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Author Baker, T.E.; Chang, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use of auricular acupuncture in opioid use disorder: A systematic literature review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The American Journal on Addictions Abbreviated Journal Am J Addict  
  Volume 25 Issue 8 Pages 592-602  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic disease with significant personal, societal, and public health consequences. Even for the minority who receive the most effective evidence-based treatments, morbidity, and mortality remain significant. These facts, along with the recovery movement calling for individualized, holistic, culturally sensitive care, have led to the exploration of adjunctive interventions including acupuncture. Despite hundreds of international trials, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding its efficacy in OUD due in large part to methodological issues of trials to date. In response to these issues, the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) developed an operationalized manual auricular acupuncture protocol that has since become the most widely used in the US. This systematic review is the first to focus explicitly on randomized trials utilizing the NADA protocol as a complementary intervention to address OUD. METHODS: The methods utilized to identify studies for inclusion are based on a 2009 protocol developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. RESULTS: Four trials met inclusion criteria. Despite methodological issues, results indicate that while the NADA protocol may not be effective in reducing acute opiate craving or withdrawal, it may be effectively utilized as an adjunctive treatment to increase treatment retention and decrease methadone detoxification and maintenance dosages in OUD. CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Incorporation of the NADA protocol into existing evidence-based treatment approaches may facilitate recovery and, through its impact on treatment retention and completion, indirectly impact morbidity, and mortality in individuals with OUD. Given the limitations of the current review, conclusions are tentative and directions for future research are discussed. (Am J Addict 2016;25:592-602).  
  Address Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts  
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  Notes PMID:28051842 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2178  
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Author Salar, G.; Job, I.; Mingrino, S.; Bosio, A.; Trabucchi, M. openurl 
  Title Effect of transcutaneous electrotherapy on CSF beta-endorphin content in patients without pain problems Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 169-172  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract To test the hypothesis of opiate-like peptide release after transcutaneous electrotherapy we measured beta-endorphin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content in 13 patients without pain problems. The results indicate a time dependent increase of CSF beta-endorphin in the group of patients studied. This fact suggests that the analgesic properties of the treatment may be ascribed to an involvement of the endogenous opiates system, independently from the basal clinical conditions of the patients.  
  Address  
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  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Pain Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 10 Condition 2
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  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; eng Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1639  
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Author Lin, C.F.; Liao, J.M.; Tsai, S.J.; Chiang, P.Y.; Ting, H.; Tang, C.Y.; Lou, K.L.; Hsieh, L.C.; Wang, D.W.; Lin, T.B. openurl 
  Title Depressor effect on blood pressure and flow elicited by electroacupuncture in normal subjects Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Auton Neurosci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 107 Issue 1 Pages 60-64  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract To clarify the effect of electroacupuncture (Ea) on the activity of the cardiovascular system in normal individuals, hemodynamic parameters including arterial blood pressure (BP), finger blood flow (FBF) and heart rate (HR) as well as paravertebral temperature (PVT) were non-invasively recorded under Ea stimulation. Surface stimulation electrode was placed on the Hoku point (Li-4). Square wave pulses (0.05 ms) were applied from a stimulator with a stimulation frequency of 2 Hz (3 min). The stimulation intensity was five times of sensory threshold. BP and FBF were decreased (68.5+/-6.0%, P<0.01 and 96.8+/-1.1%, P<0.01 of control, respectively, n=7) while HR and PVT were increased significantly (115.0+/-5.1 of control, P<0.05 and 0.054+/-0.004 degree C, P<0.01, respectively, n=7) during Ea treatment. The results suggested an inhibition in sympathetic outflow, which induced vasodilatation of systemic arteriole and decrease in BP and FBF were elicited by Ea stimulation.  
  Address  
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  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; School of Physical Therapy, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. tblin@csmu.edu.tw; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12927228 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1652  
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Author Hubscher, M.; Vogt, L.; Bernhorster, M.; Rosenhagen, A.; Banzer, W. openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture on symptoms and muscle function in delayed-onset muscle soreness Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication J Altern Complement Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1011-6 LID - 10.1089/acm.  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study was done to investigate the effects of a standardized acupuncture treatment on symptoms and muscle function in exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled, observer and subject-blinded trial was undertaken. Twenty-two (22) healthy subjects (22-30 years; 10 males and 12 females) were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: real acupuncture (deep needling at classic acupuncture points and tender points; n = 7), sham-acupuncture (superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; n = 8), and control (no needling; n = 7). DOMS of the nondominant elbow-flexors was experimentally induced through eccentric contractions until exhaustion. The outcome measures were pain perception (visual analogue scale; VAS; range: 0-10 cm), mechanical pain threshold (MPT; pressure algometer), and maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF; force transducer). Treatment was applied immediately, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS induction. Measurements of MPT and MIVF were made prior to DOMS induction as well as before and after every treatment session. VAS data were acquired after DOMS induction as well as pre- and post-treatment. Final pain, MPT, and MIVF measurements were performed 72 hours after DOMS induction. RESULTS: Following nonparametric testing, there were no significant differences between groups in outcome measures at baseline. After 72 hours, pain perception (VAS) was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared to the sham acupuncture and control subjects. However, the mean MPT and MIVF scores were not significantly different between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although acupuncture seemed to have no effects on mechanical pain threshold and muscle function, it proved to reduce perceived pain arising from exercise-induced muscle soreness.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 14 Condition 8
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/21/2015; Date Modified: 5/21/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. m.huebscher@sport.uni-frankfurt.de; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=18990049 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1675  
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Author Chen, H.; Fu, J. openurl 
  Title Special Topic Study Therapeutic Effect Observation on Warm Needling for Keloidal Acne Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 145-148  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of warm needling therapy for keloidal acne. Methods: The 66 cases with keloidal acne were randomly allocated into a treatment group and a control group, 36 in the treatment group and 30 in the control group. The cases in the treatment group were treated with warm needling therapy upon qi arrival, whereas those in the control group were treated with acupuncture alone. Then the skin lesion, inflammation and improvement of the constitution were compared before and after treatment. The clinical efficacies in the two groups were also compared. Results: The skin lesion, inflammation and constitutional improvement in the treatment group were superior to the control group (P<0.05). The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.05), coupled with a lower relapse rate. Conclusion: Warm needling can result in a fast effect and lower rate of relapses for keloidal acne without toxic or adverse reactions. Additionally, in can also strengthen the patient's constitution.  
  Address  
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  Time in Treatment Condition
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  Notes Date of Input: 4/2/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; 1, Fu Jieying 1 Xiamen City Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fujian 361009, P. R. China 2 School of Acupuncture and Tuina, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong 510405, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1723  
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Author Zhu, B.; Shan, Y. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on Tourette Syndrome Treated by Different Acupuncture Methods Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 233-235  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Objective: To approach a better solution for enhancing the therapeutic results of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, by observing the clinical results of combined scalp with body acupuncture and mono-body acupuncture. Methods: Fifty-seven patients were randomized into a treatment group (31 cases) and a control group (26 cases). The patients in the treatment group all received combined scalp-body acupuncture treatment, while the patients in the control group were given mono-body acupuncture treatment, for 1 month as a treatment session. At the end of the third treatment session, the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) would be compared between pre- and post-treatment. Results: In the treatment group, 2 patients were clinically cured, 4 showed markedly effective, 18 "showed effective, and 7 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 77.4%. In the control group, 0 were clinically cured, 3 showed markedly effective, 9 showed effective, 14 failed, making a total therapeutic rate of 46.2%. There was a significant difference between the two total therapeutic rates (P<0.05). Conclusion: The combination of scalp and body acupuncture had a better therapeutic result than the mono-body acupuncture therapy in the treatment of Tourette syndrome  
  Address  
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  Notes Date of Input: 3/19/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200071, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1737  
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Author Qi, L.; Tang, Y.; You, Y.; Qin, F.; Zhai, L.; Peng, H.; Nie, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparing the Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture with Different Grades of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry : International Journal of Experimental Cellular Physiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Cell Physiol Biochem  
  Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 2331-2340  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The electroacupuncture (EA) with different number of points significantly affected its efficacy on knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and the severity of KOA also influenced its response to treatments. Hence, we prospectively compared the clinical efficacy of EA on KOA with different severities. METHODS: A total of 132 KOA patients recruited from 181st Central Hospital of The Chinese People's Liberation Army between March 2014 and March 2015 were classified into 4 KOA stages according to Kellgren Lawrence grading scale. They were allocated into three treatment groups, including two-point group, four-point group and six-point group. Patients in the six-point group received treatment at six-points including ST34, SP10, SP9, ST36, ST35 and EX-LE4. Patients in the four-point group received treatment at ST34, SP10, ST35 and EX-LE5, while patients in the two-point group received treatment at ST35 and EX-LE4. Visual Analog Scale (VAS), McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and self-assessment questionnaire of patients were assessed after treatment. RESULTS: Three kinds of EA treatments all have significant clinical effects on KOA patients with down-regulated scores of VAS and WOMAC. Regarding post-treatment efficacy, the six point group exhibited lower VAS score and higher WOMAC score compared with the other two groups. For patients with different KOA grades, patients with higher KOA grades were associated with lower grade of treatment efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with KOA, especially those with lower KOA stages, could gain beneficial efficacies from EA treatments with two, four and six points, respectively.  
  Address Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, 181st Central Hospital of The Chinese People's Liberation Army, Guilin, Guangxi, China  
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  Notes PMID:27832623 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2113  
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Author Shim, J.-W.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kim, S.-S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Electroacupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 3485875  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Purpose. This study aims to verify the effects of electroacupuncture treatment on osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, AMED, CNKI, and five Korean databases were searched by predefined search strategies to screen eligible randomized controlled studies meeting established criteria. Any risk of bias in the included studies was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan version 5.3 software. Results. Thirty-one randomized controlled studies of 3,187 participants were included in this systematic review. Meta-analysis was conducted with eight studies including a total of 1,220 participants. The electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement in pain due to knee osteoarthritis than the control group (SMD -1.86, 95% CI -2.33 to -1.39, I2 75%) and in total WOMAC score than the control group (SMD -1.34, CI 95% -1.85 to -0.83, I2 73%). Compared to the control group, the electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement on the quality of life scale. Conclusion. Electroacupuncture treatment can relieve the pain of osteoarthritis of the knees and improve comprehensive aspects of knee osteoarthritis and the quality of life of patients with knee osteoarthritis.  
  Address Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
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  Notes PMID:27818699; PMCID:PMC5081971 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2115  
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Author Meissner, K.; Schweizer-Arau, A.; Limmer, A.; Preibisch, C.; Popovici, R.M.; Lange, I.; de Oriol, B.; Beissner, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Psychotherapy With Somatosensory Stimulation for Endometriosis-Associated Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Obstetrics and Gynecology Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 128 Issue 5 Pages 1134-1142  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation is effective for the treatment of pain and quality of life in patients with endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: Patients with a history of endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain were randomized to either psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation (ie, different techniques of acupuncture point stimulation) or wait-list control for 3 months, after which all patients were treated. The primary outcome was brain connectivity assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Prespecified secondary outcomes included pain on 11-point numeric rating scales (maximal and average global pain, pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dyspareunia) and physical and mental quality of life. A sample size of 30 per group was planned to compare outcomes in the treatment group and the wait-list control group. RESULTS: From March 2010 through March 2012, 67 women (mean age 35.6 years) were randomly allocated to intervention (n=35) or wait-list control (n=32). In comparison with wait-list controls, treated patients showed improvements after 3 months in maximal global pain (mean group difference -2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] -3.4 to -0.8; P=.002), average global pain (-2.5, 95% CI -3.5 to -1.4; P<.001), pelvic pain (-1.4, 95% CI -2.7 to -0.1; P=.036), dyschezia (-3.5, 95% CI -5.8 to -1.3; P=.003), physical quality of life (3.8, 95% CI 0.5-7.1, P=.026), and mental quality of life (5.9, 95% CI 0.6-11.3; P=.031); dyspareunia improved nonsignificantly (-1.8, 95% CI -4.4 to 0.7; P=.150). Improvements in the intervention group remained stable at 6 and 24 months, and control patients showed comparable symptom relief after delayed intervention. CONCLUSION: Psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation reduced global pain, pelvic pain, and dyschezia and improved quality of life in patients with endometriosis. After 6 and 24 months, when all patients were treated, both groups showed stable improvements. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01321840.  
  Address Institute of Medical Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, and the Departments of Neuroradiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Clinic for Neurology, Technische Universitat Munchen, Munich, Practice for Psychotherapeutic Medicine, Diessen, the Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Fertility Disorders, Heidelberg University Women's Hospital, Heidelberg, and Somatosensory and Autonomic Therapy Research, Institute for Neuroradiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany  
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  Notes PMID:27741200 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2132  
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Author Qin, Z.; Wu, J.; Tian, J.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Network Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Acupuncture, Alpha-blockers and Antibiotics on Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 35737  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Alpha-blockers and antibiotics are most commonly used to treat chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) in clinical practice. Currently, increasing evidence also suggests acupuncture as an effective strategy. This network meta-analysis intended to assess the comparative efficacy and safety of acupuncture, alpha-blockers and antibiotics for CP/CPPS. Twelve trials involving 1203 participants were included. Based on decreases in the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, a network meta-analysis indicated that electro-acupuncture (standard mean difference [SMD]: 4.29; 95% credible interval [CrI], 1.96-6.65), acupuncture (SMD: 3.69; 95% CrI, 0.27-7.17), alpha-blockers (SMD: 1.85; 95% CrI, 1.07-2.64), antibiotics (SMD: 2.66; 95% CrI, 1.57-3.76), and dual therapy (SMD: 3.20; 95% CrI, 1.95-4.42) are superior to placebo in decreasing this score. Additionally, electro-acupuncture (SMD: 2.44; 95% CrI, 0.08-4.83) and dual therapy (SMD: 1.35; 95% CrI, 0.07-2.62) were more effective than alpha-blockers in decreasing the total NIH-CPSI total score. Other network meta-analyses did not show significant differences between interventions other placebo. The incidence of adverse events of acupuncture was relatively rare (5.4%) compared with placebo (17.1%), alpha-blockers (24.9%), antibiotics (31%) and dual therapy (48.6%). Overall, rank tests and safety analyses indicate that electro-acupuncture/acupuncture may be recommended for the treatment of CP/CPPS.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China  
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  Notes PMID:27759111; PMCID:PMC5069632 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2136  
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Author Yu, J.; Ye, Y.; Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Peng, W.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Tourette Syndrome: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 1834646  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that affects both children and adults. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) using acupuncture to treat TS written in English or Chinese without restrictions on publication status. Study selection, data extraction, and assessment of study quality were conducted independently by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed using Review Manager (RevMan) 5.3 software from the Cochrane Collaboration. Data were combined with the fixed-effect model based on a heterogeneity test. Results were presented as risk ratios for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data. This review included 7 RCTs with a total of 564 participants. The combined results showed that acupuncture may have better short-term effect than Western medicine for TS and that acupuncture may be an effective adjuvant therapy in improving the effect of Western medicine on TS, but the evidence is limited because of existing biases. Rigorous high-quality RCTs are needed to verify these findings.  
  Address Acupuncture Department, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5, Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
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  Notes PMID:27725839; PMCID:PMC5048029 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2142  
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Author Zheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Lan, Y.; Qu, S.; Tang, C.; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Decreases Blood Pressure Related to Hypothalamus Functional Connectivity with Frontal Lobe, Cerebellum, and Insula: A Study of Instantaneous and Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Essential Hypertension Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2016 Issue Pages 6908710  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract The therapeutic effects of acupuncture in decreasing blood pressure are ambiguous and underlying acupuncture in hypertension treatment has not been investigated. Our objective was to observe the change of quality of life and compare the differences in brain functional connectivity by investigating instantaneous and short-term acupuncture treatment in essential hypertension patients. A total of 30 patients were randomly divided into the LR3 group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting-state fMRI among preacupuncture, postinstantaneous, and short-term acupuncture treatment in two groups. Hypothalamus was selected as the seed point to analyze the changes in connectivity. We found three kinds of results: (1) There was statistical difference in systolic blood pressure in LR3 group after the short-term treatment and before acupuncture. (2) Compared with sham acupoint, acupuncture at LR3 instantaneous effects in the functional connectivity with seed points was more concentrated in the frontal lobe. (3) Compared with instantaneous effects, acupuncture LR3 short-term effects in the functional connectivity with seed points had more regions in frontal lobe, cerebellum, and insula. These brain areas constituted a neural network structure with specific functions that could explain the mechanism of therapy in hypertension patients by LR3 acupoint.  
  Address School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510515, China  
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  Notes PMID:27688791; PMCID:PMC5027048 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2147  
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Author Guo, T.; Chen, X.; Wu, X.; Shan, E.; Jin, Y.; Tai, X.; Liu, Z.; Zhu, B.; Yuan, K.; Chen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for osteoporosis: a systematic review protocol Type of Study
  Year 2016 Publication Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Syst Rev  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages 161  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a global high prevalence of chronic metabolic disease with serious disability-adjusted life years losing. Acupuncture is used to treat osteoporosis broadly in China and other countries although the evidence on effectiveness cannot give a certain answer. The aim of this systematic review protocol is to appraise the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for osteoporosis. METHODS: A literature search of randomized controlled trials focusing on acupuncture for osteoporosis will be performed in the databases of Medline, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EBASE, Springer, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wan fang, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and other possible resources with a valid search strategy. Outcomes of pain, bone mineral density, fracture, mortality, improvement proportion, biochemical indicators, quality of life, adverse event, and other valid will be extracted and merged for quantitative analysis using Review Manager software (V.5.3.5) or descriptive analysis correspondingly. DISCUSSION: This is the first systematic review to estimate the effect of acupuncture on osteoporosis, and the result may provide evidence to clinical doctor. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42016037829.  
  Address School of Acupuncture-Tuina and Rehabilitation, Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunming, Yunnan Province, China. 0871czk@sina.com  
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  Notes PMID:27653783; PMCID:PMC5031268 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2152  
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Author Cheng, K.; Law, A.; Guo, M.; Wieland, L.S.; Shen, X.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for acute hordeolum Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages Cd011075  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or comparing acupuncture plus another treatment versus another treatment alone. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures used by Cochrane. MAIN RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs with a total of 531 participants from China. The mean age of the participants ranged from 18 to 28 years. Four RCTs included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum with a duration of less than seven days; one RCT included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum without specifying the duration; and one RCT included participants with recurrent acute hordeolum with a mean duration of 24 days. About 55% (291/531) of participants were women. Three RCTs included participants with either external or internal hordeolum; one RCT included participants with only external hordeolum; and two RCTs did not specify the type of hordeolum. Follow-up was no more than seven days after treatment in all included RCTs; no data were available for long-term outcomes. Overall, the certainty of the evidence for all outcomes was low to very low, and we judged all RCTs to be at high or unclear risk of bias.Three RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional treatments. We did not pool the data from these RCTs because the conventional treatments were not similar among trials. Two trials showed that resolution of acute hordeolum was more likely in the acupuncture group when compared with topical antibiotics (1 RCT; 32 participants; risk ratio (RR) 3.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34 to 9.70; low-certainty of evidence) or oral antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 120 participants; RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.78; low-certainty of evidence). In the third trial, little or no difference in resolution of hordeolum was observed when acupuncture was compared with topical antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 109 participants; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.04; low-certainty of evidence). One RCT mentioned adverse outcomes, stating that there was no adverse event associated with acupuncture.Three RCTs compared acupuncture plus conventional treatments (two RCTs used topical antibiotics and warm compresses, one RCT used topical antibiotics only) versus the conventional treatments alone. One of the three RCTs, with very low-certainty evidence, did not report the resolution of acute hordeolum; however, it reported that acute hordeolum relief might be higher when acupuncture was combined with conventional treatments than with conventional treatments alone group (60 participants; RR 1.80; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.23). Pooled analysis of the remaining two RCTs, with low-certainty evidence, estimated resolution of acute hordeolum was slightly higher in the combined treatment group compared with the conventional treatment alone group at 7-day follow-up (210 participants; RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.23; I2 = 0%). None of the three RCTs reported adverse outcomes. Among the included RCTs, four participants, two from the acupuncture plus conventional treatments group and two from the conventional treatments alone group, withdrew due to exacerbation of symptoms. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture with or without conventional treatments may provide short-term benefits for treating acute hordeolum when compared with conventional treatments alone. The certainty of the evidence was low to very low mainly due to small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of masking of the outcome assessors, inadequate or unclear randomization method, and a high or unreported number of dropouts. All RCTs were conducted in China, which may limit their generalizability to non-Chinese populations.Because no RCTs included a valid sham acupuncture control, we cannot rule out a potential expectation/placebo effect associated with acupuncture. As resolution is based on clinical observation, the outcome could be influenced by the observer's knowledge of the assigned treatment. Adverse effects of acupuncture were reported sparsely in the included RCTs, and, when reported, were rare. RCTs with better methodology, longer follow-up, and which are conducted among other populations are warranted to provide more general evidence regarding the benefit of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China  
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  Notes PMID:28181687; PMCID:PMC5378315 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2194  
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Author King, H.C.; Spence, D.L.; Hickey, A.H.; Sargent, P.; Elesh, R.; Connelly, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Auricular acupuncture for sleep disturbance in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder: a feasibility study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Military Medicine Abbreviated Journal Milit Med  
  Volume 180 Issue 5 Pages 582-590  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of an auricular acupuncture (AA) insomnia regimen among Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and sleep disturbance. Secondarily, this study examined the effect of an AA insomnia regimen on objective sleep times by wrist actigraphy, subjective sleep times by sleep diary, and sleep quality ratings utilizing the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. Veterans (n = 30) were randomized to receive a 3-week AA insomnia regimen. Veterans receiving the AA insomnia regimen reported it as a more acceptable treatment for sleep disturbance than subjects in the control group (AA group median = 5 vs. control group median = 3, p = 0.004). Significant differences between groups were found on the sleep quality and daytime dysfunction components of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (p = 0.003, p = 0.004). No other significant differences between groups were found for objective and subjective sleep measures. These results suggest that an AA insomnia regimen may improve sleep quality and daytime dysfunction among veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Future, large-scale, prospective clinical trials are needed to examine AA effects on sleep.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 109732139. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20170104. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Military/Uniformed Services. NLM UID: 2984771R. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109732139 Serial 2309  
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Author Nielsen, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Prevention of Tension-Type Headache (2016) Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Explore (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Explore (NY)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, et al. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache.Cochrane Database Syst Rev2016, Issue 48. Art No.: CD007587. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007587.pub2. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is often used for prevention of tension-type headache but its effectiveness is still controversial. This is an update of our Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2009 of The Cochrane Library. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether acupuncture is (a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; (b) more effective than “sham” (placebo) acupuncture; and (c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and AMED to 19 January 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to 10 February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least eight weeks, which compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another prophylactic intervention in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results; and assessed study risk of bias and the quality of the acupuncture intervention. The main efficacy outcome measure was response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency) after completion of treatment (three to four months after randomization). To assess safety/acceptability we extracted the number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and the number of participants reporting adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials (11 included in the previous version and one newly identified) with 2349 participants (median = 56, range: 10-1265) met the inclusion criteria. Acupuncture was compared with routine care or treatment of acute headaches only in two large trials (1265 and 207 participants), but they had quite different baseline headache frequency and management in the control groups. Neither trial was blinded but trial quality was otherwise high (low risk of bias). While effect size estimates of the two trials differed considerably, the proportion of participants experiencing at least 50% reduction of headache frequency was much higher in groups receiving acupuncture than in control groups (moderate quality evidence; trial 1: 302/629 (48%) versus 121/636 (19%); risk ratio (RR) = 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1-3.0; trial 2: 60/132 (45%) versus 3/75 (4%); RR = 11; 95% CI: 3.7-35). Long-term effects (beyond four months) were not investigated. Acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture in seven trials of moderate- to high-quality (low risk of bias); five large studies provided data for one or more meta-analyses. Among participants receiving acupuncture, 205 of 391 (51%) had at least 50% reduction of headache frequency compared to 133 of 312 (43%) in the sham group after treatment (RR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.09-1.5; four trials; moderate quality evidence). Results six months after randomization were similar. Withdrawals were low: 1 of 420 participants receiving acupuncture dropped out due to adverse effects and 0 of 343 receiving sham (six trials; low quality evidence). Three trials reported the number of participants reporting adverse effects: 29 of 174 (17%) with acupuncture versus 12 of 103 with sham (12%; odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.60-2.7; low quality evidence). Acupuncture was compared with physiotherapy, massage, or exercise in four trials of low to moderate quality (high risk of bias); study findings were inadequately reported. No trial found a significant superiority of acupuncture and for some outcomes the results slightly favored the comparison therapy. None of these trials reported the number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects or the number of participants reporting adverse effects. Overall, the quality of the evidence assessed using GRADE was moderate or low, downgraded mainly due to a lack of blinding and variable effect sizes. AUTHORS CONCLUSIONS: The available results suggest that acupuncture is effective for treating frequent episodic or chronic tension-type headaches, but further trials-particularly comparing acupuncture with other treatment options-are needed.  
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  Notes PMID:28392178 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2204  
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Author Ee, C.; French, S.D.; Xue, C.C.; Pirotta, M.; Teede, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes: clinical evidence update and its relevance to decision making Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes. This article synthesizes the best available evidence for when women are considering whether acupuncture might be useful for menopausal hot flashes. METHODS: We searched electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. RESULTS: The overall evidence demonstrates that acupuncture is effective when compared with no treatment, but not efficacious compared with sham. Methodological challenges such as the complex nature of acupuncture treatment, the physiological effects from sham, and the significant efficacy of placebo therapy generally in treating hot flashes all impact on these considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture improves menopausal hot flashes compared with no treatment; however, not compared with sham acupuncture. This is also consistent with the evidence that a range of placebo interventions improve menopausal symptoms. As clinicians play a vital role in assisting evidence-informed decisions, we need to ensure women understand the evidence and can integrate it with personal preferences. Some women may choose acupuncture for hot flashes, a potentially disabling condition without long-term adverse health consequences. Yet, women should do so understanding the evidence, and its strengths and weaknesses, around both effective medical therapies and acupuncture. Likewise, cost to the individual and the health system needs to be considered in the context of value-based health care.  
  Address 1National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia 2Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 3School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada 4School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Australia 5Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia  
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  Notes PMID:28350757 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2218  
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Author Salazar, A.P. de S.; Stein, C.; Marchese, R.R.; Plentz, R.D.M.; Pagnussat, A.D.S. url  openurl
  Title Electric Stimulation for Pain Relief in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Pain Physician Abbreviated Journal Pain Physician  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 15-25  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome whose primary symptoms include chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The treatment of patients with FM aims to provide symptomatic relief and improvement in physical capacities to perform daily tasks and quality of life. Invasive or non-invasive electric stimulation (ES) is used for pain relief in patients with FM. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of treatment with ES, combined or not combined with other types of therapy, for pain relief in patients with FM. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: Electronic search was conducted on databases (from the inception to April 2016): MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane CENTRAL), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). METHODS: Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies based on the inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of ES combined or not with other types of treatment for pain relief in patients with FM (according to the American College of Rheumatology), regardless of the ES dosages. The primary outcome was pain, assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes extracted were quality of life, assessed by short form-36 health survey (SF- 36), and fatigue, assessed by VAS. RESULTS: Nine studies were included, with 301 patients. The meta-analysis for pain showed positive effect of ES treatment versus control [-1.24 (95% CI: -2.39 to -0.08; I(2): 87%, P = 0.04) n = 8 RCTs]. The sensitivity analysis for pain showed significant results for invasive ES, combined or not with other types of therapy [-0.94 (95% CI, -1.50 to -0.38; I(2) 0%, P = 0.001) n = 3 RCTs]. No significant improvement was found regarding quality of life [-3.48 (95% CI: -12.58 to 5.62; I(2): 0%, P = 0.45), n = 2 RCTs] or fatigue [-0.57 (95% CI, -1.25 to 0.11; I(2) 34%, P = 0.100; n = 4 RCTs]. LIMITATIONS: This systematic review included a small number of studies and reduced number of participants in each study. Furthermore, most of the studies showed some biases and lack of methodological quality. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that there is low-quality evidence for the effectiveness of ES for pain relief in patients with FM. However, moderate-quality evidence for the effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA), combined or not combined with other types of treatment, was found for pain relief. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: PROSPERO under the identification CRD42015025323Key words: Electric stimulation, electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, pain, fibromyalgia, review, physical therapy, rehabilitation.  
  Address 1Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Reabilitacao, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Bolsista de Desenvolvimento Tecnico e Industrial da Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Movement Analysis and Neurological Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil  
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  Notes PMID:28158150 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2222  
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Author Zhang, W.; Ma, L.; Bauer, B.A.; Liu, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0174586  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract PURPOSE: This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to assess the therapeutic and adverse effects of acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and the Wanfang Database. Parallel-group RCTs of acupuncture for men with symptomatic BPH were included. Data from the included trials were extracted by two independent reviewers and were analyzed with The Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager software (RevMan 5.3.5) after risk of bias judgments. The primary outcome measure of this review was a change in urological symptoms. RESULTS: Eight RCTs, which involved 661 men with BPH, were included. Follow-up varied from 4 weeks to 18 months. Pooling of the data from three trials that compared acupuncture with sham-acupuncture revealed that in the short term (4-6 weeks), acupuncture can significantly improve IPSS (MD -1.90, 95% CI -3.58 to -0.21). A sensitivity analysis of the short-term endpoint showed the same result (MD -3.01, 95% CI -5.19 to -0.84) with a borderline minimal clinical important difference (MCID). Qmax of the short-term endpoint indicated statistically positive beneficial effects of acupuncture (MD -1.78, 95%CI -3.43, -0.14). A meta-analysis after medium-term follow-up (12-18 weeks) indicated no significant effect on IPSS when the data from two trials were combined (MD -2.04, 95% CI -4.19, 0.10). CONCLUSION: Statistically significant changes were observed in favor of acupuncture in moderate to severe BPH with respect to short-term follow-up endpoints. The clinical significance of these changes needs to be tested by further studies with rigorous designs and longer follow-up times. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO CRD42014013645.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China  
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  Notes PMID:28376120; PMCID:PMC5380320 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2223  
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Author Fogarty, S.; Stojanovska, L.; Harris, D.; Zaslawski, C.; Mathai, M.L.; McAinch, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A randomised cross-over pilot study investigating the use of acupuncture to promote weight loss and mental health in overweight and obese individuals participating in a weight loss program Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eating & Weight Disorders Abbreviated Journal Eat Weight Disord  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 379-387  
  Keywords (up)  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture is widely used as an alternative modality for weight loss. Despite its increasing use, few acupuncture studies have evaluated the effect of a weight loss program on the mental health of obese/overweight participants and none have looked at the effect on those with eating, weight and shape concerns.Objectives: To investigate the feasibility of conducting an acupuncture study involving overweight or obese individuals undertaking a weight loss program with particular reference to those with eating concerns.Methods: Thirty-five overweight/obese males and females participated in a single-blinded randomised cross-over study. The two intervention phases were: (1) nutritional counselling plus Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) acupuncture and (2) nutritional counselling plus sham acupuncture.Outcome Measures: This study evaluates the feasibility and practicalities of the study including recruitment, retention, adverse events, effectiveness for defining eating and weight concerns, study design and statistics for power calculations.Conclusion: The outcome measures, the recruitment of those with eating and weight concerns and the acceptability of the intervention demonstrate a larger trial investigating the use of acupuncture for weight loss in those who have elevated eating and weight concerns is feasible.  
  Address  
  Publisher Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
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  Notes Accession Number: 109638538. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150923. Revision Date: 20160603. Publication Type: journal article; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Blind Peer Reviewed; Continental Europe; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Nutrition. NLM UID: 9707113. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 109638538 Serial 2306  
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