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Author Korpan, M. I.; Dezu, Y.; Schneider, B.; Leitha, T.; Fialka-Moser, V. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in the treatment of posttraumatic pain syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Acta Orthop Belg  
  Volume 65 Issue 2 Pages 197-201  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Pain; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control;  
  Abstract To test the hypothesis that classical Chinese acupuncture provides an additional benefit subjectively as well as objectively in patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy, a double-blind, placebo-controlled prospective trial was performed. Fourteen patients suffering clinically and scintigraphically from acute CRPS of the upper limb lasting of more than one but less than 6 months were studied. Patients were randomly assigned to either the classical acupuncture (group A) or sham acupuncture (group S), which was applied five times a week for three weeks and required 30 minutes. Both groups received the same defined standard treatment. The current state of pain was assessed by means of a visual analogue scale. Subjective success of treatment was rated by the patients by means of a rating scale. Each patient underwent a clinical examination and was investigated by 5-phase bone scan in order to confirm the diagnosis. The current state of pain as well as clinical parameters were almost identical in patients of group A and of group S at the beginning. During therapy clinical parameters as well as pain improved in both groups and reached nearly normal levels after 6 months. Owing to the small number of patients in our study, no differences between sham and treatment group could be recognized. For a definitive statement the treatment of further patients in both groups is planned. Determinations of the effect of acupuncture on clinical parameters, based on long-term follow-ups are projected  
  Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Vienna, Austria  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 14  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score 40  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 601  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kotani, N.; Hashimoto, H.; Sato, Y.; Sessler, D. I.; Yoshioka, H.; Kitayama, M.; Yasuda, T.; Matsuki, A. url  openurl
  Title Preoperative intradermal acupuncture reduces postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting, analgesic requirement, and sympathoadrenal responses Type of Study RCT
  Year 2001 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Anesthesiology  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 349-356  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Japanese Acupuncture Style; Nausea; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Verum Acupoint Control; Vomiting; Anesthesia and Analgesia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In a controlled and double-blind study, the authors tested the hypothesis that preoperative insertion of intradermal needles at acupoints 2.5 cm from the spinal vertebrae (bladder meridian) provide satisfactory postoperative analgesia. METHODS: The authors enrolled patients scheduled for elective upper and lower abdominal surgery. Before anesthesia, patients undergoing each type of surgery were randomly assigned to one of two groups: acupuncture (n = 50 and n = 39 for upper and lower abdominal surgery, respectively) or control (n = 48 and n = 38 for upper and lower abdominal surgery, respectively). In the acupuncture group, intradermal needles were inserted to the left and right of bladder meridian 18-24 and 20-26 in upper and lower abdominal surgery before induction of anesthesia, respectively. Postoperative analgesia was maintained with epidural morphine and bolus doses of intravenous morphine. Consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Incisional pain at rest and during coughing and deep visceral pain were recorded during recovery and for 4 days thereafter on a four-point verbal rating scale. We also evaluated time-dependent changes in plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamines. RESULTS: Starting from the recovery room, intradermal acupuncture increased the fraction of patients with good pain relief as compared with the control (P < 0.05). Consumption of supplemental intravenous morphine was reduced 50%, and the incidence of postoperative nausea was reduced 20-30% in the acupuncture patients who had undergone either upper or lower abdominal surgery (P < 0.01). Plasma cortisol and epinephrine concentrations were reduced 30-50% in the acupuncture group during recovery and on the first postoperative day (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Preoperative insertion of intradermal needles reduces postoperative pain, the analgesic requirement, and opioid-related side effects after both upper and lower abdominal surgery. Acupuncture analgesia also reduces the activation of the sympathoadrenal system that normally accompanies surgery  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, University of Hirosaki School of Medicine, Japan. nao@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 107  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Pain (General)
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 602  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kunz, S.; Schulz, M.; Lewitzky, M.; Driessen, M.; Rau, H. url  openurl
  Title Ear acupuncture for alcohol withdrawal in comparison with aromatherapy: a randomized-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Alcohol Cl  
  Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 436-442  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Aromatherapy; Auricular Acupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Psychotherapy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; TCM Acupuncture Style; Substance-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract Background: There is increasing clinical acceptance of acupuncture as a treatment of substance-related disorders. Little is known about acupuncture as a treatment for the withdrawal syndrome in inpatient settings. We compared auricular needle acupuncture with aromatherapy in reducing the duration and severity of symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Methods: Inpatients undergoing alcohol withdrawal were randomly allocated to needle acupuncture (n=55) and aromatherapy (n=54). Both therapies were applied daily during the first 5 consecutive treatment days. The rating scale for the assessment of the alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS scale) served as the main dependent variable and was applied daily during the first 5 days of the withdrawal. Further measures included a subjective visual analog scale of craving and the Self Assessment Manikin (SAM). Results: Thirty-six of the 55 patients who received acupuncture, and 38 of the 54 patients who received aromatherapy, finished the study regularly. The groups differed in their initial self-reported arousal, which then served as a covariate in the further analyses. Neither the extent of craving nor of withdrawal symptoms differed between groups over the observation period. Self-rated arousal decreased in response to both treatments from days 1 to 2 (p<0.001) and within single days (p<0.001), and we found a significant interaction between pretreatment versus posttreatment and days (p<0.001). Interactions including between-subjects effects and intervention did not achieve the significance level. Conclusion: The results do not support the assumption of a superiority of acupuncture over the control therapy in its specific effects on alcohol withdrawal symptoms  
  Address Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 5  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 109  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kvist, L. J.; Louise Hall-Lord, M.; Rydhstroem, H.; Wilde, Larsson B. url  openurl
  Title A randomised-controlled trial in Sweden of acupuncture and care interventions for the relief of inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Midwifery  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: to further compare acupuncture treatment and care interventions for the relief of inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation and to investigate the relationship between bacteria in the breast milk and clinical signs and symptoms. DESIGN: randomised, non-blinded, controlled trial of acupuncture and care interventions. SETTING: a midwife-led breast feeding clinic in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 205 mothers with 210 cases of inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation agreed to participate. The mothers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups, two of which included acupuncture among the care interventions and one without acupuncture. All groups were given essential care. Protocols, which included scales for erythema, breast tension and pain, were maintained for each day of contact with the breast feeding clinic. A Severity Index (SI) for each mother and each day was created by adding together the scores on the erythema, breast tension and pain scales. The range of the SI was 0 (least severe) to 19 (most severe). FINDINGS: no significant difference was found in numbers of mothers in the treatment groups, with the lowest possible score for severity of symptoms on contact days 3, 4 or 5. No statistically significant differences were found between the treatment groups for number of contact days needed until the mother felt well enough to discontinue contact with the breast feeding clinic or for number of mothers prescribed antibiotics. Significant differences were found in the mean SI scores on contact days 3 and 4 between the non-acupuncture group and the two acupuncture groups. Mothers with less favourable outcomes (6 contact days, n=61) were, at first contact with the midwife, more often given advice on correction of the baby's attachment to the breast. An obstetrician was called to examine 20% of the mothers, and antibiotic treatment was prescribed for 15% of the study population. The presence of Group B streptococci in the breast milk was related to less favourable outcomes. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: if acupuncture treatment is acceptable to the mother, this, together with care interventions such as correction of breast feeding position and babies' attachment to the breast, might be a more expedient and less invasive choice of treatment than the use of oxytocin nasal spray. Midwives, nurses or medical practitioners with specialist competence in breast feeding should be the primary care providers for mothers with inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation. The use of antibiotics for inflammatory symptoms of the breast should be closely monitored in order to help the global community reduce resistance development among bacterial pathogens  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Floor 2, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, SE-251 87 Sweden; Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 5 Days Frequency N/A Number of Participants 205  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Mastitis
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 607  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kvist, L. J.; Wilde, Larsson B.; Hall-Lord, M. L.; Rydhstroem, H. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture and care interventions on the outcome of inflammatory symptoms of the breast in lactating women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Int Nurs Rev  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 56-64  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Lactation Disorders; Mastitis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications;  
  Abstract Objective: To compare modes of care and treatment for lactating women with inflammatory symptoms of the breast, with special focus on the use of acupuncture. Method: Eighty-eight mothers were randomized into three treatment groups. All three groups were given advice regarding emptying of the breasts and care in the form of comfort interventions. Acupuncture was included in the treatment regime for two of the groups. A severity index was created by adding together scores for signs and symptoms: breast tension, erythema and pain. Findings: Mothers in all groups expressed relative satisfaction with the breastfeeding situation despite considerable discomfort. There was no significant difference between the groups for the number of mothers requiring more than three contact days for recovery nor for their severity index scores on day 3. These findings must be interpreted with care but may suggest that care interventions play as great a part in the recovery of these women as acupuncture treatment or the use of oxytocin spray. Antibiotic therapy was used in 9% of the study population, which is in contrast to other studies. Proposed future action: Based on these results, a new study has been designed to test the hypothesis that acupuncture hastens recovery from inflammatory processes in the lactating breast and approximately 200 mothers will be randomized in a new expanded study  
  Address 1 Care Development Midwife and Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hospital of Helsingborg, Sweden Associate Professor, and Senior Lecturer, Institution for Health and Care, University of Karlstad, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Days Frequency N/A Number of Participants 88  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Mastitis
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 608  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kvorning, N.; Christiansson, C.; Akeson, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture facilitates neuromuscular and oculomotor responses to skin incision with no influence on auditory evoked potentials under sevoflurane anaesthesia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Acta Anaesthesiol Scand  
  Volume 47 Issue 9 Pages 1073-1078  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; AcuTrials; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Pain, Intraoperative  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: More sevoflurane was recently found to be required to prevent movement in response to surgical incision in anaesthetized patients subjected to electro-acupuncture (EA) than to sham procedures. The present study was designed to compare differences in movement, dilatation of the pupils, divergence of the eye axes and activity of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) between patients given and those not given EA under standardized sevoflurane anaesthesia. METHODS: Neuromuscular, oculomotor and AEP responses to skin incision were assessed with and without a bilateral 2-Hz burst EA in patients under steady-state anaesthesia maintained with 1.8% of sevoflurane. Forty-five healthy patients, scheduled for laparoscopic sterilization, were randomized for EA (n = 22) or sham (n = 23) procedures between induction of anaesthesia and start of surgery. Middle latency AEP activity was recorded and interpreted by the A-line ARX (autoregression with exogenous input) index (AAI). RESULTS: More acupuncture than sham patients were found to respond to skin incision with movement of the neck or limbs (77% vs. 43%; P = 0.021), dilatation of the pupils (77% vs. 39%; P = 0.001) and divergence of the eye axes (72% vs. 39%; P = 0.023), whereas there was no difference in AAI response. CONCLUSION: Electro-acupuncture facilitates physiological responses to nociceptive stimulation under sevoflurane anaesthesia. Differences in neuromuscular and oculomotor responses between acupuncture and sham patients under general anaesthesia are probably not associated with interaction between EA and the depth of anaesthesia, as AEP activity was similar in the two groups  
  Address Departments of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital of Helsingborg, Helsingborg, and Malmo University Hospital, Lund University, Malmo, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 45  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Intraoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score 72  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 609  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kvorning, N.; Christiansson, C.; Beskow, A.; Bratt, O.; Akeson, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture fails to reduce but increases anaesthetic gas required to prevent movement in response to surgical incision Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Acta Anaesthesiol Scand  
  Volume 47 Issue 7 Pages 818-822  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain, Intraoperative  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is used for clinical pain relief but has not been evaluated under clinical anaesthesia. This study was designed to compare movement in response to surgical incision in anaesthetized patients subjected to electro-acupuncture (EA) or sham procedures. Our hypothesis was that EA stimulation would reduce the requirements for anaesthetic gas. METHODS: Forty-six healthy women, scheduled for laparoscopic sterilization at a Swedish county hospital, were randomized to have either the electro-acupuncture (n = 23) or sham (n = 23) procedure between the induction of general anaesthesia and the start of surgery. The minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane required to prevent neck or major limb movements in response to surgical incision was determined in each group of patients. RESULTS: The MAC for sevoflurane was found to be higher in the group given acupuncture than in the control group (2.1 +/- 0.3% vs. 1.8 +/- 0.4%; P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Electro-acupuncture given during general anaesthesia with sevoflurane failed to reduce but instead increased the clinical need for anaesthetic gas, possibly by reducing the anaesthetic effect of sevoflurane and/or by facilitating nociceptive transmission and/or reflex activity  
  Address Departments of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care and Urology, Hospital of Helsingborg, Helsingborg, and Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Malmo University Hospital, Lund University, Malmo, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Intraoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score 64  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 610  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kvorning, N.; Holmberg, C.; Grennert, L.; Aberg, A.; Akeson, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture relieves pelvic and low-back pain in late pregnancy Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand  
  Volume 83 Issue 3 Pages 246-250  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain; No Treatment Control; Pain; Pelvic Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual analog scale (VAS) evaluations of maximal and minimal pain intensity as well as three-point assessments of pain intensity during various activities. RESULTS: During the study period, VAS scorings of pain intensity decreased over time in 60% of patients in the acupuncture group and in 14% of those in the control group (p < 0.01). At the end of the study period, 43% of the acupuncture patients were less bothered than initially by pain during activity compared with 9% of control patients (p < 0.01). No serious adverse effects of acupuncture were found in the patients, and there were no adverse effects at all in the infants. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture relieves low-back and pelvic pain without serious adverse effects in late pregnancy  
  Address Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital of Helsingborg, Helsingborg, the Maternal Care Centres of Malmo University Hospital, Malmo, and Lund University Hospital, Lund, and the Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Malmo Universit  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 88  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pelvic Pain
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score 74  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 611  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kwon, Y. D.; Pittler, M. H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Rheumatology (Oxford)  
  Volume 45 Issue 11 Pages 1331-1337  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Osteoarthritis; Pain; Systematic Review  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in peripheral joint osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Systematic searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, AMED, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, PsychINFO and CAMPAIN until July 2005. Hand-searches included conference proceedings and our own files. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for patients with peripheral joint OA were considered for inclusion. Trials assessing needle acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation were considered if sham- or placebo-controlled or controlled against a comparator intervention. Trials testing other forms of acupuncture were excluded. Methodological quality was assessed and, where possible, meta-analyses were performed. Results. Thirty-one possibly relevant studies were identified and 18 RCTs were included. Ten trials tested manual acupuncture and eight trials tested electro-acupuncture. Overall, ten studies demonstrated greater pain reduction in acupuncture groups compared with controls. The meta-analysis of homogeneous data showed a significant effect of manual acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture (standardized mean difference 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.47, P = 0.04, n = 329), which is supported by data for knee OA. The extent of heterogeneity in trials of electro-acupuncture prevented a meaningful meta-analysis. Conclusions. Sham-controlled RCTs suggest specific effects of acupuncture for pain control in patients with peripheral joint OA. Considering its favourable safety profile acupuncture seems an option worthy of consideration particularly for knee OA. Further studies are required particularly for manual or electro-acupuncture in hip OA  
  Address Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, UK; Department of Rehabilitation and Acupuncture, School of Oriental Medicine, Wonkwang University, South Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 613  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lai, X. s.; Huang, Y. openurl 
  Title A Comparative Study on Acupoints of Specialty of Baihui, Shuigou and Shenmen in Treatment Vascular Dementia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 161-166  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Dementia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Psychological Disorders; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Dementia, Vascular; Mental Disorders  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 616  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lam, Y. C.; Kum, W. F.; Durairajan, S. S.; Lu, J. H.; Man, S. C.; Xu, M.; Zhang, X. F.; Huang, X. Z.; Li, M. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages 663-671  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Parkinson Disease; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy (monotherapy or adjuvant therapy), compared with placebo, conventional interventions, or no treatment in treating patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). DATA SOURCES: International electronic database: (1) The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, (2) Academic Search Premier, (3) ACP Medicine, Alternative Medicine, (4) CINAHL, (5) EBM Reviews, (6) EMBASE, (7) MEDLINE, (8) OLD MEDLINE, (9) ProQuest Medical Library. Chinese electronic databases searched included: (1) VIP, (2) CJN, (3) CBM disk, (4) China Medical Academic Conference. Hand searching was conducted on all appropriate journals. Reference lists of relevant trials and reviews were also searched to identify additional studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of any duration comparing monotherapy and adjuvant acupuncture therapy with placebo or no intervention were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were abstracted independently by Y. C. Lam and S. C. Man onto standardized forms, and disagreements were resolved by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: Ten (10) trials were included, each using a different set of acupoints and manipulation of needles. None of them reported the concealment of allocation. Only two mentioned the number of dropouts. Two (2) used a nonblind method while others did not mention their blinding methods. Nine (9) studies claimed a statistically significant positive effect from acupuncture as compared with their control; only one indicated that there were no statistically significant differences for all variables measured. Only 2 studies described details about adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence indicating the potential effectiveness of acupuncture for treating IPD. The results were limited by the methodological flaws, unknowns in concealment of allocation, number of dropouts, and blinding methods in the studies. Large, well-designed, placebo-controlled RCTs with rigorous methods of randomization and adequately concealed allocation, as well as intention-to-treat data analysis are needed  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 620  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lamontagne, Y.; Annable, L.; Gagnon, M. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for smokers: lack of long-term therapeutic effect in a controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 1980 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal CMAJ  
  Volume 122 Issue Pages 787-790  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Substance-Related Disorders; Tobacco Use Disorder; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Usual Care Control, Educational; Smoking Cessation; Substance Abuse; Drug Addiction  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 75  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 621  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lansdown, H.; Howard, K.; Brealey, S.; MacPherson, H. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: a pilot study for an open parallel-arm randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 130-  
  Keywords Osteoarthritis, Knee; Arthritis; Pilot Study; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that acupuncture for pain and osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is more than a placebo, and short term clinical benefits have been observed when acupuncture is compared to usual care. However there is insufficient evidence on whether clinical benefits of acupuncture are sustained over the longer term. In this study our key objectives are to inform the design parameters for a fully powered pragmatic randomised controlled trial. These objectives include establishing potential recruitment rates, appropriate validated outcome measures, attendance levels for acupuncture treatment, loss to follow up and the sample size for a full scale trial. METHODS: Potential participants aged over 50 with pain and osteoarthritis of the knee were identified from a GP database. Eligible patients were randomised to either 'acupuncture plus usual care' and 'usual care' alone, with allocation appropriately concealed. Acupuncture consisted of up to 10 sessions usually weekly. Outcome measures included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index with the sample size for a full scale trial determined from the variance. RESULTS: From the GP database of 15,927 patients, 335 potential trial participants were identified and invited to participate. After screening responses, 78 (23%) were identified as eligible and 30 patients who responded most promptly were randomised to 'acupuncture plus usual care' (15 patients) and 'usual care' alone (15 patients). Attendance for acupuncture appointments was high at 90% of the maximum. Although the trial was not powered to detect significant changes in outcome, the WOMAC pain index showed a statistically significant reduction at 3 months in the acupuncture group compared to usual care. This was not sustained at 12 months. The sample size for a fully powered two-arm trial was estimated to be 350. . CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study provided the evidence that a fully powered study to explore the longer term impact of acupuncture would be worthwhile, and relevant design features for such a trial were determined. Trial registration number: ISRCTN25134802  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 626  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lao, L.; Bergman, S.; Hamilton, G. R.; Langenberg, P.; Berman, B. url  openurl
  Title Evaluation of acupuncture for pain control after oral surgery: a placebo-controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg  
  Volume 125 Issue 5 Pages 567-572  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Stomatognathic Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is increasingly being used by the general population and investigated by conventional medicine; however, studies of its effects on pain still lack adequate control procedures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the (1) efficacy of Chinese acupuncture in treating postoperative oral surgery pain, (2) validity of a placebo-controlled procedure, and (3) effects of psychological factors on outcomes. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: Dental School Outpatient Clinic, University of Maryland at Baltimore. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-nine healthy subjects, aged 18 to 40 years, assigned to treatment (n=19) and control (n=20) groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' self-reports of time until moderate pain, time until medication use, total pain relief, pain half gone, and total pain medication consumption. RESULTS: Mean pain-free postoperative time was significantly longer in the acupuncture group (172.9 minutes) than in the placebo group (93.8 minutes) (P=.01), as was time until moderate pain (P=.008). Mean number of minutes before requesting pain rescue medication was significantly longer in the treatment group (242.1 minutes) than in the placebo group (166.2 minutes) (P=.01), as was time until medication use (P=.01). Average pain medication consumption was significantly less in the treatment group (1.1 tablets) than in the placebo group (1.65 tablets) (P=.05). There were no significant between-groups differences on total-pain-relief scores or pain-half-gone scores (P>.05). Nearly half or more of all patients were uncertain of or incorrect about their group assignment. Outcomes were not associated with psychological factors in multivariate models. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is superior to the placebo in preventing postoperative dental pain; noninsertion placebo procedure is valid as a control  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency N/A Number of Participants 39  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score 78  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 628  
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Author Lao, L.; Bergman, S.; Langenberg, P.; Wong, R. H.; Berman, B. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of Chinese acupuncture on postoperative oral surgery pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 1995 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 423-428  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Analgesia; AcuTrials; Facial Pain; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Tooth Extraction; Tooth, Impacted; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Stomatognathic Diseases;  
  Abstract One of the challenges of acupuncture research is designing appropriate control groups. To address this problem, after surgical third molar extractions 19 patients were randomly assigned to an acupuncture group (n = 11) or a placebo acupuncture group (n = 8). The length of time for reaching moderate pain and pain intensity after oral surgery were recorded by standard patient self-report. The results indicated that subjects treated with acupuncture reported longer pain-free duration times (mean, 181 versus 71 minutes; p < or = 0.046) and experienced less pain intensity than those who received placebo acupuncture. This study provides a model for an acupuncture control that could examine the placebo effect in clinical acupuncture research  
  Address University of Maryland at Baltimore, Department of Family Medicine 21201, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 19  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 629  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lao, L.; Hamilton, G. R.; Fu, J.; Berman, B. M. url  openurl
  Title Is acupuncture safe? A systematic review of case reports Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2003 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 72-83  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Adverse Effects; Nerve Injury; Pain; Syncope; Systematic Review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The greater acceptance of acupuncture by healthcare professionals and the public has increased the importance of addressing public concern about its safety. Of particular concern has been the potential for transmission of infectious disease and organ and tissue injury, as well as the training and professional standards of acupuncture practitioners. This paper, therefore, addresses the following question: What is the frequency and severity of adverse complications and events in acupuncture treatment? DATA SOURCES: All first-hand case reports of complications and adverse effects of acupuncture that could be identified in the English language literature were reviewed and classified according to type of complication or adverse effect, circumstances of the event, credentials of the acupuncturist, country of occurrence, and long-term patient outcome. STUDY SELECTION: The case reports were selected by a search of 9 databases and covered the years between 1965-1999. DATA EXTRACTION: Relevant papers were collected and analyzed by 2 reviewers. Over the 35 years, 202 incidents were identified in 98 relevant papers reported from 22 countries. RESULTS: Types of complications included infections (primarily hepatitis from a few practitioners), and organ, tissue, and nerve injury. Adverse effects included cutaneous disorders, hypotension, fainting, and vomiting. There is a trend toward fewer reported serious complications after 1988. CONCLUSIONS: Declines in adverse reports may suggest that recent practices, such as clean needle techniques and more rigorous acupuncturist training requirements, have reduced the risks associated with the procedure. Therefore, acupuncture performed by trained practitioners using clean needle techniques is a generally safe procedure  
  Address University of Maryland School of Medicine, Complementary Medicine Program, Baltimore, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Adverse Events/Safety
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 630  
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Author Lathia, A. T.; Jung, S. M.; Chen, L. x. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of Acupuncture as a Treatment for Chronic Shoulder Pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Osteoarthritis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Sham Control; Shoulder Pain; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for chronic shoulder pain and to compare the efficacy of individualized acupuncture to fixed, standard point acupuncture treatment. Design: The study was a single-blind randomized, controlled trial. Settings/Location: The study was conducted in an outpatient rheumatology clinic at the VA Medical Center of Philadelphia. Subjects: The participants were adults with shoulder pain for at least 8 weeks with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rotator cuff tendonitis and a total Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score of >/=30. Interventions: Thirty-one (31) subjects were randomized to one of three treatment groups: individualized acupuncture points according to the approaches of Traditional Chinese Medicine; fixed, standard acupuncture points conventionally used for shoulder pain; and sham nonpenetrating acupuncture. Subjects received 12 treatments over 6 weeks and were reassessed using the SPADI at the end of the 6 weeks. Outcome measures: The primary outcome evaluated was the mean change in total SPADI score in each group from baseline to 6 weeks. Results: After 6 weeks of treatment, the mean total SPADI score improved in all three groups, but the change was clinically significant (>/=10 points) only in groups 1 and 2 (-20.3 and -20.4, respectively, versus -6.5 in group 3). The treatment effects of groups 1 and 2 compared to the sham acupuncture group were -13.8 (95% confidence interval: -2.2 to -25.4, p < 0.015) and -13.9 (-2.0 to -25.8, p < 0.013), respectively. There was no difference between the individualized acupuncture and standardized acupuncture treatments. Conclusions: Acupuncture may be an effective treatment for chronic shoulder pain. There may be no difference in efficacy between individualized and standardized acupuncture treatment. This suggests that the use of standard points may make treatment easier for patient care and for further research studies  
  Address 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 31  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 631  
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Author Lee, A.; Done, M. url  openurl
  Title Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords TENS; Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Laser Acupuncture; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Systematic Review; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Vomiting  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are common complications following surgery and anaesthesia. Drug therapy to prevent PONV is only partially effective. An alternative approach is to stimulate a P6 acupoint on the wrist. Although there are many trials examining this technique, the results are conflicting. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of P6 acupoint stimulation in preventing PONV. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2003), MEDLINE (January 1966 to January 2003), EMBASE (January 1988 to January 2003) and the National Library of Medicine publication list of acupuncture studies up to and including January 2003. Reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews were consulted for additional references. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomized trials of techniques that stimulated the P6 acupoint compared with: sham treatment or drug therapy for the prevention of PONV. Interventions used in these trials included acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, laser stimulation, acustimulation device and acupressure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted the data. Primary outcomes were incidences of nausea and vomiting. Secondary outcomes were the need for rescue antiemetic therapy and adverse effects. A random effects model was used and relative risk (RR) with associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported. Egger's test was used to measure the asymmetry of the funnel plot. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-six trials (n = 3347) were included, none of which reported adequate allocation concealment. There were significant reductions in the risks of nausea (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.89), vomiting (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91) and the need for rescue antiemetics (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.00) in the P6 acupoint stimulation group compared with the sham treatment, although many of the trials were heterogeneous. There was no evidence of difference in the risk of nausea and vomiting in the P6 acupoint stimulation group versus individual antiemetic groups. However, when different antiemetics were pooled, there was significant reduction in the risk of nausea but not vomiting in the P6 acupoint stimulation group compared with the antiemetic group (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.98; RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.29 respectively). The side effects associated with P6 acupoint stimulation were minor. There was some evidence of asymmetry of the funnel plot. REVIEWERS' CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review supports the use of P6 acupoint stimulation in patients without antiemetic prophylaxis. Compared with antiemetic prophylaxis, P6 acupoint stimulation seems to reduce the risk of nausea but not vomiting  
  Address Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, HONG KONG  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 634  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, A.; Done, M. L. url  openurl
  Title The use of nonpharmacologic techniques to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 1999 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Curr Res Anesth Analg  
  Volume 88 Issue 6 Pages 1362-1369  
  Keywords TENS; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Meta-Analysis; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Systematic Review; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Vomiting; AcuTrials; Emesis  
  Abstract We assessed the efficacy of nonpharmacologic techniques to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) by systematic review. These studies included acupuncture, electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupoint stimulation, and acupressure. Of the 24 randomized trials retrieved by a search of articles indexed on the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1980-1997), 19 were eligible for meta-analysis. The primary outcomes were the incidence of nausea, vomiting, or both 0-6 h (early efficacy) or 0-48 h (late efficacy) after surgery. The pooled relative risk (RR) and numbers needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. In children, no benefit was found. Some results in adults were significant. Nonpharmacologic techniques were similar to antiemetics in preventing early vomiting (RR = 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.47-1.67]; NNT = 63 [10-infinity]) and late vomiting (RR = 0.80 [0.35-1.81]; NNT = 25 [5-infinity]) in adults. Nonpharmacologic techniques were better than placebo at preventing early nausea (RR = 0.34 [0.20-0.58]; NNT = 4 [3-6]) and early vomiting in adults (RR = 0.47 [0.34-0.64]; NNT = 5 [4-8]). Nonpharmacologic techniques were similar to placebo in preventing late vomiting in adults (RR = 0.81 [0.46-1.42]; NNT = 14 [6-infinity]). Using nonpharmacologic techniques, 20%-25% of adults will not have early PONV compared with placebo. It may be an alternative to receiving no treatment or first-line antiemetics. IMPLICATIONS: This systematic review showed that nonpharmacologic techniques were equivalent to commonly used antiemetic drugs in preventing vomiting after surgery. Nonpharmacologic techniques were more effective than placebo in preventing nausea and vomiting within 6 h of surgery in adults, but there was no benefit in children  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 635  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for labor pain management: A systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 191 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1579  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Epidural; Labor Pain; Pain; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Women's Health; Obstetric Labor Complications; Delivery, Obstetric, Obstetric, Obstetric; Obstetric Surgical Procedures  
  Abstract Acupuncture is widely used to alleviate symptoms in a variety of painful conditions. In obstetrics and gynecology, acupuncture has also been applied to a range of conditions including labor pain. This systematic review aims to critically evaluate the evidence on analgesic effect of acupuncture during labor. Computerized literature searches of 7 databases were performed for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture involving needle insertion for pain during labor. Three RCTs were identified and their methodologic quality was generally good. Two RCTs compared adjunctive acupuncture with usual care only and reported a reduction of meperidine and/or epidural analgesia. One placebo acupuncture controlled trial showed a statistically significant difference in both subjective and objective outcome measures of pain. No adverse events were reported in any of the trials. It is concluded that the evidence for acupuncture as an adjunct to conventional pain control during labor is promising but, because of the paucity of trial data, not convincing. Further research is warranted to clearly define its place in labor pain management  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Delivery, Obstetric
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 638  
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