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Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2554  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2595  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2644  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2685  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2718  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2759  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2800  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2841  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2882  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, R.-L.; Shen, G.-M.; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brain functional connectivity network studies of acupuncture: a systematic review on resting-state fMRI Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-33  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Alternative medicine; Complementary medicine; Functional connectivity; Functional network; Resting-state functional magnetic resonance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel method for studying the changes of brain networks due to acupuncture treatment. In recent years, more and more studies have focused on the brain functional connectivity network of acupuncture stimulation. OBJECTIVE: To offer an overview of the different influences of acupuncture on the brain functional connectivity network from studies using resting-state fMRI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The authors performed a systematic search according to PRISMA guidelines. The database PubMed was searched from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2016 with restriction to human studies in English language. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed using the keywords “acupuncture” and “neuroimaging” or “resting-state fMRI” or “functional connectivity”. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: Selection of included articles, data extraction and methodological quality assessments were respectively conducted by two review authors. RESULTS: Forty-four resting-state fMRI studies were included in this systematic review according to inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies applied manual acupuncture vs. sham, four studies applied electro-acupuncture vs. sham, two studies also compared transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation vs. sham, and nine applied sham acupoint as control. Nineteen studies with a total number of 574 healthy subjects selected to perform fMRI only considered healthy adult volunteers. The brain functional connectivity of the patients had varying degrees of change. Compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could increase default mode network and sensorimotor network connectivity with pain-, affective- and memory-related brain areas. It has significantly greater connectivity of genuine acupuncture between the periaqueductal gray, anterior cingulate cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex, right anterior insula, limbic/paralimbic and precuneus compared with sham acupuncture. Some research had also shown that acupuncture could adjust the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, brainstem, cerebellum, subcortical and hippocampus brain areas. CONCLUSION: It can be presumed that the functional connectivity network is closely related to the mechanism of acupuncture, and central integration plays a critical role in the acupuncture mechanism.  
  Address Graduate School of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230012, Anhui Province, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29397089 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2923  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, X. M.; Wu, J. openurl 
  Title The mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating method for acupuncture treatment of delayed menstrual cycle--a clinical controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit.Chin Med.  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 35-38  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Menstruation Disturbances; Oligomenorrhea; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Other Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Menstruation-Regulating Method  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method with the routine acupuncture method in treating delayed menstrual cycle. METHODS: 40 patients with delayed menstrual cycle were randomly divided into a treatment group of 23 cases (treated by the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method), and a control group of 17 cases (treated by the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle due to stagnation of the liver-qi). The treatment involved three menstrual cycles. The evaluations were done by scoring the symptoms before treatment and at the end of each menstrual cycle. RESULTS: After treatment, significant differences were found between the two groups in the therapeutic effects (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The therapeutic effect of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method is significantly superior to that of the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle  
  Address College of Acupuncture and Massage, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, Sichuan, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Oligomenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 104  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electro-acupuncture for post-stroke spasticity: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; meta-analysis; muscle spasticity; spasticity; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and AMED) and four Chinese databases (CBM, CNKI, CQVIP and Wanfang) were searched from their inception to September 2016. DATA SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electro-acupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function and activity of daily living were extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials met the search criteria and were included involving 1,425 participants. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in upper limb measured by MAS (SMD: -0.57[-0.84, -0.29]) and improve overall motor function measured by FMA (MD: 10.60[8.67, 12.53]) were significant. It was also found that for spasticity in lower limb, lower-limb motor function and activity of daily living, significant add-on effects of EA were also shown (SMD: -0.88[-1.42, -0.35], MD:4.42[0.06, 8.78] and MD: 6.85[3.64, 10.05] respectively), though with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA was received. CONCLUSIONS: Electro-acupuncture combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in upper and lower limb and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activity of daily living for spasticity patients within 180 days post stroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for post-stroke spasticity incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2185  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2461  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2502  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2543  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2584  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2625  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2653  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2694  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2748  
Permanent link to this record
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