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Author Acupuncture Research Resource Centre url  openurl
  Title Sports Injuries and Acupuncture: The Evidence for Effectiveness Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Brit Acupun  
  Volume 11 A2 Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Wounds and Injuries; Sports Medicine; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sports Medicine
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 3  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Axelsson, A.; Andersson, S.; Gu, L. D. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in the management of tinnitus: A placebo controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1994 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Audiology  
  Volume 33 Issue Pages 351-360  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Sham TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tinnitus; Verum Acupoint Control; Ear Diseases; Symptom Based Point Selection  
  Abstract The present study was performed on 20 patients randomly selected from a large group with noise-induced tinnitus in order to investigate the effect of acupuncture on their tinnitus. The patients were divided into two groups. One group first received classical Chinese needle acupuncture for 5 weeks, and the other was given a placebo procedure; after a 2-week interval, the procedures were reversed. A single-blind cross-over design was used. Acupuncture was given by a Chinese otolaryngologist around the ear as well as at distal points on the extremities. Placebo consisted of mock electrical stimulation via surface electrodes connected to a Chinese electro-acupuncture stimulator which delivered a weak sound and a light flash at a frequency of 2 Hz but no current to the surface electrodes. The effect was evaluated by the use of visual analogue scales. No significant difference between acupuncture and placebo was found in annoyance, awareness or loudness of the tinnitus. Many patients indicated a preference for acupuncture due to unspecific effects such as improved sleep, decreased muscle tension and improved blood circulation. It is concluded that acupuncture has no specific alleviating effect on noise-induced tinnitus.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 20  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 47  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Balk, J.; Day, R.; Rosenzweig, M.; Beriwal, S. url  openurl
  Title Pilot, randomized, modified, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Soc.Integr.Oncol.  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4-11  
  Keywords Cancer-Related Fatigue; Neoplasms; Fatigue; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Cancer;  
  Abstract Cancer-related fatigue is a substantial problem for cancer patients and their caregivers, but no effective treatment exists. Acupuncture has been suggested to improve cancer-related fatigue, but no randomized clinical trials have been conducted. We hypothesized that true acupuncture, compared with sham acupuncture, would reduce cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients receiving external radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to determine effect size and feasibility. A modified, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. The subject, clinical staff, and assessor were blinded, but the acupuncturist was not. Subjects received acupuncture once to twice per week during the 6-week course of radiation therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks, which was 4 weeks after that last radiation session. Twenty-seven subjects enrolled, and 23 completed the last data collection. Both true and sham acupuncture groups had improved fatigue, fatigue distress, quality of life, and depression from baseline to 10 weeks, but the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The true acupuncture group improved 5.50 (SE, +/- 1.48) points on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Subscale (FACIT-F), whereas the sham acupuncture group improved by 3.73 (SE +/- 1.92) points. This difference was not statistically significant (p = .37). All subjects guessed that they were in the true acupuncture group. Our study was underpowered to find a statistically significant difference. To demonstrate a statistically significant improvement between true and sham acupuncture would require 75 subjects per group in a future study. Owing to poor recruitment, the feasibility of a larger trial using the same methodology is low. Despite being underpowered, it appears that subjects receiving true acupuncture may benefit more than subjects receiving sham acupuncture. In the discussion section, we review our experience with using a sham-needle controlled study  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Fatigue
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 54  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bao, Y. H.; Feng, W.; zhu, G.; Zou, C.; Gong, Y.; Ji, C.; Li, J. openurl 
  Title A Randomized and Comparative Study on Vascular Dementia Treated by Needling Remaining at Head Points Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 12-17  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; AcuTrials; Dementia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 40  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 62  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Beal, M. W.; Nield-Anderson, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for symptom relief in HIV-positive adults: lessons learned from a pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages 33-42  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; HIV Infections; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; HIV Infections  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Although acupuncture is used by many people with HIV disease as a complementary treatment to Western medicine, there is a lack of scientifically sound research on patient responses and outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting a larger study investigating the efficacy of acupuncture on symptom distress, psychological distress, and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals. DESIGN: This pilot study used a block randomization, single-blinded design. SETTING: Yale University General Clinical Research Center. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven HIV-positive participants. INTERVENTION: Patients were grouped by CD4 cell counts and received acupuncture treatments twice each week for 3 weeks. The experimental group received a protocol with 2 components: one tailored to the individual's symptoms and a second standardized component treatment designed to promote health and immune function. The control-needling group received a standardized acupuncture involving stimulation of acupuncture points identified as “clinically irrelevant” in treating the conditions under investigation (i.e., acupuncture points that have consistently not been cited as helpful for symptoms of relevant conditions or immune disorders). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The HIV-Symptom List was administered to gather data on symptom distress, the Brief Symptom Inventory was used to gather data on psychological distress, and the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection was administered to collect data on quality of life. RESULTS: Preliminary data from small numbers of participants showed trends toward improvement in symptoms and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: A follow-up pilot study will focus on the use of acupuncture to relieve gastrointestinal symptoms in people with HIV  
  Address Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Conn., USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition HIV Infections
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 63  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjordal, J. M.; Johnson, M. I.; Lopes-Martins, R. A.; Bogen, B.; Chow, R.; Ljunggren, A. E. url  openurl
  Title Short-term efficacy of physical interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 51-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Laser Acupuncture; Magnets; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; Systematic Review; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; TENS; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Treatment efficacy of physical agents in osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) pain has been largely unknown, and this systematic review was aimed at assessing their short-term efficacies for pain relief. Aims and methods: Systematic review with meta-analysis of efficacy within 1-4 weeks and 5-12 weeks. RESULTS: 36 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 2434 patients where 1391 patients received active treatment. 33 trials satisfied three or more out of five methodological criteria (Jadad scale). The patient sample had a mean age of 65.1 years and mean baseline pain of 62.9 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Within 4 weeks of the commencement of treatment manual acupuncture, static magnets and ultrasound therapies did not offer statistically significant short-term pain relief over placebo. Pulsed electromagnetic fields offered a small reduction in pain of 6.9 mm [95% CI: 2.2 to 11.6] (n=487). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, including interferential currents), electro-acupuncture (EA) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) offered clinically relevant pain relieving effects of 18.8 mm [95% CI: 9.6 to 28.1] (n=414), 21.9 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 26.5] (n=73) and 17.7 mm[95% CI: 8.1 to 27.3] (n=343) on VAS respectively versus placebo control. In a subgroup analysis of trials with assumed optimal doses, short-term efficacy increased to 22.2 mm [95% CI: 18.1 to 26.3] for TENS, and 24.2 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 31.3] for LLLT on VAS. Follow-up data up to 12 weeks were sparse, but positive effects seemed to persist for at least 4 weeks after the course of LLLT, EA and TENS treatment was stopped. CONCLUSION: TENS, EA and LLLT administered with optimal doses in an intensive 2-4 week treatment regimen, seem to offer clinically relevant short-term pain relief for OAK  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis,Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 76  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bo, Q.; Zhang, J. openurl 
  Title Observation on Therapeutic Effects of Scalp Acupuncture Analgesia on Childbirth Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 6-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Scalp Acupuncture; Women's Health; Labor Pain; Analgesia, Obstetrical; Labor, Obstetric  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 80  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bu, Y. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Combined with Massage for Treatment of Cervical Spondylosis of Vertebral Artery Type Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal EastWest  
  Volume 4 Issue 6 Pages 44-46  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Massage; Neck Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Spondylosis;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 96  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Spondylosis
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 48  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 94  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bullock, M. L.; Kiresuk, T. J.; Sherman, R. E.; Lenz, S. K.; Culliton, P. D.; Boucher, T. A.; Nolan, C. J. url  openurl
  Title A large randomized placebo controlled study of auricular acupuncture for alcohol dependence Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Subst Abuse Treat  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 71-77  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Alcoholism; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Substance-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract We report clinical data on the efficacy of acupuncture for alcohol dependence. 503 patients whose primary substance of abuse was alcohol participated in this randomized, single blind, placebo controlled trial. Patients were assigned to either specific acupuncture, nonspecific acupuncture, symptom based acupuncture or convention treatment alone. Alcohol use was assessed, along with depression, anxiety, functional status, and preference for therapy. This article will focus on results pertaining to alcohol use. Significant improvement was shown on nearly all measures. There were few differences associated with treatment assignment and there were no treatment differences on alcohol use measures, although 49% of subjects reported acupuncture reduced their desire for alcohol. The placebo and preference for treatment measures did not materially effect the results. Generally, acupuncture was not found to make a significant contribution over and above that achieved by conventional treatment alone in reduction of alcohol use  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 18  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 503  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 70  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 99  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Carlsson, C. P.; Axemo, P.; al, Bodin A et url  openurl
  Title Manual acupuncture reduces hyperemesis gravidarum: A placebo-controlled, randomized, single-blind, cross-over study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Pain Symptom Manage  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 273-279  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cross-Over Design; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hyperemesis Gravidarum; Penetrating Sham; Morning Sickness; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract Hyperemesis gravidarum, severe vomiting, develops in about 1-2% of all pregnancies. Acupuncture on the point PC6 above the wrist on the palmar side has been found to prevent some types of nausea and vomiting. The purpose of the present study was to see if acupuncture, in addition to standard treatment, could hasten the improvement of hyperemesis gravidarum. Thirty-three women with hyperemesis were evaluated in a randomized, single-blind, crossover comparison of two methods of acupuncture, active (deep) PC6 acupuncture or placebo (superficial) acupuncture. The women estimated their degree of nausea on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The daily number of emesis episodes were documented. Crossover analyses showed that there was a significantly faster reduction of nausea VAS and more women who stopped vomiting after active acupuncture than after placebo acupuncture. This study suggests that active PC6 acupuncture, in combination with standard treatment, could make women with hyperemesis gravidarum better faster than placebo acupuncture  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Hyperemesis Gravidarum
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 74  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 114  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Carlsson, C. P.; Sjolund, B. H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for chronic low back pain: a randomized placebo-controlled study with long-term follow-up Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 296-305  
  Keywords TENS; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Verum Acupoint Control; Low Back Pain, Chronic  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether a series of needle acupuncture treatments produced long-term relief of chronic low back pain. DESIGN: A blinded placebo-controlled study with an independent observer. The patients were randomized to receive manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or active placebo (mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). Subjects were examined and monitored by an investigator who was blinded to the treatment given. SETTING: A tertiary-level pain clinic at a Swedish university hospital. PATIENTS: Fifty consecutive patients (33 women, 17 men; mean age, 49.8 years) with chronic low back pain (mean pain duration, 9.5 years) and without rhizopathy or history of acupuncture treatment were included in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Treatments were given once per week for 8 weeks. Two further treatments were given during the follow-up assessment period of 6 months or longer. OUTCOME MEASURES: The independent observer made a global assessment of the patients 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The patients kept pain diaries to score pain intensity twice daily, analgesic intake, and quality of sleep daily, and activity level weekly. RESULTS: At the 1-month independent assessment, 16 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p <0.05). At the 6-month follow-up assessment, 14 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p <0.05). A significant decrease in pain intensities occurred at 1 and 3 months in the acupuncture groups compared with the placebo group. There was a significant improvement in return to work, quality of sleep, and analgesic intake in subjects treated with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: The authors found a long-term pain-relieving effect of needle acupuncture compared with true placebo in some patients with chronic nociceptive low back pain  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. akusyd@swipnet.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 32 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score 62  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 115  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Carlsson, J.; Wedel, A.; Carlsson, G. E.; Blomstrand, C. url  openurl
  Title Tension Headache and signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorders treated with acupuncture or physiotherapy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1990 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal The Pain Clinic  
  Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 229-238  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Ashi Acupuncture Style; Craniomandibular Disorders; Physical Therapy; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Educational; Usual Care Control, Physical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders; Tension-Type Headache; TMJ; Stomatognathic Diseases; TMD  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Craniomandibular Disorders
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 118  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheuk, D. K.; Wong, V. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for epilepsy Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 4 Pages CD005062-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Epilepsy; Herbal Formula; Seizures; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Seizures are poorly controlled in many people with epilepsy despite adequate current antiepileptic treatments. There is increasing interest in alternative therapies such as acupuncture; however, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support the use of acupuncture. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2006. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with epilepsy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (March 2008) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases from inception to March 2008. Reference lists from relevant trials were reviewed. No language restrictions were imposed. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture with placebo or sham treatment, antiepileptic drugs or no treatment; or comparing acupuncture plus other treatments with the same other treatments. involving people of any age with any type of epilepsy. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted trial data and assessed trial quality. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven small trials with 914 participants, of generally poor methodological quality and with short follow up met the inclusion criteria. Ten trials were carried out in China and one in Norway.Two trials found that more children treated with needle acupuncture plus Chinese herbs achieved 75% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.05) and 50% or greater reduction in seizure duration (pooled RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.62) compared with Chinese herbs alone. However, after combining the results of four trials that compared the treatment group with a control group that could yield the net effect of needle acupuncture, we found that there was no significant difference between the treatment and the control groups in any reduction of seizure frequency (pooled RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.17). Compared to phenytoin, the pooled results from two trials showed that patients who received needle acupuncture appeared more likely to achieve 75% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (pooled RR 2.14, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.1). Compared to valproate, the pooled results from three trials showed catgut implantation at acupoints appeared more likely to result in 75% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (pooled RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.01 to 5.36). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence does not support acupuncture as a treatment for epilepsy  
  Address Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Epilepsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 164  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheuk, D.; Wong, V. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for epilepsy Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 2 Pages CD005062-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Epilepsy; Herbal Formula; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Seizures are poorly controlled in many people with epilepsy despite adequate current antiepileptic treatments. There is increasing interest in alternative therapies such as acupuncture; however, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support the use of acupuncture. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with epilepsy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (June 2005) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2005). We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, TCMLARS, China Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and National Institute of Health Clinical Trials Database from inception to June 2005. Reference lists from relevant trials were reviewed. No language restrictions were imposed. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials evaluating any form of acupuncture involving people of any age with any type of epilepsy were included. Trials included were those comparing acupuncture with placebo, sham or no treatment; or comparing acupuncture plus other treatments with the same other treatments. Trials that only compared different acupuncture methods or compared acupuncture alone with other treatments were excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted trial data and assessed trial quality using the Jadad score. Relative risk (RR) was used for binary data and weighted mean difference for continuous data, and 95% confidence intervals are given. Where possible, analyses were by intention to treat. MAIN RESULTS: Three small trials of varying methodological quality and with short follow up met the inclusion criteria. Two studied children in China and one studied adults in Norway. The two Chinese studies compared acupuncture plus Chinese herbs with Chinese herbs alone while the Norwegian study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. The two Chinese studies found that more children treated with acupuncture achieved 75% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.05) and seizure duration (RR 2.38, 95% CI 1.13 to 5) with a significant 50% or greater reduction in seizure duration (RR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.73). However, the two trials were of low quality without adequate description of randomisation method, concealment of randomisation or blinding. On the other hand, the higher quality Norwegian trial found that acupuncture did not improve the mean seizure frequency, seizure-free weeks, or quality of life in adults. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence does not support acupuncture as a treatment for epilepsy. Much larger high quality clinical trials employing appropriate controls are needed  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Epilepsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 168  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheuk, D.; Yeung, W.; Chung, K.; Wong, V. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for insomnia Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages CD005472-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Insomnia; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; AcuTrials  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although conventional non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for insomnia are effective in many people, alternative therapies such as acupuncture are still widely practiced. However, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support its use. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in people with insomnia. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Dissertation Abstracts International, CINAHL, AMED (the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), TCMLARS (Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the National Institute of Health Clinical Trials Database, the Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register, the Trials Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, from inception to 2006, and the sleep bibliography, which is available at www.websciences.org/bibliosleep. We searched reference lists of retrieved articles, and contacted trial authors and experts in the field for information on ongoing/completed trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials evaluating any form of acupuncture involving participants of any age with any type of insomnia were included. Included trials compared acupuncture with placebo or sham or no treatment, or acupuncture plus other treatments compared with the same other treatments. Trials that compared only acupuncture methods or compared acupuncture alone against other treatments alone were excluded, since they did not yield the net effect of acupuncture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality according to a set of criteria for risk of selection bias, performance bias, attrition bias and detection bias. Relative risk (RR) and standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals were used for binary and continuous outcomes respectively. Data were combined in meta-analyses (on an intention-to-treat basis), where more than one trial without significant clinical heterogeneity presented the same outcome. MAIN RESULTS: Seven trials met the inclusion criteria. The studies included 590 participants with insomnia, of whom 56 dropped out. Participant age ranged from 15 to 98 years, and the duration of insomnia varied from 6 months to 19 years. Co-existing medical conditions contributing to insomnia included stroke, end-stage renal disease and pregnancy. Apart from conventional needle acupuncture, different variants of acupuncture such as acupressure, auricular magnetic and seed therapy, and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were evaluated. Meta-analysis was limited because of considerable heterogeneity between comparison groups and between outcome measures.Based on the findings from individual trials, the review suggested that acupuncture and acupressure may help to improve sleep quality scores when compared to placebo (SMD = -1.08, 95% CI = -1.86 to -0.31, p=0.006) or no treatment (SMD -0.55, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.21, p=0.002). TEAS also resulted in better sleep quality score in one trial (SMD = -0.74, 95% CI = -1.22 to -0.26, p=0.003). However, the efficacy of acupuncture or its variants was inconsistent between studies for many sleep parameters, such as sleep onset latency, total sleep duration and wake after sleep onset. The combined result from three studies reporting subjective insomnia improvement showed that acupuncture or its variants was not more significantly effective than control (RR = 1.66, 95% CI = 0.68 to -4.03) and significant statistical heterogeneity was observed. Only one study reported an adverse event, with one out of 16 patients (6.3%) withdrawing from acupuncture because of pain. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The small number of randomised controlled trials, together with the poor methodological quality and significant clinical heterogeneity, means that the current evidence is not sufficiently extensive or rigorous to support the use of any form of acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia. Larger high quality clinical trials employing appropriate randomisation concealment and blinding with longer follow-up are needed to further investigate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 169  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S. H.; Whang, W. W. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Alcohol Dependence: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Acupuncture; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used in the treatment of substance-related disorders for the past 30 years. However, a systematic review to assess the effect of various types of acupuncture for alcohol dependence has not yet been performed. The present systematic review assessed the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs of acupuncture for alcohol dependence up to June 2008 with no language restrictions. The methodological qualities of eligible studies were assessed using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook. Results: Eleven studies, which comprised a total of 1,110 individual cases, were systematically reviewed. Only 2 of 11 trials reported satisfactorily all quality criteria. Four trials comparing acupuncture treatment and sham treatments reported data for alcohol craving. Three studies reported that there were no significant differences. Among 4 trials comparing acupuncture and no acupuncture with conventional therapies, 3 reported significant reductions. No differences between acupuncture and sham treatments were found for completion rates (Risk Ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.91 to 1.25) or acupuncture and no acupuncture (Risk Ratio = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.67). Only 3 RCTs reported acupuncture-related adverse events, which were mostly minimal. Conclusions: The results of the included studies were equivocal, and the poor methodological quality and the limited number of the trials do not allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of alcohol dependence. More research and well-designed, rigorous, and large clinical trials are necessary to address these issues  
  Address From the Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 177  
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Author Crew, K. D.; Capodice, J. L.; Greenlee, H.; Apollo, A.; Jacobson, J. S.; Raptis, G.; Blozie, K.; Sierra, A.; Hershman, D. L. url  openurl
  Title Pilot study of acupuncture for the treatment of joint symptoms related to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Cancer S  
  Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 283-291  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy; Auricular Acupuncture; Breast Cancer; Cancer; Cross-Over Design; No Treatment Control; Pain; Pilot Study; Postmenopause; RCT; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Neoplasms; Arthritis  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have become the standard of care for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive breast cancer. However, patients receiving AIs may experience joint symptoms, which may lead to early discontinuation of this effective therapy. We hypothesize that acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for AI-induced arthralgias. METHODS: Postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer who had self-reported musculoskeletal pain related to adjuvant AI therapy were randomized in a crossover study to receive acupuncture twice weekly for 6 weeks followed by observation or vice-versa. The intervention included full body and auricular acupuncture, and a joint-specific point prescription. Outcome measures included the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) quality of life measure, and serum levels of inflammatory markers, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Twenty-one women were enrolled and two discontinued early. From baseline to the end of treatment, patients reported improvement in the mean BPI-SF worst pain scores (5.3 to 3.3, p = 0.01), pain severity (3.7 to 2.5, p = 0.02), and pain-related functional interference (3.1 to 1.7, p = 0.02), as well as the WOMAC function subscale and FACT-G physical well-being (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). No adverse events were reported. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, acupuncture reduced AI-related joint symptoms and improved functional ability and was well-tolerated. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Musculoskeletal side effects are common among breast cancer survivors on adjuvant AI therapy, therefore, effective treatments are needed for symptom relief and to improve adherence to these life-saving medications  
  Address Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 6 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 21  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Arthritis
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 211  
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Author David, J.; Modi, S.; Aluko, A.A.et al url  openurl
  Title Chronic neck pain: A comparison of acupuncture treatment and physiotherapy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Brit J Rheumatol  
  Volume 37 Issue Pages 1118-2230  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Neck Pain; Pain; Physical Therapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Physical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture, as compared with physiotherapy, in the management of chronic neck pain. DESIGN: Seventy adult patients with non-inflammatory neck pain of >6 weeks duration and with no abnormal neurology were randomly assigned to receive either of the treatments. Thirty-five patients were included in each group. OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain by visual analogue scale and neck pain questionnaire, improvement in range of movement of neck relative to baseline, and well-being (general health questionnaire). Measurements were recorded at the start of treatment, at 6 weeks and at 6 months. RESULTS: Both treatment groups improved in all criteria. Acupuncture was slightly more effective in patients who had higher baseline pain scores. CONCLUSIONS: Both acupuncture and physiotherapy are effective forms of treatment. Since an untreated control group was not part of the study design, the magnitude of this improvement cannot be quantified  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Neck Pain
  Disease Category Neck Pain OCSI Score 56  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 223  
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Author David, J.; Townsend, S.; Sathanathan, R.; Kriss, S.; Dore, C. J. url  openurl
  Title The effect of acupuncture on patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Rheumatology (Oxford)  
  Volume 38 Issue 9 Pages 864-869  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Arthritis, Rheumatoid; Autoimmune Diseases; Cross-Over Design; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Acupuncture is commonly used by patients with chronic painful musculoskeletal disorders. There are, however, few well-designed studies of its efficacy. This paper describes a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design to evaluate acupuncture as a useful treatment adjunct in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Sixty-four patients were centrally randomized from a hospital-based rheumatology out-patient clinic. Fifty-six patients were suitable for study, all were on second-line therapy and aged 18-75 yr. There had been no change in therapy for the preceding 3 months. Patients who had previous acupuncture, anticoagulation, fear of needles or infection were excluded. Single-point (Liver 3) acupuncture or placebo was given with an intervening 6 week wash-out period. The acupuncturist, patient and statistician were blinded as far as possible. The outcome measures included the inflammatory markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein), visual analogue scale of pain, global patient assessment, 28 swollen and tender joint count, and a general health questionnaire. RESULTS: The results demonstrated no significant effect of treatment or period and no significant interaction between treatment and period for any outcome variable. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture of this type cannot be considered as a useful adjunct to therapy in patients with RA. Possible reasons why this is the case are discussed  
  Address Royal Berkshire Hospital NHS Trust, Reading, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 56  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score 82  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 224  
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Author Dieterle, S.; Li, C.; Greb, R.; Bartzsch, F.; Hatzmann, W.; Huang, D. url  openurl
  Title A prospective randomized placebo-controlled study of the effect of acupuncture in infertile patients with severe oligoasthenozoospermia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Fertil Steril  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Infertility, Male; Oligoasthenozoospermia; RCT; Sperm Concentration; Sperm Morphology; Sperm Motility; Sperm Quality; Genital Diseases, Male; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials  
  Abstract In this first prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study, 28 infertile patients with severe oligoasthenozoospermia received acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and 29 infertile patients received placebo acupuncture. A significantly higher percentage of motile sperm (World Health Organization categories A-C), but no effect on sperm concentration, was found after acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture  
  Address Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Witten/Herdecke, Dortmund, Germany; Infertility Center Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Infertility, Male
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 246  
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