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Author Liu, T. T.; Shi, J.; Epstein, D. H.; Bao, Y. P.; Lu, L. url  openurl
  Title A Meta-Analysis of Acupuncture Combined with Opioid Receptor Agonists for Treatment of Opiate-Withdrawal Symptoms Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cell Mol Neurobiol  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Detoxification; Heroin Dependence; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Opioid-Related Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract This review extends a prior meta-analysis of acupuncture's utility for treating opioid detoxification, addressing the efficacy of acupuncture when combined with allopathic therapies. Both English and Chinese databases were searched for randomized trials comparing acupuncture combined with opioid agonist treatment versus opioid agonists alone for treating symptoms of opioid withdrawal. The methodological quality of each study was assessed with Jadad's scale (1-2 = low; 3-5 = high). Meta-analysis was performed with fixed- or random-effect models in RevMan software; the outcome measures assessed were withdrawal-symptoms score, relapse rate, side effects, and medication dosage. Withdrawal-symptom scores were lower in combined treatment trials than in agonist-alone trials on withdrawal days 1, 7, 9, and 10. Combined treatment also produced lower reported rates of side effects and appeared to lower the required dose of opioid agonist. There was no significant difference on relapse rate after 6 months. This meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture combined with opioid agonists can effectively be used to manage the withdrawal symptoms. One limitation of this meta-analysis is the poor quality of the methodology of some included trials. High-quality studies are needed to confirm findings regarding the side effects and medication dosage  
  Address National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, 38, Xue Yuan Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100083, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Opioid-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 756  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.; Ju, Y.; Zhang, E. openurl 
  Title Upper Urinary Tract Calculi Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Chin Med  
  Volume 58 Issue (up) Pages 15-19  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Kidney Diseases; RCT; Renal Calculi; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Calculi; Urinary Stones; Urologic Diseases;  
  Abstract An acupuncture protocol consisting of Huatuojiaji points at T12, L1 and L2, Huangmen Bl-51, Zhishi Bl-32 and Weiyang Bl-37 has been designed by Professor Liu Yutan for the treatment of urinary calculi. Our clinical and animal experiments have shown that the therapeutic effect of the above acupuncture protocol is superior to the current commonly-used acupuncture protocol. Our clinical research shows that the cured rates were 45.4% and 91.6% in treating renal and ureteral calculus respectively, which were significantly higher than a routine method (P<0.05). Our animal experiment revealed that needling the Huatoujiaji point at L1 can increase the peristalsis of the renal pelvis and ureter and affect the internal pressure of the renal pelvis and quantity of urine, which can thus facilitate stone-discharge.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Urinary Caliculi
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 761  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.; Zhang, L. openurl 
  Title The TCM-combined treatment for aphasia due to cerebrovascular disorders Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 22-24  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Aphasia; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nervous System Diseases; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Speech Disorders; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 60  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Aphasia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score 40  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 762  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lomuscio, A.; Belletti, S.; Battezzati, P. M.; Lombardi, F. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture in Preventing Atrial Fibrillation Recurrences After Electrical Cardioversion Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of cardiovascular electrophysiology Abbreviated Journal J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Cardiovascular Diseases; Atrial Fibrillation; Acupuncture; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Antiarrhythmic Effect of Acupuncture. Introduction: In traditional Chinese medicine, stimulation of the Neiguan spot has been utilized to treat palpitations. We evaluated whether acupuncture might prevent or reduce the rate of arrhythmia recurrences in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods and Results: We studied 80 patients with persistent AF after restoring sinus rhythm with electrical cardioversion. Twenty-six subjects who were already on amiodarone treatment constituted the AMIO reference group. The remaining patients were randomly allocated to receive acupuncture (ACU group, n = 17), sham acupuncture (ACU-sham group, n = 13), or neither acupuncture nor antiarrhythmic therapy (CONTROL group, n = 24). Patients in the ACU and ACU-sham groups attended 10 acupuncture sessions on a once-a-week basis. Only in the former group the Neiguan, Shenmen, and Xinshu spots were punctured. During a 12-month follow-up, AF recurred in 35 patients. Cumulative AF recurrence rates in the AMIO, ACU, ACU-sham, and CONTROL patients were 27%, 35%, 69%, and 54%, respectively (P = 0.0075, log-rank test). Ejection fraction (P = 0.0005), hypertension (0.0293), and left atrial diameter (P = 0.0361) were also significantly associated with AF recurrence. Compared with AMIO group, recurrence rate was similar in ACU patients (hazard ratio: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.38-3.49; P = 0.801) but significantly higher in ACU-sham and CONTROL patients (3.77, 1.39-10; P = 0.009 and 3.15, 1.23-8.06; P = 0.017, respectively) after adjustment for ejection fraction, hypertension, and left atrial diameter using Cox modeling. Conclusion: Our data indicate that acupuncture treatment prevents arrhythmic recurrences after cardioversion in patients with persistent AF. This minimally invasive procedure was safe and well tolerated. (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. pp. 1-7).  
  Address Cardiologia, Osp. San Paolo, Dipartimento di Medicina, Chirurgia e Odontoiatria, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Atrial Fibrillation
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 766  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lu, S. C.; Zheng, Z.; Xue, C. C. url  openurl
  Title Does acupuncture improve quality of life for patients with pain associated with the spine? A systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2011 Issue (up) Pages 301767-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Acupuncture  
  Abstract This paper aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture for qualities of life (QoL) in patients suffering from pain associated with the spine (PAWS). Acupuncture has been shown to reduce pain severity, but its effect on QoL is unknown. PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as well as EMBASE were searched. Published randomized controlled trials on PAWS comparing acupuncture with waiting-list or sham interventions were considered. Eight out of 186 trials were included. For physical functioning, acupuncture was better than waiting-list at immediate and short-term followups; and was better than sham interventions at immediate assessment (SMD = 0.40. 95% CI 0.06 to 0.74). For mental functioning, acupuncture was better than waiting-list at short-term followup and sham interventions at intermediate-term followup (SMD = 0.27. 95% CI 0.03 to 0.51). A similar effect was observed on pain reduction. Discrepancies in point selection for relieving anxiety and insufficient training of trial acupuncturists were also identified. Acupuncture has a moderate effect on the improvement of physical functioning and pain for PAWS patients in the short term; but the effect for mental functioning is small and delayed. Future trials should address point selection and consistency in the qualifications of trial acupuncturists.  
  Address Traditional & Complementary Medicine Research Program, Health Innovations Research Institute and Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 774  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Luo, H.; Meng, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, X. url  openurl
  Title Clinical research on the therapeutic effect of the electro-acupuncture treatment in patients with depression Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Clin Neurosci  
  Volume 52 Suppl Issue (up) Pages S338-S340  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Adverse Effects; Bipolar Disorder; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation has been found to influence the brain (norepinephrine metabolism in experimental animals). Preliminary clinical research has shown that EA treatment is as effective as amitriptyline for patients with depression. In this study, two consecutive clinical studies on the treatment of depression with EA are conducted. The first study was double blind placebo controlled, in which 29 depressed inpatients were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: EA + placebo; amitriptyline; and EA + amitriptyline. They received EA and/or amitriptyline treatment for 6 weeks. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Clinical Global Impression and ASBERG scales for the side effect of antidepressants were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side effects. Based on the results and research protocol of the first study, a multi-centered collaborative study was conducted, in which 241 inpatients with depression were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into two treatment groups: the EA + placebo and the amitriptyline groups. The results from both studies showed that the therapeutic efficacy of EA was equal to that of amitriptyline for depressive disorders (P > 0.05). Electro-acupuncture had a better therapeutic effect for anxiety somatization and cognitive process disturbance of depressed patients than amitriptyline (P < 0.05). Moreover, the side effects of EA were much less than that of amitriptyline (P < 0.001). The article suggested that EA treatment was an effective therapeutic method for depressive disorders. Particularly, it was a treatment of choice for depressed patients who were unable to comply with the classic tricyclic antidepressants because of their anticholinergic side effects. The possible mechanism of EA treatment is discussed  
  Address Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Institute of Mental Health, Beijing Medical University, PR China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 270  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 60  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 784  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lynas, A. G.; Chestnutt, W. N.; Dundee, J. W.; Ghaly, R. G. openurl 
  Title Neiguan, the P6 anti-emetic acupuncture point: Effect on nalbuphine emetic sequelae Type of Study RCT
  Year 1986 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit J Clin Pharm  
  Volume 22 Issue (up) Pages 223-  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Nausea; Sham Acupoint Control; RCT; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Hyperemesis Gravidarum  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 786  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ma, T. T.; Yu, S. Y.; Li, Y.; Liang, F. R.; Tian, X. P.; Zheng, H.; Yan, J.; Sun, G. J.; Chang, X. R.; Zhao, L.; Wu, X.; Zeng, F. url  openurl
  Title Randomised clinical trial: an assessment of acupuncture on specific meridian or specific acupoint vs. sham acupuncture for treating functional dyspepsia. Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics Abbreviated Journal Aliment Pharmacol Ther  
  Volume 35 Issue (up) Pages 552-561  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Dyspepsia; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common disease without an established optimal treatment. AIM: To determine (i) the effect of acupuncture in relieving FD symptoms and improving life quality; (ii) the effect difference between acupoint and non-acupoint; and (iii) the effect difference among different acupoints. METHODS: A total of 712 eligible patients were included and randomly assigned to six groups (Group A: specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group B: non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group C: specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; Group D: specific acupoints of the gallbladder meridian; Group E: sham acupuncture of non-acupoints; and Group F: itopride). A treatment period of 4 weeks (continuous five sessions per week), and a follow-up period of 12 weeks were arranged. The outcomes were the (i) patients' response, (ii) symptoms improvement measured using the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia and (iii) quality-of-life improvement based on Nepean Dyspepsia Index. RESULTS: All groups had an improvement in dyspepsia symptoms and the QoL at the end of treatment, and the improvement was sustained for 4 weeks and 12 weeks. The overall response rate was significantly higher in acupuncture group A (70.69%), and lower in sham acupuncture group (34.75%), compared with itopride and other acupuncture groups. Similarly, the difference in symptoms and QoL improvement was significant between group A and the other acupuncture groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is effective in the treatment of functional dyspepsia, and is superior to non-acupoint puncture. The benefit of acupuncture relies on acupoint specificity.  
  Address Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 712  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dyspepsia
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 790  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ma, W.; Bai, W.; Lin, C.; Zhou, P.; Xia, L.; Zhao, C.; Hao, Y.; Ma, H.; Liu, X.; Wang, J.; Yuan, H.; Xie, Y.; Lu, A. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Sanyinjiao (SP6) with electroacupuncture on labour pain in women during labour Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 1/1/1970 Issue (up) Pages S13-8  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Labor, Obstetric; Analgesia; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Labor Pain; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of Sanyinjiao (SP6) with electroacupuncture on labour pain in women during the labour process. METHODS: A total of 350 women in labour from three centres were randomly divided into the electroacupuncture group (acupuncture group), the sham electroacupuncture group (sham group) and the control group. Women in labour in the electroacupuncture group received the electroacupuncture on the point Sanyinjiao (SP6). The analgesic effect was self-rated by women in labour, using visual analogue scale (VAS). The duration and paralysis time of uterine contraction, uterine contraction regularity, degree of cervical extension, presentation of foetal descent, the condition of intra-partum haemorrhage and postpartum haemorrhage, labour manner, lochia, involution of uterus, milk secretion, neonate Apgar Score and neonate body height and weight were also measured. All data were analysed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 12.0. RESULTS: Labour pain scores from women in the acupuncture group were less than in the control group at needle retaining at 30min, 2 and 4h after needle withdrawal. Other evaluated indices did not show significant differences among the three groups. No adverse events were observed during the labour process. CONCLUSION: SP6 with electroacupuncture could be an effective way for decreasing labour pain.  
  Address Beijing University of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100029, China. mawenzhu@163bj.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 350  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 792  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for low back pain: a program of pragmatic research Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal The Amer Acupuncturist  
  Volume 51 Issue (up) Pages 16-19  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Acupuncture; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Unrestricted Modalities; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 84 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 240  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 800  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Madsen, M. V.; Gotzsche, P. C.; Hrobjartsson, A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture treatment for pain: systematic review of randomised clinical trials with acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, and no acupuncture groups Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume 338 Issue (up) Pages a3115-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Analgesia; AcuTrials; Meta-Analysis; Pain; Systematic Review; RCT  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To study the analgesic effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture and to explore whether the type of the placebo acupuncture is associated with the estimated effect of acupuncture. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of three armed randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Biological Abstracts, and PsycLIT. Data extraction and analysis Standardised mean differences from each trial were used to estimate the effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture. The different types of placebo acupuncture were ranked from 1 to 5 according to assessment of the possibility of a physiological effect, and this ranking was meta-regressed with the effect of acupuncture. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirteen trials (3025 patients) involving a variety of pain conditions were eligible. The allocation of patients was adequately concealed in eight trials. The clinicians managing the acupuncture and placebo acupuncture treatments were not blinded in any of the trials. One clearly outlying trial (70 patients) was excluded. A small difference was found between acupuncture and placebo acupuncture: standardised mean difference -0.17 (95% confidence interval -0.26 to -0.08), corresponding to 4 mm (2 mm to 6 mm) on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. No statistically significant heterogeneity was present (P=0.10, I(2)=36%). A moderate difference was found between placebo acupuncture and no acupuncture: standardised mean difference -0.42 (-0.60 to -0.23). However, considerable heterogeneity (P<0.001, I(2)=66%) was also found, as large trials reported both small and large effects of placebo. No association was detected between the type of placebo acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture (P=0.60). CONCLUSIONS: A small analgesic effect of acupuncture was found, which seems to lack clinical relevance and cannot be clearly distinguished from bias. Whether needling at acupuncture points, or at any site, reduces pain independently of the psychological impact of the treatment ritual is unclear  
  Address Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Department 3343, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 806  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Manheimer, E.; Zhang, G.; Udoff, L.; Haramati, A.; Langenberg, P.; Berman, B. M.; Bouter, L. M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture on rates of pregnancy and live birth among women undergoing in vitro fertilisation: systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Embryo Transfer; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; Fertilization In Vitro; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether acupuncture improves rates of pregnancy and live birth when used as an adjuvant treatment to embryo transfer in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Cochrane Central, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Database, hand searched abstracts, and reference lists. Review methods Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials that compared needle acupuncture administered within one day of embryo transfer with sham acupuncture or no adjuvant treatment, with reported outcomes of at least one of clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, or live birth. Two reviewers independently agreed on eligibility; assessed methodological quality; and extracted outcome data. For all trials, investigators contributed additional data not included in the original publication (such as live births). Meta-analyses included all randomised patients. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seven trials with 1366 women undergoing in vitro fertilisation were included in the meta-analyses. There was little clinical heterogeneity. Trials with sham acupuncture and no adjuvant treatment as controls were pooled for the primary analysis. Complementing the embryo transfer process with acupuncture was associated with significant and clinically relevant improvements in clinical pregnancy (odds ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 2.14; number needed to treat (NNT) 10 (7 to 17); seven trials), ongoing pregnancy (1.87, 1.40 to 2.49; NNT 9 (6 to 15); five trials), and live birth (1.91, 1.39 to 2.64; NNT 9 (6 to 17); four trials). Because we were unable to obtain outcome data on live births for three of the included trials, the pooled odds ratio for clinical pregnancy more accurately represents the true combined effect from these trials rather than the odds ratio for live birth. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses on study validity variables. A prespecified subgroup analysis restricted to the three trials with the higher rates of clinical pregnancy in the control group, however, suggested a smaller non-significant benefit of acupuncture (odds ratio 1.24, 0.86 to 1.77). CONCLUSIONS: Current preliminary evidence suggests that acupuncture given with embryo transfer improves rates of pregnancy and live birth among women undergoing in vitro fertilisation  
  Address Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 2200 Kernan Drive, Kernan Hospital Mansion, Baltimore, MD 21207, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 819  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Martin-Sanchez, E.; Torralba, E.; az-Dominguez, E.; Barriga, A.; Martin, J. L. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for the treatment of fibromyalgia: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Open Rheumatol J  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages 25-29  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fibromyalgia; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Pain; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study sought to ascertain the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for fibromyalgia MATERIALS AND METHODS: THE FOLLOWING ELECTRONIC DATABASES WERE SEARCHED: PubMed; The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL); EMBASE; CINAHL; and Pascal Biomed (last date of search: January 2008). We analyzed pain intensity and patient withdrawals prior to termination of the study. A meta-analysis was performed, and a weighted global effect obtained using the inverse of variance. RESULTS: This review covered a total of 6 studies (323 subjects). No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of pain intensity (VAS): 0.02 (-0.24 a 0.28) or withdrawals: RR 0.91 (0.53 a 1.58) CONCLUSION: This systematic review found no evidence of benefit resulting from acupuncture versus placebo, as a treatment for fibromyalgia  
  Address Department of Clinical Research, Castile-La Mancha Health Research Foundation (FISCAM), Toledo, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 835  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mayhew, E.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for fibromyalgia--a systematic review of randomized clinical trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Rheumatology (Oxford)  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fibromyalgia; Pain; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract Objective. Acupuncture is often used and frequently advocated for the symptomatic treatment of fibromyalgia. A systematic review has previously demonstrated encouraging findings. As it is now outdated, we wanted to update it. Methods. We searched seven electronic databases for relevant randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The data were extracted and validated independently by both authors. As no meta-analysis seemed possible, the results were evaluated in narrative form. Results. Five RCTs met our inclusion criteria, all of which used acupuncture as an adjunct to conventional treatments. Their methodological quality was mixed and frequently low. Three RCTs suggested positive but mostly short-lived effects and two yielded negative results. There was no significant difference between the quality of the negative and the positive RCTs. All positive RCTs used electro-acupunture. Conclusion. The notion that acupuncture is an effective symptomatic treatment for fibromyaligia is not supported by the results from rigorous clinical trials. On the basis of this evidence, acupuncture cannot be recommended for fibromyalgia  
  Address Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter & Plymouth, 25 Victoria Park Road, Exeter EX2 4NT, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 837  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mendelson, G.; Selwood, T. S.; Loh, T. S.; Kidson, M. A.; Scott, D. S. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Treatment of Chronic Back Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1983 Publication Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 74 Issue (up) Pages 49-55  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Cross-Over Design; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; Back Pain;  
  Abstract Acupuncture treatment of chronic low back pain was studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trials completed by 77 patients. The patients had significantly increased depression, neuroticism, and hypochondriasis scores. Initial pain levels correlated with state-anxiety, depression, pain duration, and abnormal illness behavior measures, as well as with the intake of psychotropic but not analgesic medication. Overall reduction in pain score was 26 percent for acupuncture and 22 percent for placebo treatment; the difference was not significant (p>0.6). Analgesic drug intake was reduced to a similar extent in both groups. During the first phase of treatment, patients receiving acupuncture had a greater but not significantly different reduction in pain rating scores compared with those receiving placebo (t=0.52; p>0.6). This group showed significantly lower pain scores (p<0.05) in the second phase of the trial while receiving placebo treatment. Overall reduction in individual patient's pain score was best predicted by initial pain severity (r=o.43, p<0.001) and psychotropic drug intake (r=0.37; p<0.001). None of the variables tested predicted which patients would specifically respond to acupuncture or placebo.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 95  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 857  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ming, X.; Chen, X.; Wang, X. T.; Zhang, Z.; Kang, V.; Zimmerman-Bier, B. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for treatment of autism spectrum disorders Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2012 Issue (up) Pages 679845-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Autistic Disorder; Mental Disorders; Acupuncture; Autism  
  Abstract Background. There has been lack of reviews of evidence on efficacy, methodology, and/or safety of acupuncture in autism spectrum disorders. This paper examines the emerging evidence of the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of autistic children. Method. A literature review was completed via Medline and three Chinese search engines. A total of 31 studies were evaluated for acupuncture methodology, study design, treatment effects, and tolerability. Results. The acupoints used, the duration of needling, the frequency of treatment, the choice of stimulation, and the course of the treatment were highly variable amongst the studies. Behavioral and/or developmental improvements were reported in all acupuncture treatment studies. All studies reported general tolerability. Weakness of experimental designs was discussed. Conclusions. Vigorously controlled double-blinded clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in children with autism spectrum disorders.  
  Address Department of Neurosciences and Neurology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, DOC 8100, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Autistic Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorder OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 875  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Naeser, M. A.; Alexander, M. P.; Stiassny-Eder, D. openurl 
  Title Real Versus Sham Acupuncture in the Treatment of Paralysis in Acute Stroke Patients: A CT Scan Lesion Site Study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1992 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Neuro Rehab  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) Pages 163-173  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Stroke; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Sham Electroacupuncture; Standard Needling Depth; Stroke; Unspecified Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Days Frequency N/A Number of Participants 16  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 897  
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Author Nir, Y.; Huang, M. I.; Schnyer, R.; Chen, B.; Manber, R. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for postmenopausal hot flashes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Menopause; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pilot Study; RCT; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Climacteric; Postmenopause; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine whether individually tailored acupuncture is an effective treatment option for reducing postmenopausal hot flashes and improving quality of life. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study, 29 postmenopausal participants averaging at least seven moderate to severe hot flashes per 24h, with a baseline estradiol concentration of less than 50pg/mL and a normal TSH level, were randomized to receive 7 weeks (nine treatment sessions) of either active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture (placebo needles that did not penetrate the skin at sham acupuncture points). Participants recorded hot flashes in logs that were reported daily. Global indices of the severity and frequency of hot flashes were derived from the participants' daily logs. RESULTS: Participants receiving the active treatment had a greater reduction in hot flash severity (24.5+/-30.7%) compared to those receiving placebo (4.4+/-17.1%, P=0.042). Within group repeated measures analyses of variance revealed a significant reduction in hot flash severity in the active (P=0.042), but not in the placebo treatment group (P=0.15). Although there was no significant group difference in the reduction of hot flash frequency between the active (42.4+/-32.2%) and placebo groups (32.0+/-26.5%; P>/=0.352), within group repeated measures analyses of variance revealed that the reduction was statistically significant in both groups (P</=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Standardized, individually tailored acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly greater decrease in the severity, but not the frequency, of hot flashes, in symptomatic postmenopausal women when compared to placebo acupuncture of equal duration. Future, larger scale, studies are needed  
  Address Stanford University School of Medicine, United States  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 70  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 913  
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Author Painovich, J.; Herman, P. M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the inpatient acute care setting: a pragmatic, randomized control trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2012 Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Miscellaneous; Acupuncture; Acu Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Other Acupuncture Style; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; No Treatment Control; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract Purpose. To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of acupuncture in a hospital setting. Methods. This 18-month pragmatic randomized controlled trial used a two-tiered consent process for all patients admitted to the acute care unit by study physician groups. The primary study comparison was between those randomized (using biased-coin randomization after initial consent) to be offered acupuncture or not. The primary outcome was length of stay (LOS). Other measures include costs, self-reported anxiety, depression, health status, and patient satisfaction. Results. Of the 383 patients consented to the study, 253 were randomized to be offered acupuncture, and 130 were not offered acupuncture. Of those offered acupuncture, 173 (69%) accepted and received daily acupuncture. On average, patients offered acupuncture had longer LOSs (4.9 versus 4.1 days) than those not offered acupuncture (P = .047). Adjustment for diagnosis and severity mix reduced this difference and its significance (P = .108). No other significant differences in outcomes were found. Patients who were more anxious (P = .000) or depressed (P = .017) at admission tended to more often accept acupuncture when offered. Conclusion. Acupuncture is accepted by a majority of hospitalized acute care patients. However, it did not reduce LOS in this already short-stay population.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 383  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Miscellaneous
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 924  
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Author Pastore, L. M.; Williams, C. D.; Jenkins, J.; Patrie, J. T. url  openurl
  Title True and Sham Acupuncture Produced Similar Frequency of Ovulation and Improved LH to FSH Ratios in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; Women's Health  
  Abstract Context: Acupuncture may represent a nonpharmaceutical treatment for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), based on four studies. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether true, as compared with sham, acupuncture normalizes pituitary gonadotropin hormones and increases ovulatory frequency in women with PCOS. Design: This was a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial (5 month protocol). Setting: The study was conducted in central Virginia. Participants: Eighty-four reproductive-aged women completed the intervention. Eligibility required a PCOS diagnosis and no hormonal intervention 60 d before enrollment. Interventions: Intervention included 12 sessions of true or sham acupuncture (Park sham device) for 8 wk. Main Outcome Measures: Serum LH and FSH at baseline, after intervention, and 3 months later were measured. Ovulation was measured with weekly urine or blood samples. Results: Both arms demonstrated a similar mean ovulation rate over the 5 months (0.37/month among n = 40 true acupuncture and 0.40/month among n = 44 sham participants, P = 0.6), similar LH to FSH ratio improvement (-0.5 and -0.8 true and sham, respectively, P < 0.04 after intervention vs. baseline) and a similar decline in LH over the 5-month protocol (P < 0.05). Neither arm experienced a change in FSH. There were seven pregnancies (no difference by intervention, P = 0.7). Lower fasting insulin and free testosterone were highly correlated with a higher ovulation rate within the true acupuncture group only (P = 0.03), controlling for prestudy menstrual frequency and body mass index. Conclusion: We were unable to discern a difference between the true and sham acupuncture protocols for these women with PCOS, and both groups had a similar improvement in their LH/FSH ratio.  
  Address Departments of Obstetrics/Gynecology (L.M.P.), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (J.J.), and Public Health Sciences (J.T.P.), University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908; Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia (C.D.W.), C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 96  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 938  
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