) complain of AI-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) and 15 % discontinue treatment. We conducted a randomized, sham-controlled trial to evaluate whether acupuncture improves AIMSS and to explore potential mechanisms. Postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer, experiencing AIMSS were randomized to eight weekly real or sham acupuncture sessions. We evaluated changes in the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and pain visual analog scale (VAS) following the intervention compared to baseline. Serum estradiol, beta-endorphin, and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured pre and post-intervention. We enrolled 51 women of whom 47 were evaluable, including 23 randomized to real and 24 to sham acupuncture. Baseline characteristics were balanced between groups with the exception of a higher HAQ-DI score in the real acupuncture group (p = 0.047). We did not observe a statistically significant difference in reduction of HAQ-DI (p = 0.30) or VAS (p = 0.31) between the two groups. Following eight weekly treatments, we observed a statistically significant reduction of IL-17 (p &lt;/= 0.009) in both groups. No significant modulation was seen in estradiol, beta-endorphin, or other proinflammatory cytokine concentrations in either group. We did not observe a significant difference in AIMSS changes between real and sham acupuncture. As sham acupuncture used in this study may not be equivalent to placebo, further studies with a non-acupuncture arm may be required to establish whether acupuncture is beneficial for the treatment of AIMSS.  
  Address University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD 20201, USA. tbao@umm.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 57  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 59  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, T.; Cai, L.; Snyder, C.; Betts, K.; Tarpinian, K.; Gould, J.; Jeter, S.; Medeiros, M.; Chumsri, S.; Bardia, A.; Tan, M.; Singh, H.; Tkaczuk, K. H.; Stearns, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Patient-reported outcomes in women with breast cancer enrolled in a dual-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial assessing the effect of acupuncture in reducing aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Cancer Abbreviated Journal Cancer  
  Volume 120 Issue 3 Pages 381-389  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Women's Health; RCT; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Sham; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been associated with decrements in patient-reported outcomes (PROs). The objective of this study was to assess whether real acupuncture (RA), compared with sham acupuncture (SA), improves PROs in patients with breast cancer who are receiving an adjuvant AI. METHODS: Postmenopausal women with a stage 0 through III breast cancer who received an AI and had treatment-associated musculoskeletal symptoms were randomized to receive 8 weekly RA versus SA in a dual-center, randomized controlled trial. The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) menopausal symptoms questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the hot flash daily diary, the Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDI), and the European quality-of-life survey (EuroQol) were used to assess PROs at baseline and at 4weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks. RESULTS: The intention-to-treat analysis included 23 patients in the RA arm and 24 patients in the SA arm. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Compared with baseline, scores in the RA arm improved significantly at week 8 on the CESD (P = .022), hot flash severity (P = .006), hot flash frequency (P = .011), the HFRDI (P = .014), and NSABP menopausal symptoms (P = .022); scores in the SA arm improved significantly on the EuroQol (P = .022),the HFRDI (P = .043), and NSABP menopausal symptoms (P = .005). Post-hoc analysis indicated that African American patients (n = 9) benefited more from RA than SA compared with non-African American patients (n = 38) in reducing hot flash severity (P < .001) and frequency (P < .001) scores. CONCLUSIONS: Both RA and SA were associated with improvement in PROs among patients with breast cancer who were receiving AIs, and no significant difference was detected between arms. Racial differences in response to acupuncture warrant further study. Cancer 2014;120:381-389. (c) 2013 American Cancer Society.  
  Address University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 47  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Breast Neoplasms
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 60  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, T.; Goloubeva, O.; Pelser, C.; Porter, N.; Primrose, J.; Hester, L.; Sadowska, M.; Lapidus, R.; Medeiros, M.; Lao, L.; Dorsey, S.G.; Badros, A.Z. doi  openurl
  Title A pilot study of acupuncture in treating bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Integr Cancer Ther Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 13 Issue 5 Pages 396-404  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Peripheral Neuropathy; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Observational Study; Cancer  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Peripheral neuropathy is the dose limiting toxicity of bortezomib in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture in reducing bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (BIPN) symptoms. METHODS: Patients with MM experiencing persistent BIPN >/=grade 2 despite adequate medical intervention and discontinuation of bortezomib received 10 acupuncture treatments for 10 weeks (2x/week for 2 weeks, 1x/week for 4 weeks, and then biweekly for 4 weeks). Responses were assessed by the Clinical Total Neuropathy Score (TNSc), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group-Neurotoxicity (FACT/GOG-Ntx) questionnaire, and the Neuropathy Pain Scale (NPS). Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test for monotonic decline in scores on each of the measures. Serial serum levels of proinflammatory and neurotrophic cytokines were obtained at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 14. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients with MM were enrolled in the trial. There were no adverse events associated with the acupuncture treatments. TNSc data were deemed invalid and therefore were not reported. At weeks 10 and 14, FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS showed significant reduction suggesting decreased pain, and improved function (P values were <.0001 for both FACT/GOG-Ntx and NPS at weeks 10 and 14). However, nerve conduction studies did not significantly change between baseline assessment and end of study. There was no correlation in serum cytokines for responders versus none responders. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is safe, feasible and produces subjective improvements in patients' symptoms. A follow-up randomized controlled trial is warranted.  
  Address The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.  
  Publisher (c) The Author(s) 2014.
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/26/2015; Date Modified: 3/10/2015; Priority: Normal; Chemotherapy Side Effects; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA baot@mskcc.org.; The University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24867959 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1745  
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Author (up) Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W. M.; Zhu, G. X.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C. T.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title Clinical Study of Scalp Acupuncture with Extended Needle Retention at Scalp-Acupoints for Treatment of Vascular Dementia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication American Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 35-37  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 61  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W.; zhu, G.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title A Randomized and Comparative Study on Vascular Dementia Treated by Needling Remaining at Head Points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 12-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 62  
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Author (up) Bardy, J.; Mackereth, P.; Finnegan-John, J.; Molassiotis, A. url  openurl
  Title Training in self-needling and performing it as part of a clinical trial: the practitioner and patient experience Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 33 Issue 3 Pages 210-216  
  Keywords CANCER -- Complications -- Treatment; FATIGUE -- Treatment; Acupuncture; ATTITUDE (Psychology); BREAST tumors; CONTENT analysis (Communication); FOCUS groups; Interviewing; RESEARCH -- Methodology; MEDICAL cooperation; MEDICAL personnel; Research; RESEARCH -- Finance; HEALTH self-care; QUALITATIVE research; TEACHING methods; THEMATIC analysis; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PATIENTS -- Attitudes; England  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the immediate effects of traditional local thermal therapy with indirect moxibustion on renal hemodynamics in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) by using Doppler ultrasonography (US). Design: Examiner-blinded crossover study. Participants: Forty-three participants with CKD (mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 44 ± 15 years; estimated glomerular filtration rate, 69.5 ± 25.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2; 20 men and 23 women). Intervention: Participants received three successive treatment sessions of indirect moxibustion bilaterally at BL 23, a crucial acupuncture point, in the session. In the control session, the examiner was blinded by using smoke and aroma produced by moxibustion performed in an ashtray placed near the patient's body. Outcome measures: The main outcome measure was resistive index (RI) in the renal segmental arteries. Blood flow parameters, including RI, were measured for six renal segmental arteries by using Doppler US at rest (baseline), immediately after completion of moxibustion (post 1), and 10 minutes later (post 2). Adverse events were monitored during intervention. Results: In the control session, RI at post 1 (median [first, third quartile]: 0.587 [0.562, 0.626]) and post 2 (0.583 [0.567, 0.629]) did not change significantly compared with baseline (0.592 [0.563, 0.636]), while in the treatment session, RI at post 1 (0.565 [0.530, 0.618]) and post 2 (0.561 [0.533, 0.614]) decreased significantly compared with baseline (0.590 [0.550, 0.652]) ( p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The reduction in RI from baseline to post 2 in treatment session was significantly greater than in control session (mean ± SD, ?0.026 ± 0.028 versus ?0.003 ± 0.028; mean difference, ?0.023 [95% confidence interval, ?0.036 to ?0.010]; p = 0.001]. No adverse events, such as burns, were observed during the study period. Conclusion: Renal vascular resistance was decreased after indirect moxibustion therapy in patients with CKD.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103624320; Source Information: Jun2015, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p210; Subject Term: CANCER -- Complications -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATIGUE -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: ATTITUDE (Psychology); Subject Term: BREAST tumors; Subject Term: CONTENT analysis (Communication); Subject Term: FOCUS groups; Subject Term: INTERVIEWING; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Methodology; Subject Term: MEDICAL cooperation; Subject Term: MEDICAL personnel; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: QUALITATIVE research; Subject Term: TEACHING methods; Subject Term: THEMATIC analysis; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PATIENTS -- Attitudes; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: ENGLAND; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2300  
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Author (up) Barlas, P.; Robinson, J.; Allen, J.; Baxter, G.D. openurl 
  Title Lack of effect of acupuncture upon signs and symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Clin Physiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 449-456  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Rct; Healthy Subjects; Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Ashi Acupuncture Style; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Doms  
  Abstract The effect of acupuncture upon experimentally induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was assessed in a placebo-controlled study under blinded conditions. Volunteers (n = 48; 24 M & 24 F) were randomly allocated to one of four groups: control (20 min rest), placebo (minimal needling at non-acupuncture points), treatment group 1 (acupuncture at classic acupuncture points) and treatment group 2 (acupuncture at 'tender' points). DOMS was induced in the elbow flexors of the non-dominant arm using a standardized eccentric exercise regime. Measurements of elbow range of movement (flexion, extension, relaxed angle), and pain as well as visual analogue scores (VAS), tenderness (using a pressure algometer) were employed as indices of treatment efficacy. Measurements of elbow range of movement and tenderness were made prior to DOMS induction on the first day, and repeated pre- and post-treatment on subsequent days; pain was assessed using visual analogue scales post-induction and post-treatment on the first day, and pre- and post-treatment thereafter. For all conditions, subjects rested supine for a period of 20 min, during which treatment was delivered according to group allocation. Repeated measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant interactive (AB) effects, except for visual analogue scores (P = 0.0483); one factor ANOVA on the second day of the experiment (pre-treatment) indicated significant differences between the control and all other groups. However, such differences were not found on any other day of the experiment. It is concluded that acupuncture has little effect upon the cardinal signs and symptoms of DOMS, at least under the conditions of the current experiment.  
  Address Physiotherapy Subject Group, School of Health and Social Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 48  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Healthy Subjects
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 2/24/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Healthy Subjects; Physiotherapy Subject Group, School of Health and Social Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=11100392 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Barlas, P.; Ting, S.L.; Chesterton, L.S.; Jones, P.W.; Sim, J. openurl 
  Title Effects of intensity of electroacupuncture upon experimental pain in healthy human volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 122 Issue 1-2 Pages 81-89  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Rct; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture is commonly used for pain relief. Despite an extensive evidence-base guiding the selection of stimulation parameters, little methodologically robust research exists regarding the level of intensity required to provide effective doses. This study investigated the hypoalgesic effects of two stimulation intensities compared to placebo on pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in pain-free humans. Forty-eight acupuncture-naive volunteers (mean age 23), stratified by gender, were screened for relevant contraindications and randomly allocated to four groups: control, placebo, high-intensity (“to tolerance but sub-noxious”) or low-intensity (“strong but comfortable”). True or placebo electroacupuncture, using the Streitberger placebo needle, was administered to acupoints on dominant forearm (LI10, TH5) and ipsilateral leg (GB34, ST38). True needles (30 mm long, 0.3 mm diameter) were inserted 20-25 mm and “de-qi” was elicited from active groups, prior to administering 30 min of 4 Hz, 200 micros electroacupuncture. No electrical stimulation was performed on control and placebo groups, and placebo needles were used. After the intervention period, all needles were removed. Volunteers were monitored for 30 further minutes. Two PPT measurements were taken bilaterally from muscle bellies of first dorsal interosseous by an independent rater, at baseline and at six subsequent 10-min intervals. Square-root transformed data were analysed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with baseline data as covariate. The high-intensity group was significantly different from the placebo group for both measurement sites (p=.020, p=.033). The control group displayed stable PPT readings over time. No significant differences were observed between the placebo and control groups. These findings suggest that high-intensity levels may be important in optimal dose selection.  
  Address School of Health and Rehabilitation, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 48  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 8/6/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; School of Health and Rehabilitation, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16527396 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1685  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Beal, M. W.; Nield-Anderson, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for symptom relief in HIV-positive adults: lessons learned from a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages 33-42  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; HIV Infections; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; HIV Infections  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Although acupuncture is used by many people with HIV disease as a complementary treatment to Western medicine, there is a lack of scientifically sound research on patient responses and outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting a larger study investigating the efficacy of acupuncture on symptom distress, psychological distress, and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals. DESIGN: This pilot study used a block randomization, single-blinded design. SETTING: Yale University General Clinical Research Center. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven HIV-positive participants. INTERVENTION: Patients were grouped by CD4 cell counts and received acupuncture treatments twice each week for 3 weeks. The experimental group received a protocol with 2 components: one tailored to the individual's symptoms and a second standardized component treatment designed to promote health and immune function. The control-needling group received a standardized acupuncture involving stimulation of acupuncture points identified as “clinically irrelevant” in treating the conditions under investigation (i.e., acupuncture points that have consistently not been cited as helpful for symptoms of relevant conditions or immune disorders). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The HIV-Symptom List was administered to gather data on symptom distress, the Brief Symptom Inventory was used to gather data on psychological distress, and the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection was administered to collect data on quality of life. RESULTS: Preliminary data from small numbers of participants showed trends toward improvement in symptoms and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: A follow-up pilot study will focus on the use of acupuncture to relieve gastrointestinal symptoms in people with HIV  
  Address Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Conn., USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition HIV Infections
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 63  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bearn, J.; Swami, A.; Stewart, D.; Atnas, C.; Giotto, L.; Gossop, M. url  openurl
  Title Auricular acupuncture as an adjunct to opiate detoxification treatment: Effects on withdrawal symptoms Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of substance abuse treatment Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Heroin Dependence; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupressure; Sham Control; Sham Acupoint Control; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Substance-Related Disorders; Opioid-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract It was hypothesized that auricular acupuncture would lead to reduced severity of opiate withdrawal symptoms and craving when provided as an adjunct to methadone detoxification. The study used a randomized, placebo-controlled study design. The sample consisted of 83 drug misusers who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for opiate dependence. Daily measures of withdrawal severity and craving were taken using the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale and an eight-item craving questionnaire. Urine screening was used as an objective assessment of treatment adherence. The study hypothesis was not confirmed. Auricular acupuncture had no effect upon withdrawal severity or craving when provided as an adjunct to a standard methadone detoxification treatment. The results are consistent with the findings of other studies that failed to find any effect of acupuncture in the treatment of drug dependence. The failure to find any clinical gains from the adjunctive use of auricular acupuncture during detoxification from opiates raises concerns about the widespread acceptance of this intervention  
  Address Wickham Park House (Drug Dependence Unit), Bethlem Royal Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, UK; National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 4AF, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 93  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Opioid-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 64  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Beith, J.; Oh, B.; Chatfield, M.; Davis, E.; Venkateswaran, R openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Nausea, Vomiting, and Myelosuppression in Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Medical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct  
  Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 241-248  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Chemotherapy Side Effects; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control; Cancer  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been demonstrated as an effective way to control nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy but has not been tested in conjunction with optimal use of antiemetic medication.

Objective: The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for women with breast cancer, who were receiving chemotherapy.

Design: The study was a randomized controlled pilot trial.

Setting: This trial was conducted at a medical oncology clinic at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Patients: Thirty-two women with breast cancer were recruited from a medical oncology clinic between March 2008 and July 2009.

Intervention: The intervention tested was true EA versus sham EA.

Main Outcome Measures: The study tested the effect of EA on women with breast cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, with respect to nausea, vomiting, and blood cell counts.

Results: All but 2 participants completed EA treatment; these two dropouts were 1 from the true EA group and 1 from the sham EA group. No adverse effects of EA were reported. There was no significant difference in nausea and vomiting between the groups. However, there were significant differences in adjusted white blood-cell and neutrophil counts at week 6 in the true EA group, compared to the sham EA group.

Conclusions: The findings of this trial suggest that EA during chemotherapy is a promising option for controlling side-effects of chemotherapy. An adequately powered, randomized, controlled trial to confirm the effect of EA is, therefore, warranted.
 
  Address Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Room 158, Transient Building (F12), Fisher Road, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 32  
  Time in Treatment 9 Weeks Condition Nausea
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 65  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Bennell, K.L.; Buchbinder, R.; Hinman, R.S. openurl 
  Title Physical therapies in the management of osteoarthritis: current state of the evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Curr Opin Rheumatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 304-311  
  Keywords  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review considers the role of physical therapies in osteoarthritis management, highlighting key findings from systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published in the last 2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: Three new trials question the role of manual therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis. No between-group differences in outcome were detected between a multimodal programme including manual therapy and home exercise, and placebo in one trial; a second trial found no benefit of adding manual therapy to an exercise programme, while a third trial reported marginal benefits over usual care that were of doubtful importance. Recent trials have also found no or uncertain clinical benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or acupuncture, or of valgus braces or lateral wedge insoles for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis. Available evidence suggests a small to moderate effect of exercise in comparison with not exercising for hip or knee osteoarthritis, although optimum exercise prescription and dosage are unclear. One trial also observed a delay in joint replacement in people with hip osteoarthritis. Two trials have reported conflicting findings about the effects of exercise for hand osteoarthritis. SUMMARY: Other than exercise, recent data suggest that the role of physical therapies in the treatment of osteoarthritis appears limited.  
  Address aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25775185 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1506  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Berle, C. A.; Cobbin, D.; Smith, N.; Zaslawski, C. url  openurl
  Title A novel approach to evaluate traditional Chinese medicine treatment outcomes using pattern identification Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 357-367  
  Keywords AcuTrials; TCM Acupuncture Style; RCT; Hepatitis C; Liver Diseases; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Methodological Concerns; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a modern interpretation of Chinese medicine, developed in the 1950s. It differentiates biomedical diseases into patterns. Each pattern comprises symptom/signs that have their own unique treatment protocol. Most TCM research has used fixed formula treatments for Western-defined diseases with outcomes often measured using objective biomedical markers. More recently, a number of trials have attempted to accommodate TCM clinical practice within the framework of rigorous evidence-based medical research. The aim of this article is to describe a novel outcome measure based on TCM patterns that was used in a pilot study for people with hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS: Sixteen (16) participants with HCV were enrolled in a randomized, controlled pilot study and allocated to a treatment or control group. TCM pattern diagnosis was obtained at baseline and used to guide acupuncture treatment for the treatment group. Each individual's primary, secondary, and tertiary TCM patterns were identified, which involved the systematic evaluation of the participant's information against the TCM patterns and conversion of the pattern to a percentage. Baseline and postintervention percentages for the three TCM patterns for the two groups were compared to assess change. RESULTS: There was a significant mean percentage decrease in pattern expression at week 12 compared to baseline for the secondary and tertiary patterns of the treatment group (56.3% versus 47.5%; p = 0.045 and 48.1% versus 33.6%; p = 0.037, respectively). No significant change was found for the primary, secondary, or tertiary patterns for the control group or for the primary pattern associated with the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of TCM patterns in this study permitted statistical evaluation of TCM pattern change. Previously, TCM pattern identification had only been used as a basis for developing the treatment protocol in clinical trials. This is the first time it has been employed as a novel outcome measure.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Christine.Berle@uts.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 16  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hepatitis C
  Disease Category Liver Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 66  
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