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Author Acupuncture Research Resource Centre url  openurl
  Title Sports Injuries and Acupuncture: The Evidence for Effectiveness Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit Acupun  
  Volume 11 A2 Issue (up) Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Wounds and Injuries; Sports Medicine; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sports Medicine
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 3  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; Romoli, M.; Rolando, S.; Airola, G.; Castagnoli Gabellari, I.; Allais, R.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Ear acupuncture in the treatment of migraine attacks: a randomized trial on the efficacy of appropriate versus inappropriate acupoints Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 1/1/1970 Issue (up) Pages S173-5  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Headache Disorders; Migraine; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Auricular Acupuncture; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Needle Contact Test; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Other Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ear acupuncture can be a useful mean for controlling migraine pain. It has been shown that a technique called the Needle Contact Test (NCT) can identify the most efficacious ear acupoints for reducing current migraine pain through just a few seconds of needle contact. The majority of the points were located on the antero-internal part of the antitragus (area M) on the same side of pain. The aim of this study was to verify the therapeutic value of area M and to compare it with an area of the ear (representation of the sciatic nerve, area S) which probably does not have a therapeutic effect on migraine attacks. We studied 94 females suffering from migraine without aura, diagnosed according to the ICHD-II criteria, during the attack. They were randomly subdivided into two groups: in group A, tender points located in area M, positive to NCT were inserted; in group B, the unsuitable area (S) was treated. Changes in pain intensity were measured using a VAS scale at various times of the study. During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of the VAS value in group A (Anova for repeated measures: p < 0.001), whereas no significance was observed in group B. VAS values were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after needle insertion. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.  
  Address Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Women's Headache Center, University of Turin, Via Ventimiglia 3, 10126 Turin, Italy. gb.allais@tiscali.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 19  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Axelsson, A.; Andersson, S.; Gu, L. D. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the management of tinnitus: A placebo controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1994 Publication Abbreviated Journal Audiology  
  Volume 33 Issue (up) Pages 351-360  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Sham TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tinnitus; Verum Acupoint Control; Ear Diseases; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract The present study was performed on 20 patients randomly selected from a large group with noise-induced tinnitus in order to investigate the effect of acupuncture on their tinnitus. The patients were divided into two groups. One group first received classical Chinese needle acupuncture for 5 weeks, and the other was given a placebo procedure; after a 2-week interval, the procedures were reversed. A single-blind cross-over design was used. Acupuncture was given by a Chinese otolaryngologist around the ear as well as at distal points on the extremities. Placebo consisted of mock electrical stimulation via surface electrodes connected to a Chinese electro-acupuncture stimulator which delivered a weak sound and a light flash at a frequency of 2 Hz but no current to the surface electrodes. The effect was evaluated by the use of visual analogue scales. No significant difference between acupuncture and placebo was found in annoyance, awareness or loudness of the tinnitus. Many patients indicated a preference for acupuncture due to unspecific effects such as improved sleep, decreased muscle tension and improved blood circulation. It is concluded that acupuncture has no specific alleviating effect on noise-induced tinnitus.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 47  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Black, S.; Carey, E.; Webber, A.; Neish, N.; Gilbert, R. url  openurl
  Title Determining the efficacy of auricular acupuncture for reducing anxiety in patients withdrawing from psychoactive drugs Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of substance abuse treatment Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Substance-Related Disorders; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Auricular Acupuncture; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Group Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a widely accepted treatment option for substance abuse that is used in more than 700 treatment centers worldwide. Despite claims of perceived clinical benefits by patients and treatment staff, research efforts have failed to substantiate purported benefits, and the mechanism(s) by which AA serves in the treatment of addiction remain inconclusive. Numerous studies have shown AA to be an effective treatment for perioperative anxiety. In this study, we hypothesize that AA reduces the anxiety associated with withdrawal from psychoactive drugs. The study used a randomized, controlled design and included a sample of 101 patients recruited from an addiction treatment service. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatment groups (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association [NADA] AA, AA at sham points, or treatment setting control) and were instructed to attend treatment sessions for 3 days. The primary outcome measure state anxiety was assessed using a pretest-posttest treatment design. The study hypothesis was not confirmed. The NADA protocol was not more effective than sham or treatment setting control in reducing anxiety. The widespread acceptance of AA in the treatment of addiction remains controversial.  
  Address Addiction Prevention and Treatment Services, Capital District Health Authority, PO Box 896, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada B2Y 3Z6.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 101  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Anxiety
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 77  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bower, W. F.; Diao, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a treatment for nocturnal enuresis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Autonomic neuroscience : basic &amp; clinical Abbreviated Journal Auton Neurosci  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Nocturnal Enuresis; Urologic Diseases; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bed Wetting  
  Abstract Acupuncture can influence spinal micturition centers and parasympathetic innervation to the urinary tract and is known to modulate brain function via the descending serotonergic system. There are numerous difficulties in evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in patients with nocturnal enuresis (NE), since the patient group is frequently heterogenous and the intervention is commonly given in association with other modalities. Until recently incomplete reporting of the quality aspects of studies has also limited evaluation of treatment effects. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate reports from both Western and Eastern medicines in which acupuncture was compared to some other treatment modality in children with nocturnal enuresis. Focusing on Chinese language sources 41 new studies of acupuncture for NE were identified, 13 of which were clinical trials that reported parameters of treatment and defined outcome measures of efficacy. A standardized data extraction form was used to evaluate outcome measures and to scrutinize the quality aspects of studies. All barr one study reported the efficacy rate of acupuncture as part of a TCM package to be higher than alarm therapy, the gold standard of Western medicine intervention for NE. Acupuncture as a monotherapy for the treatment of NE appears to be less effective than acupuncture given as part of a combined Traditional Chinese Medicine approach. Electroacupuncture enhances treatment outcomes.  
  Address Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Nocturnal Enuresis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 87  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Carlsson, C. P.; Axemo, P.; al, Bodin A et url  openurl
  Title Manual acupuncture reduces hyperemesis gravidarum: A placebo-controlled, randomized, single-blind, cross-over study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Pain Symptom Manage  
  Volume 20 Issue (up) Pages 273-279  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hyperemesis Gravidarum; Penetrating Sham; Morning Sickness; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract Hyperemesis gravidarum, severe vomiting, develops in about 1-2% of all pregnancies. Acupuncture on the point PC6 above the wrist on the palmar side has been found to prevent some types of nausea and vomiting. The purpose of the present study was to see if acupuncture, in addition to standard treatment, could hasten the improvement of hyperemesis gravidarum. Thirty-three women with hyperemesis were evaluated in a randomized, single-blind, crossover comparison of two methods of acupuncture, active (deep) PC6 acupuncture or placebo (superficial) acupuncture. The women estimated their degree of nausea on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The daily number of emesis episodes were documented. Crossover analyses showed that there was a significantly faster reduction of nausea VAS and more women who stopped vomiting after active acupuncture than after placebo acupuncture. This study suggests that active PC6 acupuncture, in combination with standard treatment, could make women with hyperemesis gravidarum better faster than placebo acupuncture  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 74  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 114  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ceccherelli, F.; Gioioso, L.; Casale, R.; Gagliardi, G.; Ori, C. url  openurl
  Title Neck Pain Treatment With Acupuncture: Does the Number of Needles Matter? Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords RCT; AcuTrials; Neck Pain; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Acupuncture has been successfully used in myofascial pain syndromes. However, the number of needles used, that is, the dose" of acupuncture stimulation, to obtain the best antinociceptive efficacy is still a matter of debate. The question was addressed comparing the clinical efficacy of two different therapeutic schemes, characterized by a different number of needles used on 36 patients between 29 – 60 years of age with by a painful cervical myofascial syndrome. METHODS: Patients were divided into two groups; the first group of 18 patients were treated with 5 needles and the second group of 18 patients were treated with 11 needles, the time of needle stimulation was the same in both groups: 100 seconds. Each group underwent six cycles of somatic acupuncture. Pain intensity was evaluated before, immediately after and 1 and 3 months after the treatment by means of both the Mc Gill Pain Questionnaire and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). In both groups, the needles were fixed superficially excluding the two most painful trigger points where they were deeply inserted. RESULTS: Both groups, independently from the number of needles used, obtained a good therapeutic effect without clinically relevant differences. CONCLUSIONS: For this pathology, the number of needles, 5 or 11, seems not to be an important variable in determining the therapeutic effect when the time of stimulation is the same in the two groups.  
  Address *Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova daggerA.I.R.A.S. (Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca e l'Aggiornamento Scientifico), Padova double daggerService of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Florence section signRehabilitat  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 122  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheong, Y.; Nardo, L. G.; Rutherford, T.; Ledger, W. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and herbal medicine in in vitro fertilisation: a review of the evidence for clinical practice Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Human fertility (Cambridge, England) Abbreviated Journal Hum Fertil (Camb)  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; Infertility, Female; Women's Health; AcuTrials; Acupuncture; IVF  
  Abstract The objectives of this systematic review were to determine the effectiveness of (a) acupuncture and (b) Chinese herbal medicine on the treatment of male and female subfertility by assisted reproductive technologies (ART). All reports from RCTs of acupuncture and/or Chinese herbal medicine in ART were obtained via searches through The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Sub-fertility Group's Specialised Register of controlled trials, and other major databases. The outcome measures were determined prior to starting the search, and comprised: live birth rate, ongoing pregnancy rate, clinical pregnancy rate, the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancy, miscarriage rate and adverse effects arising from treatment. Overall, 14 trials (a total of 2670 subjects) were included in the meta-analysis. The results provided no evidence of benefit in the use of acupuncture during assisted conception. Further studies should attempt to explore the potential placebo, as well as treatment, effects of this complimentary therapy. Essential elements for a quality RCT will be the size of the trial, the use of a standardised acupuncture method and of placebo needles.  
  Address Division of Developmental Origins of Adult Diseases, University of Southampton School of Medicine (DOHaD), Level F, Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton, UK.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 160  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S. H.; Lee, H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for pain relief in labour: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Abbreviated Journal BJOG  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Analgesia; Labor, Obstetric; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Pain; Labor Pain; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract Please cite this paper as: Cho S-H, Lee H, Ernst E. Acupuncture for pain relief in labour: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJOG 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02570.x. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is frequently used for pain relief in labour, but the evidence is not clear. OBJECTIVES: To critically evaluate the evidence for or against acupuncture for labour pain management. SEARCH STRATEGY: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving women receiving acupuncture alone, or as an adjunct to conventional analgesia, for pain relief in labour were considered. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Pain intensity on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS; 0, no pain; 100, worst pain) and use of other analgesic methods were used as primary outcomes, and for statistical pooling. Maternal/fetal outcomes were secondary outcomes, and adverse events were also recorded. Risk of bias was assessed regarding randomisation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other biases. MAIN RESULTS: Ten RCTs involving 2038 women were included. VAS for pain intensity data were available in seven studies; the meta-analysis shows that acupuncture was not superior to minimal acupuncture at 1 hour (pooled mean difference -8.02; 95% CI -21.88, 5.84; I(2) = 94%) and at 2 hours (-10.15; 95% CI -23.18, 2.87; I(2) = 92%). Patients reported significantly reduced pain by 4 and 6% during electroacupuncture (EA) treatment at 15 (-4.09; 95% CI -8.05, -0.12) and 30 minutes (-5.94; 95% CI -9.83, -2.06), compared with placebo EA, but the effect was not maintained afterwards. Compared with no intervention, acupuncture reduced pain by only 11% for the first 30 minutes (-10.56; 95% CI -16.08, -5.03). In trials where acupuncture was compared with conventional analgesia, women receiving acupuncture required less meperidine (pooled risk ratio 0.20; 95% CI 0.12, 0.33) and other analgesic methods (0.75; 95% CI 0.66, 0.85). No acupuncture-related adverse events were reported. Most trials did not blind participants, care providers and/or evaluators. AUTHOR'S CONCLUSIONS: The evidence from RCTs does not support the use of acupuncture for controlling labour pain. The primary studies are diverse and often flawed. Further research seems warranted.  
  Address Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Analgesia
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S. H.; Whang, W. W. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Alcohol Dependence: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Acupuncture; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used in the treatment of substance-related disorders for the past 30 years. However, a systematic review to assess the effect of various types of acupuncture for alcohol dependence has not yet been performed. The present systematic review assessed the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs of acupuncture for alcohol dependence up to June 2008 with no language restrictions. The methodological qualities of eligible studies were assessed using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook. Results: Eleven studies, which comprised a total of 1,110 individual cases, were systematically reviewed. Only 2 of 11 trials reported satisfactorily all quality criteria. Four trials comparing acupuncture treatment and sham treatments reported data for alcohol craving. Three studies reported that there were no significant differences. Among 4 trials comparing acupuncture and no acupuncture with conventional therapies, 3 reported significant reductions. No differences between acupuncture and sham treatments were found for completion rates (Risk Ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.91 to 1.25) or acupuncture and no acupuncture (Risk Ratio = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.67). Only 3 RCTs reported acupuncture-related adverse events, which were mostly minimal. Conclusions: The results of the included studies were equivocal, and the poor methodological quality and the limited number of the trials do not allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of alcohol dependence. More research and well-designed, rigorous, and large clinical trials are necessary to address these issues  
  Address From the Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 177  
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Author David, J.; Modi, S.; Aluko, A.A.et al url  openurl
  Title Chronic neck pain: A comparison of acupuncture treatment and physiotherapy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit J Rheumatol  
  Volume 37 Issue (up) Pages 1118-2230  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Neck Pain; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture, as compared with physiotherapy, in the management of chronic neck pain. DESIGN: Seventy adult patients with non-inflammatory neck pain of >6 weeks duration and with no abnormal neurology were randomly assigned to receive either of the treatments. Thirty-five patients were included in each group. OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain by visual analogue scale and neck pain questionnaire, improvement in range of movement of neck relative to baseline, and well-being (general health questionnaire). Measurements were recorded at the start of treatment, at 6 weeks and at 6 months. RESULTS: Both treatment groups improved in all criteria. Acupuncture was slightly more effective in patients who had higher baseline pain scores. CONCLUSIONS: Both acupuncture and physiotherapy are effective forms of treatment. Since an untreated control group was not part of the study design, the magnitude of this improvement cannot be quantified  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 223  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dieterle, S.; Li, C.; Greb, R.; Bartzsch, F.; Hatzmann, W.; Huang, D. url  openurl
  Title A prospective randomized placebo-controlled study of the effect of acupuncture in infertile patients with severe oligoasthenozoospermia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Fertil Steril  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Infertility, Male; Oligoasthenozoospermia; RCT; Sperm Concentration; Sperm Morphology; Sperm Motility; Sperm Quality; Genital Diseases, Male; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials  
  Abstract In this first prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study, 28 infertile patients with severe oligoasthenozoospermia received acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and 29 infertile patients received placebo acupuncture. A significantly higher percentage of motile sperm (World Health Organization categories A-C), but no effect on sperm concentration, was found after acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture  
  Address Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Witten/Herdecke, Dortmund, Germany; Infertility Center Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Infertility, Male
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 246  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Enblom, A.; Johnsson, A.; Hammar, M.; Onelov, E.; Steineck, G.; Borjeson, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture in radiotherapy-induced nausea--a randomized controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO Abbreviated Journal Ann Oncol  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Emesis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is not known if verum (real) acupuncture is effective for nausea and vomiting (emesis) during radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomly treated 215 blinded cancer patients with verum: penetrating 'deqi' creating acupuncture (n = 109) or non-penetrating sham needles (n = 106) two to three times per week. The patients documented emesis daily during the radiotherapy period. Primary end point was the number of patients with at least one episode of nausea. RESULTS: In the verum and the sham acupuncture group, 70% and 62% experienced nausea at least once during the radiotherapy period (relative risk 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) for a mean number of 10.1 and 8.7 days. Twenty five percent and 28% vomited, and 42% and 37% used antiemetic drugs at least once, respectively. Ninety-five percent in the verum acupuncture group and 96% in the sham acupuncture group believed that the treatment had been effective against nausea. In both groups, 67% experienced positive effects on relaxation, mood, sleep or pain reduction and 89% wished to receive the treatment again. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture creating deqi is not more effective than sham in radiotherapy-induced nausea, but in this study, nearly all patients in both groups experienced that the treatment was effective for nausea.  
  Address Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 13  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 237  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Nausea
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 290  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ernst, E.; Lee, M. S.; Choi, T. Y. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Depression? A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Evaluation & the health professions Abbreviated Journal Eval Health Prof  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression;  
  Abstract Acupuncture is often advocated as a treatment for depression, and several trials have tested its effectiveness. Their results are contradictory and even systematic reviews of these data do not arrive at uniform conclusions. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate all systematic reviews of the subject with a view of assisting clinical decisions. Thirteen electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant articles. Data of these systematic reviews and the primary studies they included were extracted independently by the two authors according to predefined criteria. Eight systematic reviews including seventy-one primary studies were found. Five of the reviews arrived at positive conclusions and three did not. All the positive reviews and most of the positive primary studies originated from China. There are reasons to believe that these reviews are less than reliable. In conclusion, the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment of depression remains unproven and the authors' findings are consistent with acupuncture effects in depression being indistinguishable from placebo effects.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorder OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 298  
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Author Franasiak, J.; Young, S. L.; Williams, C. D.; Pastore, L. M. url  openurl
  Title Longitudinal anti-mullerian hormone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: an acupuncture randomized clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2012 Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Others have studied acupuncture treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is positively correlated with the ovarian follicle pool, thus making it a useful ovarian reserve measure. AMH is elevated in women with PCOS and has been suggested as a diagnostic tool. This study examined the impact of electroacupuncture on AMH concentration in women with PCOS. Seventy-one women with PCOS participated in a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial of acupuncture. Three longitudinal AMH samples over the 5-month protocol were compared with objective ovulation parameters primarily using nonparametric statistics. Results indicated that AMH levels in PCOS were higher than published norms in women without PCOS. There was no difference between the true and sham acupuncture arms in the change in AMH longitudinally. Baseline AMH, but not the change in AMH over time, was inversely correlated with ovulation and menstrual cycle frequencies in both arms combined (P < 0.001). In conclusion, AMH correlated with an increased likelihood of monthly ovulation, as expected from the literature on women without PCOS. The lack of difference by intervention in AMH was consistent with the underlying clinical trial. AMH may be clinically useful to predict which PCOS women are more likely to respond to an intervention.  
  Address Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7570, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 71  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 335  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frisk, J. url  openurl
  Title Managing hot flushes in men after prostate cancer-A systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Maturitas Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume 65 Issue (up) Pages 15-22  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Prostatic Neoplasms; Hot Flashes; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Prostate Cancer;  
  Abstract CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe hot flushes in men with prostate cancer, and their treatment methods. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted of the literature indexed between 1966 and 2009 on the MEDLINE, the ISI Web of Knowledge, Cinahl and PsycINFO. Of 252 articles identified, 32 were selected for consideration of their complete texts, of which five were subject to detailed analysis. RESULTS: Diethylstilbestrol, megestrol acetate and cyproterone acetate have the strongest effect, giving a 75% or larger decrease of the number of hot flushes, but they may have severe or bothersome side-effects. Gabapentin has an uncertain effect. Clonidine is not proven effective for hot flushes. Long-term effects were not evaluated in any of the studies. SSRI/SNRI and acupuncture may have a moderate effect on hot flushes but are not proven in any RCTs. CONCLUSION: Hot flushes are common and bothersome symptoms in men with prostate cancer and those taking anti-androgen treatment, and reduce quality of life. Few treatments are available and some are avoided for these patients. Additional prospective treatment studies are needed, with long-term follow-up, in order to evaluate the effects and risks of treatments. Treatments with few or no severe side-effects should be prioritised in future investigations. Experimental studies are also needed to elucidate the mechanism behind hot flushes in men and to suggest routes for the development of new treatments.  
  Address Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Sweden; Department of Surgery, County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 340  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frisk, J.; Kallstrom, A. C.; Wall, N.; Fredrikson, M.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in breast cancer survivors with vasomotor symptoms. METHODS: Forty-five women, randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months, were followed for up to 2 years. Distress caused by, and numbers of, hot flushes, hours slept and times woken up/night, Psychological and General Well-being Index (PGWB) and Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) were registered before and during treatment and at 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after start of treatment. RESULTS: After 12 weeks of EA (n = 19), WHQ improved from 0.32 (IQR 0.23-0.53) at baseline to 0.24 (IQR 0.12-0.39; p &lt; 0.001) and PGWB from 78 (IQR 53-89) to 79 (IQR 68-93; p = 0.002). All sleep parameters improved and Hot Flush Score (HFS) decreased by 80%. At 12 months, WHQ, PGWB and all sleep parameters remained significantly improved (n = 14) and HFS decreased by 65%. After 12 weeks of HT (n = 18), WHQ improved from 0.29 (IQR 0.15-0.44) at baseline to 0.15 (IQR 0.05-0.22; p = 0.001), PGWB from 75 (IQR 59-88) to 90 (62-97; p = 0.102) and three of five sleep parameters improved. CONCLUSION: Both EA and HT increased HRQoL and sleep, probably through decreasing numbers of and distress by hot flushes. Although flushes decreased less in the EA group than in the HT group, HRQoL improved at least to the same extent maybe due to other effects of EA, not induced by HT, e.g. on anxiety, vitality and sleep, supported by subscale analyses. EA should be further evaluated as treatment for women with breast cancer and climacteric complaints, since HT no longer can be recommended for these women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, University Hospital, 581 85, Linkoping, Sweden, Jessica.frisk@liu.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 96 Weeks Frequency Number of Participants 45  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes; Breast Neoplasms
  Disease Category Climacteric; Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 343  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gazi, M. C.; Issy, A. M.; Avila, I. P.; Sakata, R. K. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of Acupuncture to Injection for Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain Pract  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Acu Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: Many treatments have been proposed for myofascial pain syndrome. The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of acupuncture to trigger point injection combined with cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate and sodium dipyrone. Methods: A randomized study was performed in 30 patients divided into 2 groups: G1 received trigger point injection with 0.25% bupivacaine twice weekly, and both cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate 10 mg/day and sodium dipyrone 500 mg every 8 hours; G2 received classical and trigger point acupuncture twice weekly. All patients were instructed in physical exercise. The following parameters were evaluated: pain intensity rated on a numerical scale, number of trigger points, and quality of life before and 4 weeks after treatment. Results: The pain scores and the number of trigger points reduced significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. Significant improvement in the quality of life scores was observed for some of the functional domains in the 2 groups, whereas there was no improvement of the general health status domain in either group or of the emotional domain in G1. Conclusion: Acupuncture, when compared with trigger point injection, combined with cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate and sodium dipyrone provided similar pain relief and improvement in quality of life measures at 4 weeks. blacksquare, square, filled.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 371  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hammerschlag, R.; Morris, M. M. openurl 
  Title Clinical trials comparing acupuncture to biomedical standard care: A criteria-based evaluation of research design and reporting Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal Compl Ther Med  
  Volume 5 Issue (up) Pages 133-140  
  Keywords TENS; AcuTrials; TENS; Migraine; Headache Disorders; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders; Shoulder Pain; Renal Colic; Low Back Pain; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Pain, Postoperative; TMD; TMJ; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Variable
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author He, L.; Zhou, D.; Wu, B.; Li, N.; Zhou, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Bell's palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 1 Issue (up) Pages CD002914-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bell Palsy; Facial Paralysis; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2002), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2002), LILACS (from January 1982 to December 2002) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to December 2002) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two reviewers assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the reviewers. MAIN RESULTS: Three studies including a total of 238 patients met the inclusion criteria. Two of them used acupuncture while the third used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review.Three included studies showed that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture alone was superior to that of medication or that acupuncture combined with medication was better than medication alone. Harmful side-effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in study design or reporting (particularly uncertain allocation concealment and substantial loss to follow-up) and clinical differences between trials prevented a meta-analysis. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high quality trials is needed  
  Address Department of Neurology, First University Hospital, West China University of Medical Sciences, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, CHINA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Bell Palsy
  Disease Category Cranial Nerve Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 445  
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