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Author Acupuncture Research Resource Centre url  openurl
  Title Sports Injuries and Acupuncture: The Evidence for Effectiveness Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit Acupun  
  Volume 11 A2 Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Wounds and Injuries; Sports Medicine; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sports Medicine
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 3  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, C. B.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, J. C.; Fossion, J. P.; Sant'Ana, A. url  openurl
  Title A clinical pilot study comparing traditional acupuncture to combined acupuncture for treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 29-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Headache Disorders; Trigeminal Neuralgia; Nervous System Diseases; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Bell Palsy; Pilot Study; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Fossion Auricular Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract Traditional acupuncture (TA) and ear acupuncture (EA) are used for treatment of headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain. The purpose of this study is to develop effective treatment using combined acupuncture (CA) which consists of TA and EA and to set clinical protocols for future trials. Participants were divided into TA (n = 15) control and CA (n = 34) experimental groups. Obligatory points among Korean Five Element Acupuncture and optional individual points along with symptom points were used in the TA group. The CA group was exposed to ear points of Fossion and TA. Acupuncture treatment consisted of six mandatory sessions per patient over 3 weeks and extended to 12 sessions. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. We compared TA to CA and researched their relevant publications. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p = 0.968) which showed pain-alleviating tendency. Pain alleviation was significantly different after the fifth and sixth sessions (p = 0.021, p = 0.025), with headache being the most significantly relieved (F = 4.399, p = 0.018) among the diseases. When assessing pain intensity, both the Headache Impact Test and the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale should be adopted for headache and the fractal electroencephalography method be used in pain diseases. In the future, studies should consist of TA, EA, and CA groups; each group having 20 patients. Treatment number should to be no less than 10 sessions. Korean Five Element Acupuncture should be a compulsory inclusion along with individual points being optional inclusion in TA. EA could be selected from Nogier, Fossion and so forth. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment, whether TA or CA, showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain, but no significant difference was seen between groups. Prospective, well-controlled, and relevant protocols using multimodal strategies to define the role of TA, EA, and CA are needed.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, College of Oriental Medicine, Dongeui University, Busan, Korea. cbahn@deu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 6  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allais, G.; Romoli, M.; Rolando, S.; Airola, G.; Castagnoli Gabellari, I.; Allais, R.; Benedetto, C. url  openurl
  Title Ear acupuncture in the treatment of migraine attacks: a randomized trial on the efficacy of appropriate versus inappropriate acupoints Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal Neurol Sci  
  Volume 1/1/1970 Issue Pages S173-5  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Headache Disorders; Migraine; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Auricular Acupuncture; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Needle Contact Test; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Other Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ear acupuncture can be a useful mean for controlling migraine pain. It has been shown that a technique called the Needle Contact Test (NCT) can identify the most efficacious ear acupoints for reducing current migraine pain through just a few seconds of needle contact. The majority of the points were located on the antero-internal part of the antitragus (area M) on the same side of pain. The aim of this study was to verify the therapeutic value of area M and to compare it with an area of the ear (representation of the sciatic nerve, area S) which probably does not have a therapeutic effect on migraine attacks. We studied 94 females suffering from migraine without aura, diagnosed according to the ICHD-II criteria, during the attack. They were randomly subdivided into two groups: in group A, tender points located in area M, positive to NCT were inserted; in group B, the unsuitable area (S) was treated. Changes in pain intensity were measured using a VAS scale at various times of the study. During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of the VAS value in group A (Anova for repeated measures: p < 0.001), whereas no significance was observed in group B. VAS values were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after needle insertion. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.  
  Address Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Women's Headache Center, University of Turin, Via Ventimiglia 3, 10126 Turin, Italy. gb.allais@tiscali.it  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 94  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 19  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ambrosio, E. M.; Bloor, K.; MacPherson, H. url  openurl
  Title Costs and consequences of acupuncture as a treatment for chronic pain: a systematic review of economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 5 Pages 364-374  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Acupuncture; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The economic burden that chronic pain conditions impose on individuals and society is significant. Acupuncture appears to be a clinically effective treatment for some chronic pain conditions. Given the need for policy decisions to be informed by economic evaluations, the objective of this systematic review was to synthesise data from economic evaluations to determine whether acupuncture for the treatment of chronic pain conditions is good value for money. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using health and economics databases, with additional hand-searching. Economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials were eligible. RESULTS: Eight economic evaluations were included in this review, seven cost-utility analyses and one cost-effectiveness analysis. Conditions treated included low back pain, neck pain, dysmenorrhoea, migraine and headache, and osteoarthritis. From the seven cost-utility analyses, acupuncture was found to be clinically effective but cost more. The cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained ranged from 2527 pounds to 14,976 pounds per QALY, below the commonly quoted threshold used by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence of 20,000 pounds to 30,000 pounds. The one cost-effectiveness study indicated that there might be both clinical benefits and cost savings associated with acupuncture for migraine. There was heterogeneity across the eight trials in terms of professional who provided the acupuncture, style of acupuncture, and country of origin. CONCLUSION: The cost per QALY gained in all seven cost-utility studies was found to be below typical thresholds of willingness to pay. Acupuncture appears to be a cost-effective intervention for some chronic pain conditions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, Alcuin C Block, University of York, Heslington, York Y010 5DD, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 24  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andersen, D.; Lossl, K.; Nyboe Andersen, A.; Furbringer, J.; Bach, H.; Simonsen, J.; Larsen, E. C. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer: a randomized controlled trial of 635 patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Reproductive biomedicine online Abbreviated Journal Reprod Biomed Online  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 366-372  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; Embryo Transfer; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract This prospective, randomized, controlled and double-blinded trial studied whether acupuncture in relation to embryo transfer could increase the ongoing pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy. A total of 635 patients undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were included. In 314 patients, embryo transfer was accompanied by acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. In the control group, 321 patients received placebo acupuncture using a validated placebo needle. In the acupuncture group and the placebo group, the ongoing pregnancy rates were 27% (95% CI 22-32) and 32% (95% CI 27-37), respectively. Live birth rates were 25% (95% CI 20-30) in the acupuncture group and 30% (95% CI 25-30) in the placebo group. The differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that acupuncture administered in relation to embryo transfer has no effect on the outcome of IVF and ICSI.  
  Address The Fertility Clinics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 635  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Embryo Transfer
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 29  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andreescu, C.; Glick, R. M.; Emeremni, C. A.; Houck, P. R.; Mulsant, B. H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication The Journal of clinical psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 72 Issue 8 Pages 1129-1135  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder, Major; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Depression  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Over 50% of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) either do not tolerate or do not respond to antidepressant medications. Several preliminary studies have shown the benefits of acupuncture in the treatment of depression. We sought to determine whether a 2-point electroacupuncture protocol (verum acupuncture) would be beneficial for MDD, in comparison to needling at nonchannel scalp points with sham electrostimulation (control acupuncture). METHOD: Fifty-three subjects aged 18-80 years, recruited via advertisement or referral, were included in the primary analysis of our randomized controlled trial, which was conducted from March 2004 through May 2007 at UPMC Shadyside, Center for Complementary Medicine, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Inclusion criteria were mild or moderate MDD (according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders) and a score of 14 or higher on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Exclusion criteria included severe MDD, seizure disorder or risk for seizure disorder, psychosis, bipolar disorder, chronic MDD, treatment-resistent MDD, and history of substance abuse in the prior 6 months. Patients were randomized to receive twelve 30-minute sessions of verum versus control acupuncture over 6 to 8 weeks. The HDRS was the primary outcome measure. The UKU Side Effect Rating Scale was used to assess for adverse effects. RESULTS: Twenty-eight subjects were randomized to verum electroacupuncture and 25 to control acupuncture. The 2 groups did not differ with regard to gender, age, or baseline severity of depression. Both groups improved, with mean (SD) absolute HDRS score decreases of -6.6 (5.9) in the verum group and -7.6 (6.6) in the control group, corresponding to 37.5% and 41.3% relative decreases from baseline. There were no serious adverse events associated with either intervention, and endorsement of adverse effects was similar in the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to demonstrate a specific effect of electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture and control acupuncture were equally well tolerated, and both resulted in similar absolute and relative improvement in depressive symptoms as measured by the HDRS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00071110.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Center for Integrative Medicine, UPMC Shadyside, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 57  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder, Major
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 31  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asher, G. N.; Jonas, D. E.; Coeytaux, R. R.; Reilly, A. C.; Loh, Y. L.; Motsinger-Reif, A. A.; Winham, S. J. url  openurl
  Title Auriculotherapy for pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 10 Pages 1097-1108  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Auricular Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Side-effects of standard pain medications can limit their use. Therefore, nonpharmacologic pain relief techniques such as auriculotherapy may play an important role in pain management. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating auriculotherapy for pain management. DESIGN: MEDLINE,((R)) ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Library were searched through December 2008. Randomized trials comparing auriculotherapy to sham, placebo, or standard-of-care control were included that measured outcomes of pain or medication use and were published in English. Two (2) reviewers independently assessed trial eligibility, quality, and abstracted data to a standardized form. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated for studies using a pain score or analgesic requirement as a primary outcome. RESULTS: Seventeen (17) studies met inclusion criteria (8 perioperative, 4 acute, and 5 chronic pain). Auriculotherapy was superior to controls for studies evaluating pain intensity (SMD, 1.56 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 2.26]; 8 studies). For perioperative pain, auriculotherapy reduced analgesic use (SMD, 0.54 [95% CI: 0.30, 0.77]; 5 studies). For acute pain and chronic pain, auriculotherapy reduced pain intensity (SMD for acute pain, 1.35 [95% CI: 0.08, 2.64], 2 studies; SMD for chronic pain, 1.84 [95% CI: 0.60, 3.07], 5 studies). Removal of poor quality studies did not alter the conclusions. Significant heterogeneity existed among studies of acute and chronic pain, but not perioperative pain. CONCLUSIONS: Auriculotherapy may be effective for the treatment of a variety of types of pain, especially postoperative pain. However, a more accurate estimate of the effect will require further large, well-designed trials.  
  Address Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. gasher@med.unc.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 40  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Axelsson, A.; Andersson, S.; Gu, L. D. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the management of tinnitus: A placebo controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1994 Publication Abbreviated Journal Audiology  
  Volume 33 Issue Pages 351-360  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Sham TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tinnitus; Verum Acupoint Control; Ear Diseases; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract The present study was performed on 20 patients randomly selected from a large group with noise-induced tinnitus in order to investigate the effect of acupuncture on their tinnitus. The patients were divided into two groups. One group first received classical Chinese needle acupuncture for 5 weeks, and the other was given a placebo procedure; after a 2-week interval, the procedures were reversed. A single-blind cross-over design was used. Acupuncture was given by a Chinese otolaryngologist around the ear as well as at distal points on the extremities. Placebo consisted of mock electrical stimulation via surface electrodes connected to a Chinese electro-acupuncture stimulator which delivered a weak sound and a light flash at a frequency of 2 Hz but no current to the surface electrodes. The effect was evaluated by the use of visual analogue scales. No significant difference between acupuncture and placebo was found in annoyance, awareness or loudness of the tinnitus. Many patients indicated a preference for acupuncture due to unspecific effects such as improved sleep, decreased muscle tension and improved blood circulation. It is concluded that acupuncture has no specific alleviating effect on noise-induced tinnitus.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 47  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Balk, J.; Day, R.; Rosenzweig, M.; Beriwal, S. url  openurl
  Title Pilot, randomized, modified, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Soc.Integr.Oncol.  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4-11  
  Keywords Cancer-Related Fatigue; Neoplasms; Fatigue; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Cancer;  
  Abstract Cancer-related fatigue is a substantial problem for cancer patients and their caregivers, but no effective treatment exists. Acupuncture has been suggested to improve cancer-related fatigue, but no randomized clinical trials have been conducted. We hypothesized that true acupuncture, compared with sham acupuncture, would reduce cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients receiving external radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to determine effect size and feasibility. A modified, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. The subject, clinical staff, and assessor were blinded, but the acupuncturist was not. Subjects received acupuncture once to twice per week during the 6-week course of radiation therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks, which was 4 weeks after that last radiation session. Twenty-seven subjects enrolled, and 23 completed the last data collection. Both true and sham acupuncture groups had improved fatigue, fatigue distress, quality of life, and depression from baseline to 10 weeks, but the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The true acupuncture group improved 5.50 (SE, +/- 1.48) points on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Subscale (FACIT-F), whereas the sham acupuncture group improved by 3.73 (SE +/- 1.92) points. This difference was not statistically significant (p = .37). All subjects guessed that they were in the true acupuncture group. Our study was underpowered to find a statistically significant difference. To demonstrate a statistically significant improvement between true and sham acupuncture would require 75 subjects per group in a future study. Owing to poor recruitment, the feasibility of a larger trial using the same methodology is low. Despite being underpowered, it appears that subjects receiving true acupuncture may benefit more than subjects receiving sham acupuncture. In the discussion section, we review our experience with using a sham-needle controlled study  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Fatigue
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 54  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W.; zhu, G.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title A Randomized and Comparative Study on Vascular Dementia Treated by Needling Remaining at Head Points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 12-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 54  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 62  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Beal, M. W.; Nield-Anderson, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for symptom relief in HIV-positive adults: lessons learned from a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages 33-42  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; HIV Infections; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; HIV Infections  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Although acupuncture is used by many people with HIV disease as a complementary treatment to Western medicine, there is a lack of scientifically sound research on patient responses and outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting a larger study investigating the efficacy of acupuncture on symptom distress, psychological distress, and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals. DESIGN: This pilot study used a block randomization, single-blinded design. SETTING: Yale University General Clinical Research Center. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven HIV-positive participants. INTERVENTION: Patients were grouped by CD4 cell counts and received acupuncture treatments twice each week for 3 weeks. The experimental group received a protocol with 2 components: one tailored to the individual's symptoms and a second standardized component treatment designed to promote health and immune function. The control-needling group received a standardized acupuncture involving stimulation of acupuncture points identified as “clinically irrelevant” in treating the conditions under investigation (i.e., acupuncture points that have consistently not been cited as helpful for symptoms of relevant conditions or immune disorders). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The HIV-Symptom List was administered to gather data on symptom distress, the Brief Symptom Inventory was used to gather data on psychological distress, and the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection was administered to collect data on quality of life. RESULTS: Preliminary data from small numbers of participants showed trends toward improvement in symptoms and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: A follow-up pilot study will focus on the use of acupuncture to relieve gastrointestinal symptoms in people with HIV  
  Address Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Conn., USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition HIV Infections
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 63  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Berle, C. A.; Cobbin, D.; Smith, N.; Zaslawski, C. url  openurl
  Title A novel approach to evaluate traditional Chinese medicine treatment outcomes using pattern identification Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 357-367  
  Keywords AcuTrials; TCM Acupuncture Style; RCT; Hepatitis C; Liver Diseases; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Methodological Concerns; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a modern interpretation of Chinese medicine, developed in the 1950s. It differentiates biomedical diseases into patterns. Each pattern comprises symptom/signs that have their own unique treatment protocol. Most TCM research has used fixed formula treatments for Western-defined diseases with outcomes often measured using objective biomedical markers. More recently, a number of trials have attempted to accommodate TCM clinical practice within the framework of rigorous evidence-based medical research. The aim of this article is to describe a novel outcome measure based on TCM patterns that was used in a pilot study for people with hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS: Sixteen (16) participants with HCV were enrolled in a randomized, controlled pilot study and allocated to a treatment or control group. TCM pattern diagnosis was obtained at baseline and used to guide acupuncture treatment for the treatment group. Each individual's primary, secondary, and tertiary TCM patterns were identified, which involved the systematic evaluation of the participant's information against the TCM patterns and conversion of the pattern to a percentage. Baseline and postintervention percentages for the three TCM patterns for the two groups were compared to assess change. RESULTS: There was a significant mean percentage decrease in pattern expression at week 12 compared to baseline for the secondary and tertiary patterns of the treatment group (56.3% versus 47.5%; p = 0.045 and 48.1% versus 33.6%; p = 0.037, respectively). No significant change was found for the primary, secondary, or tertiary patterns for the control group or for the primary pattern associated with the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of TCM patterns in this study permitted statistical evaluation of TCM pattern change. Previously, TCM pattern identification had only been used as a basis for developing the treatment protocol in clinical trials. This is the first time it has been employed as a novel outcome measure.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Christine.Berle@uts.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 16  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hepatitis C
  Disease Category Liver Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 66  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjordal, J. M.; Johnson, M. I.; Lopes-Martins, R. A.; Bogen, B.; Chow, R.; Ljunggren, A. E. url  openurl
  Title Short-term efficacy of physical interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 51-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Laser Acupuncture; Magnets; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; Systematic Review; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; TENS; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Treatment efficacy of physical agents in osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) pain has been largely unknown, and this systematic review was aimed at assessing their short-term efficacies for pain relief. Aims and methods: Systematic review with meta-analysis of efficacy within 1-4 weeks and 5-12 weeks. RESULTS: 36 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 2434 patients where 1391 patients received active treatment. 33 trials satisfied three or more out of five methodological criteria (Jadad scale). The patient sample had a mean age of 65.1 years and mean baseline pain of 62.9 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Within 4 weeks of the commencement of treatment manual acupuncture, static magnets and ultrasound therapies did not offer statistically significant short-term pain relief over placebo. Pulsed electromagnetic fields offered a small reduction in pain of 6.9 mm [95% CI: 2.2 to 11.6] (n=487). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, including interferential currents), electro-acupuncture (EA) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) offered clinically relevant pain relieving effects of 18.8 mm [95% CI: 9.6 to 28.1] (n=414), 21.9 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 26.5] (n=73) and 17.7 mm[95% CI: 8.1 to 27.3] (n=343) on VAS respectively versus placebo control. In a subgroup analysis of trials with assumed optimal doses, short-term efficacy increased to 22.2 mm [95% CI: 18.1 to 26.3] for TENS, and 24.2 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 31.3] for LLLT on VAS. Follow-up data up to 12 weeks were sparse, but positive effects seemed to persist for at least 4 weeks after the course of LLLT, EA and TENS treatment was stopped. CONCLUSION: TENS, EA and LLLT administered with optimal doses in an intensive 2-4 week treatment regimen, seem to offer clinically relevant short-term pain relief for OAK  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis,Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 76  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Black, S.; Carey, E.; Webber, A.; Neish, N.; Gilbert, R. url  openurl
  Title Determining the efficacy of auricular acupuncture for reducing anxiety in patients withdrawing from psychoactive drugs Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of substance abuse treatment Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Anxiety; Substance-Related Disorders; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Auricular Acupuncture; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Group Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Usual Care Control, Unspecified  
  Abstract Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a widely accepted treatment option for substance abuse that is used in more than 700 treatment centers worldwide. Despite claims of perceived clinical benefits by patients and treatment staff, research efforts have failed to substantiate purported benefits, and the mechanism(s) by which AA serves in the treatment of addiction remain inconclusive. Numerous studies have shown AA to be an effective treatment for perioperative anxiety. In this study, we hypothesize that AA reduces the anxiety associated with withdrawal from psychoactive drugs. The study used a randomized, controlled design and included a sample of 101 patients recruited from an addiction treatment service. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatment groups (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association [NADA] AA, AA at sham points, or treatment setting control) and were instructed to attend treatment sessions for 3 days. The primary outcome measure state anxiety was assessed using a pretest-posttest treatment design. The study hypothesis was not confirmed. The NADA protocol was not more effective than sham or treatment setting control in reducing anxiety. The widespread acceptance of AA in the treatment of addiction remains controversial.  
  Address Addiction Prevention and Treatment Services, Capital District Health Authority, PO Box 896, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada B2Y 3Z6.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 101  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Anxiety
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 77  
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Author Bo, Q.; Zhang, J. openurl 
  Title Observation on Therapeutic Effects of Scalp Acupuncture Analgesia on Childbirth Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 6-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Women's Health; Labor Pain; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Labor, Obstetric  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 80  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Borud, E. K.; Alraek, T.; White, A.; Grimsgaard, S. url  openurl
  Title The acupuncture treatment for postmenopausal hot flushes (Acuflash) study: traditional Chinese medicine diagnoses and acupuncture points used, and their relation to the treatment response Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 101-108  
  Keywords Hot Flashes; Climacteric; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Moxibustion; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Warming Needle; Usual Care Control, Educational; AcuTrials  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled Acuflash study evaluated the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture on postmenopausal vasomotor symptoms and health-related quality of life. It concluded that use of acupuncture in addition to self-care can contribute to a clinically relevant reduction of hot flushes and increased health-related quality of life. This article reports on the TCM syndrome diagnoses and acupuncture points used and their relation to the treatment response, and on treatment reactions and adverse events. METHODS: The acupuncture group (n = 134) received 10 acupuncture treatment sessions and advice on self-care; the control group (n = 133) received advice on self-care only. The study acupuncturists met the current membership criteria of the Norwegian Acupuncture Society, and had at least 3 years' experience of practising TCM acupuncture. They were free to diagnose and select acupuncture points for each participant, after initial discussion. RESULTS: Fifty per cent of the participants in the acupuncture group were diagnosed with Kidney Yin Xu as their primary TCM syndrome diagnosis. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the syndrome groups regarding the distribution of responders and non-responders, nor regarding the change in health-related quality of life scores. A core of common acupuncture points (SP6, HT6, KI7, KI6, CV4, LU7, LI4, and LR3) were used in all the syndromes, and in addition multiple idiosyncratic points. Core point selection and frequency of use did not differ between responders and non-responders. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: Factors other than the TCM syndrome diagnoses and the point selection may be of importance regarding the outcome of the treatment.  
  Address The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso, Norway; einar.borud@uit.no.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 267  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 84  
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Author Bower, W. F.; Diao, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a treatment for nocturnal enuresis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Autonomic neuroscience : basic &amp; clinical Abbreviated Journal Auton Neurosci  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Nocturnal Enuresis; Urologic Diseases; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bed Wetting  
  Abstract Acupuncture can influence spinal micturition centers and parasympathetic innervation to the urinary tract and is known to modulate brain function via the descending serotonergic system. There are numerous difficulties in evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in patients with nocturnal enuresis (NE), since the patient group is frequently heterogenous and the intervention is commonly given in association with other modalities. Until recently incomplete reporting of the quality aspects of studies has also limited evaluation of treatment effects. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate reports from both Western and Eastern medicines in which acupuncture was compared to some other treatment modality in children with nocturnal enuresis. Focusing on Chinese language sources 41 new studies of acupuncture for NE were identified, 13 of which were clinical trials that reported parameters of treatment and defined outcome measures of efficacy. A standardized data extraction form was used to evaluate outcome measures and to scrutinize the quality aspects of studies. All barr one study reported the efficacy rate of acupuncture as part of a TCM package to be higher than alarm therapy, the gold standard of Western medicine intervention for NE. Acupuncture as a monotherapy for the treatment of NE appears to be less effective than acupuncture given as part of a combined Traditional Chinese Medicine approach. Electroacupuncture enhances treatment outcomes.  
  Address Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Nocturnal Enuresis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 87  
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Author Bu, Y. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Combined with Massage for Treatment of Cervical Spondylosis of Vertebral Artery Type Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 6 Pages 44-46  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Massage; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Spondylosis;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 96  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 48  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 94  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bullock, M. L.; Kiresuk, T. J.; Sherman, R. E.; Lenz, S. K.; Culliton, P. D.; Boucher, T. A.; Nolan, C. J. url  openurl
  Title A large randomized placebo controlled study of auricular acupuncture for alcohol dependence Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 71-77  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Alcoholism; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Substance-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract We report clinical data on the efficacy of acupuncture for alcohol dependence. 503 patients whose primary substance of abuse was alcohol participated in this randomized, single blind, placebo controlled trial. Patients were assigned to either specific acupuncture, nonspecific acupuncture, symptom based acupuncture or convention treatment alone. Alcohol use was assessed, along with depression, anxiety, functional status, and preference for therapy. This article will focus on results pertaining to alcohol use. Significant improvement was shown on nearly all measures. There were few differences associated with treatment assignment and there were no treatment differences on alcohol use measures, although 49% of subjects reported acupuncture reduced their desire for alcohol. The placebo and preference for treatment measures did not materially effect the results. Generally, acupuncture was not found to make a significant contribution over and above that achieved by conventional treatment alone in reduction of alcohol use  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 18  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 503  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 70  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 99  
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Author Cai, D. F. url  openurl
  Title Warm-needling plus Tuina relaxing for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 23-24  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Nervous System Diseases; RCT; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Tuina; Moxibustion; Warming Needle; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupoint Injection; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; Wounds and Injuries; Cumulative Trauma Disorders; Massage;  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To probe into quick and effective therapies for carpal tunnel syndrome. METHODS: Totally 98 cases of carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group received warm-needling plus Tuina relaxing, while the control group was treated by hormone block therapy and drug medication. RESULTS: The cure rate was 81.7% in the treatment group and 47.4% in the control group, with a significant difference between the two groups (P &lt; 0.01). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture plus Tuina manipulation is a simple therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome, but with remarkable therapeutic effects.  
  Address Zhangjiagang First Municipal People's Hospital, Zhangjiagang, Jiangsu 215600, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 98  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 103  
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