toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Records Links
Author Acupuncture Research Resource Centre url  openurl
  Title Sports Injuries and Acupuncture: The Evidence for Effectiveness Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Brit Acupun  
  Volume 11 A2 Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Wounds and Injuries; Sports Medicine; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sports Medicine
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 3  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ambrosio, E. M.; Bloor, K.; MacPherson, H. url  openurl
  Title Costs and consequences of acupuncture as a treatment for chronic pain: a systematic review of economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 5 Pages 364-374  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Acupuncture; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The economic burden that chronic pain conditions impose on individuals and society is significant. Acupuncture appears to be a clinically effective treatment for some chronic pain conditions. Given the need for policy decisions to be informed by economic evaluations, the objective of this systematic review was to synthesise data from economic evaluations to determine whether acupuncture for the treatment of chronic pain conditions is good value for money. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using health and economics databases, with additional hand-searching. Economic evaluations conducted alongside randomised controlled trials were eligible. RESULTS: Eight economic evaluations were included in this review, seven cost-utility analyses and one cost-effectiveness analysis. Conditions treated included low back pain, neck pain, dysmenorrhoea, migraine and headache, and osteoarthritis. From the seven cost-utility analyses, acupuncture was found to be clinically effective but cost more. The cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained ranged from 2527 pounds to 14,976 pounds per QALY, below the commonly quoted threshold used by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence of 20,000 pounds to 30,000 pounds. The one cost-effectiveness study indicated that there might be both clinical benefits and cost savings associated with acupuncture for migraine. There was heterogeneity across the eight trials in terms of professional who provided the acupuncture, style of acupuncture, and country of origin. CONCLUSION: The cost per QALY gained in all seven cost-utility studies was found to be below typical thresholds of willingness to pay. Acupuncture appears to be a cost-effective intervention for some chronic pain conditions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, Alcuin C Block, University of York, Heslington, York Y010 5DD, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 24  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asher, G. N.; Jonas, D. E.; Coeytaux, R. R.; Reilly, A. C.; Loh, Y. L.; Motsinger-Reif, A. A.; Winham, S. J. url  openurl
  Title Auriculotherapy for pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 10 Pages 1097-1108  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Auricular Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Side-effects of standard pain medications can limit their use. Therefore, nonpharmacologic pain relief techniques such as auriculotherapy may play an important role in pain management. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating auriculotherapy for pain management. DESIGN: MEDLINE,((R)) ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Library were searched through December 2008. Randomized trials comparing auriculotherapy to sham, placebo, or standard-of-care control were included that measured outcomes of pain or medication use and were published in English. Two (2) reviewers independently assessed trial eligibility, quality, and abstracted data to a standardized form. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated for studies using a pain score or analgesic requirement as a primary outcome. RESULTS: Seventeen (17) studies met inclusion criteria (8 perioperative, 4 acute, and 5 chronic pain). Auriculotherapy was superior to controls for studies evaluating pain intensity (SMD, 1.56 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 2.26]; 8 studies). For perioperative pain, auriculotherapy reduced analgesic use (SMD, 0.54 [95% CI: 0.30, 0.77]; 5 studies). For acute pain and chronic pain, auriculotherapy reduced pain intensity (SMD for acute pain, 1.35 [95% CI: 0.08, 2.64], 2 studies; SMD for chronic pain, 1.84 [95% CI: 0.60, 3.07], 5 studies). Removal of poor quality studies did not alter the conclusions. Significant heterogeneity existed among studies of acute and chronic pain, but not perioperative pain. CONCLUSIONS: Auriculotherapy may be effective for the treatment of a variety of types of pain, especially postoperative pain. However, a more accurate estimate of the effect will require further large, well-designed trials.  
  Address Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. gasher@med.unc.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 40  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bower, W. F.; Diao, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture as a treatment for nocturnal enuresis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical Abbreviated Journal Auton Neurosci  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Nocturnal Enuresis; Urologic Diseases; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bed Wetting  
  Abstract Acupuncture can influence spinal micturition centers and parasympathetic innervation to the urinary tract and is known to modulate brain function via the descending serotonergic system. There are numerous difficulties in evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in patients with nocturnal enuresis (NE), since the patient group is frequently heterogenous and the intervention is commonly given in association with other modalities. Until recently incomplete reporting of the quality aspects of studies has also limited evaluation of treatment effects. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate reports from both Western and Eastern medicines in which acupuncture was compared to some other treatment modality in children with nocturnal enuresis. Focusing on Chinese language sources 41 new studies of acupuncture for NE were identified, 13 of which were clinical trials that reported parameters of treatment and defined outcome measures of efficacy. A standardized data extraction form was used to evaluate outcome measures and to scrutinize the quality aspects of studies. All barr one study reported the efficacy rate of acupuncture as part of a TCM package to be higher than alarm therapy, the gold standard of Western medicine intervention for NE. Acupuncture as a monotherapy for the treatment of NE appears to be less effective than acupuncture given as part of a combined Traditional Chinese Medicine approach. Electroacupuncture enhances treatment outcomes.  
  Address Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Nocturnal Enuresis
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 87  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, H.; Pan, X.; Li, H.; Liu, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for treatment of insomnia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 11 Pages 1171-1186  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Insomnia; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is commonly used in treating insomnia in China, and clinical studies have shown that acupuncture may have a beneficial effect on insomnia compared with Western medication. METHODS: We included randomized controlled trials on acupuncture for insomnia. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library (2008 Issue 3), China Network Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and Wan Fang Database. All searches ended in December 2008. Two authors extracted data and assessed the trials' quality independently. RevMan 5.0.17 software was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Forty-six (46) randomized trials involving 3811 patients were included, and the methodological quality of trials was generally fair in terms of randomization, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Meta-analyses showed a beneficial effect of acupuncture compared with no treatment (MD -3.28, 95% CI -6.10 to -0.46, p = 0.02; 4 trials) and real acupressure compared with sham acupressure (MD -2.94, 95% CI -5.77 to -0.11, p = 0.04; 2 trials) on total scores of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Acupuncture was superior to medications regarding the number of patients with total sleep duration increased for >3 hours (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.24-1.88, p < 0.0001). However, there was no difference between acupuncture and medications in average sleep duration (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.30-0.18, p = 0.63). Acupuncture plus medications showed better effect than medications alone on total sleep duration (MD 1.09, 95% CI 0.56-1.61, p < 0.0001). Similarly, acupuncture plus herbs was significantly better than herbs alone on increase of sleep rates (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.12-2.50, p = 0.01). There were no serious adverse effects with related to acupuncture treatment in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture appears to be effective in treatment of insomnia. However, further large, rigorous designed trials are warranted.  
  Address Center for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 108  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, L.; Zhang, X. L.; Gao, Y. S.; Jiang, Y. url  openurl
  Title Needle acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee. A systematic review and updated meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Saudi medical journal Abbreviated Journal Saudi Med J  
  Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 526-532  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Arthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Knee Pain; Acupuncture;  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of treatment with acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: We searched PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from July to October 2011 for randomized controlled trials that compared needle acupuncture with sham acupuncture, standard care, or waiting list control groups in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Of the 490 potentially relevant articles, 14 RCTs involving 3,835 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Two authors independently extracted outcome data on short-term and long-term pain and functional measures. RESULTS: Standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the mean differences in improvements from baseline and the associated standard deviations in patients assigned to acupuncture and those assigned to control groups according to measurement time points. Compared with sham acupuncture control treatment, acupuncture was significantly better at relieving pain (p=0.002) and restoring function (p=0.01) in the short-term period, and relieving pain (p=0.06) and restoring function (p=0.06) in the long-term. Compared with the standard care and waiting list control treatments, acupuncture was significantly better at relieving pain and restoring function. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture provided significantly better relief from knee osteoarthritis pain and a larger improvement in function than sham acupuncture, standard care treatment, or waiting for further treatment.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 112  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheuk, D.; Yeung, W.; Chung, K.; Wong, V. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for insomnia Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 3 Pages CD005472-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Insomnia; Meta-Analysis; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; AcuTrials  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although conventional non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for insomnia are effective in many people, alternative therapies such as acupuncture are still widely practiced. However, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support its use. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in people with insomnia. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Dissertation Abstracts International, CINAHL, AMED (the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), TCMLARS (Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the National Institute of Health Clinical Trials Database, the Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register, the Trials Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, from inception to 2006, and the sleep bibliography, which is available at www.websciences.org/bibliosleep. We searched reference lists of retrieved articles, and contacted trial authors and experts in the field for information on ongoing/completed trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials evaluating any form of acupuncture involving participants of any age with any type of insomnia were included. Included trials compared acupuncture with placebo or sham or no treatment, or acupuncture plus other treatments compared with the same other treatments. Trials that compared only acupuncture methods or compared acupuncture alone against other treatments alone were excluded, since they did not yield the net effect of acupuncture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality according to a set of criteria for risk of selection bias, performance bias, attrition bias and detection bias. Relative risk (RR) and standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals were used for binary and continuous outcomes respectively. Data were combined in meta-analyses (on an intention-to-treat basis), where more than one trial without significant clinical heterogeneity presented the same outcome. MAIN RESULTS: Seven trials met the inclusion criteria. The studies included 590 participants with insomnia, of whom 56 dropped out. Participant age ranged from 15 to 98 years, and the duration of insomnia varied from 6 months to 19 years. Co-existing medical conditions contributing to insomnia included stroke, end-stage renal disease and pregnancy. Apart from conventional needle acupuncture, different variants of acupuncture such as acupressure, auricular magnetic and seed therapy, and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were evaluated. Meta-analysis was limited because of considerable heterogeneity between comparison groups and between outcome measures.Based on the findings from individual trials, the review suggested that acupuncture and acupressure may help to improve sleep quality scores when compared to placebo (SMD = -1.08, 95% CI = -1.86 to -0.31, p=0.006) or no treatment (SMD -0.55, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.21, p=0.002). TEAS also resulted in better sleep quality score in one trial (SMD = -0.74, 95% CI = -1.22 to -0.26, p=0.003). However, the efficacy of acupuncture or its variants was inconsistent between studies for many sleep parameters, such as sleep onset latency, total sleep duration and wake after sleep onset. The combined result from three studies reporting subjective insomnia improvement showed that acupuncture or its variants was not more significantly effective than control (RR = 1.66, 95% CI = 0.68 to -4.03) and significant statistical heterogeneity was observed. Only one study reported an adverse event, with one out of 16 patients (6.3%) withdrawing from acupuncture because of pain. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The small number of randomised controlled trials, together with the poor methodological quality and significant clinical heterogeneity, means that the current evidence is not sufficiently extensive or rigorous to support the use of any form of acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia. Larger high quality clinical trials employing appropriate randomisation concealment and blinding with longer follow-up are needed to further investigate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 169  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S. H.; Lee, H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for pain relief in labour: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Abbreviated Journal BJOG  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Analgesia; Labor, Obstetric; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Pain; Labor Pain; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract Please cite this paper as: Cho S-H, Lee H, Ernst E. Acupuncture for pain relief in labour: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJOG 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02570.x. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is frequently used for pain relief in labour, but the evidence is not clear. OBJECTIVES: To critically evaluate the evidence for or against acupuncture for labour pain management. SEARCH STRATEGY: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving women receiving acupuncture alone, or as an adjunct to conventional analgesia, for pain relief in labour were considered. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Pain intensity on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS; 0, no pain; 100, worst pain) and use of other analgesic methods were used as primary outcomes, and for statistical pooling. Maternal/fetal outcomes were secondary outcomes, and adverse events were also recorded. Risk of bias was assessed regarding randomisation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other biases. MAIN RESULTS: Ten RCTs involving 2038 women were included. VAS for pain intensity data were available in seven studies; the meta-analysis shows that acupuncture was not superior to minimal acupuncture at 1 hour (pooled mean difference -8.02; 95% CI -21.88, 5.84; I(2) = 94%) and at 2 hours (-10.15; 95% CI -23.18, 2.87; I(2) = 92%). Patients reported significantly reduced pain by 4 and 6% during electroacupuncture (EA) treatment at 15 (-4.09; 95% CI -8.05, -0.12) and 30 minutes (-5.94; 95% CI -9.83, -2.06), compared with placebo EA, but the effect was not maintained afterwards. Compared with no intervention, acupuncture reduced pain by only 11% for the first 30 minutes (-10.56; 95% CI -16.08, -5.03). In trials where acupuncture was compared with conventional analgesia, women receiving acupuncture required less meperidine (pooled risk ratio 0.20; 95% CI 0.12, 0.33) and other analgesic methods (0.75; 95% CI 0.66, 0.85). No acupuncture-related adverse events were reported. Most trials did not blind participants, care providers and/or evaluators. AUTHOR'S CONCLUSIONS: The evidence from RCTs does not support the use of acupuncture for controlling labour pain. The primary studies are diverse and often flawed. Further research seems warranted.  
  Address Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Analgesia
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, S. H.; Whang, W. W. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Alcohol Dependence: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Acupuncture; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been used in the treatment of substance-related disorders for the past 30 years. However, a systematic review to assess the effect of various types of acupuncture for alcohol dependence has not yet been performed. The present systematic review assessed the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs of acupuncture for alcohol dependence up to June 2008 with no language restrictions. The methodological qualities of eligible studies were assessed using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook. Results: Eleven studies, which comprised a total of 1,110 individual cases, were systematically reviewed. Only 2 of 11 trials reported satisfactorily all quality criteria. Four trials comparing acupuncture treatment and sham treatments reported data for alcohol craving. Three studies reported that there were no significant differences. Among 4 trials comparing acupuncture and no acupuncture with conventional therapies, 3 reported significant reductions. No differences between acupuncture and sham treatments were found for completion rates (Risk Ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.91 to 1.25) or acupuncture and no acupuncture (Risk Ratio = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.67). Only 3 RCTs reported acupuncture-related adverse events, which were mostly minimal. Conclusions: The results of the included studies were equivocal, and the poor methodological quality and the limited number of the trials do not allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of alcohol dependence. More research and well-designed, rigorous, and large clinical trials are necessary to address these issues  
  Address From the Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 177  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Choi, T. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for cancer patients suffering from hiccups: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 6 Pages 447-455  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Hiccup; Neoplasms; Acupuncture; Cancer; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating hiccups in patients with cancer. METHOD: Thirteen databases were searched from their inception through July 2011 without language restrictions. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment or as a part of a combination therapy with conventional drugs for hiccups in cancer patients. Studies were included if they compared acupuncture to placebo, drug therapy or no treatment. Cochrane criteria were used to assess the risk of bias. RESULTS: A total of 5 RCTs met our inclusion criteria. All of the included RCTs were associated with a high risk of bias. The majority of studies suggested favourable effects of acupuncture compared with conventional treatments. A meta-analysis revealed superior response rates for acupuncture compared with intramuscular injections (n=162; RR, 1.87; 95% CI 1.26-2.78; P=0.002; heterogeneity: chi(2)=3.16, P=0. 21, I(2)=37%). CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review provides very limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture compared with the conventional therapy (intramuscular injections) for treating hiccups. The total number, as well as was the methodological quality, of the RCTs included in this review was low. Rigorous RCTs will be necessary in the future to test the efficacy of acupuncture for treating hiccups in cancer patients.  
  Address Medical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hiccup
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 183  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Choi, T. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for cancer patients suffering from hiccups: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 6 Pages 447-455  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Hiccup; Neoplasms; Acupuncture; Meta-Analysis; Cancer  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating hiccups in patients with cancer. METHOD: Thirteen databases were searched from their inception through July 2011 without language restrictions. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment or as a part of a combination therapy with conventional drugs for hiccups in cancer patients. Studies were included if they compared acupuncture to placebo, drug therapy or no treatment. Cochrane criteria were used to assess the risk of bias. RESULTS: A total of 5 RCTs met our inclusion criteria. All of the included RCTs were associated with a high risk of bias. The majority of studies suggested favourable effects of acupuncture compared with conventional treatments. A meta-analysis revealed superior response rates for acupuncture compared with intramuscular injections (n=162; RR, 1.87; 95% CI 1.26-2.78; P=0.002; heterogeneity: chi(2)=3.16, P=0. 21, I(2)=37%). CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review provides very limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture compared with the conventional therapy (intramuscular injections) for treating hiccups. The total number, as well as was the methodological quality, of the RCTs included in this review was low. Rigorous RCTs will be necessary in the future to test the efficacy of acupuncture for treating hiccups in cancer patients.  
  Address Medical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hiccup
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 184  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clark, R. J.; Tighe, M. url  openurl
  Title The effectiveness of acupuncture for plantar heel pain: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 298-306  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Foot Diseases; Fasciitis, Plantar; Acupuncture  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Plantar heel pain (PHP) is a common complaint, yet there are no definitive guidelines for its treatment. Acupuncture is increasingly used by podiatrists, and there is a need for evidence to validate this practice. It is acknowledged that PHP and acupuncture are both complex phenomena. METHOD: A systematic review (PROSPERO no. CRD42012001881) of the effectiveness of acupuncture for PHP is presented. Quality of the studies was assessed by independent assessors with reference to Quality Index (QI), 'STandards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture' (STRICTA) and 'CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials' (CONSORT) criteria. Pooling of data, or even close comparison of studies, was not performed. RESULTS: Five randomised controlled trials and three non-randomised comparative studies were included. High quality studies report significant benefits. In one, acupuncture was associated with significant improvement in pain and function when combined with standard treatment (including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). In another, acupuncture point PC7 improved pain and pressure pain threshold significantly more than LI4. Other papers were of lower quality but suggest benefits from other acupuncture approaches. CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of acupuncture for PHP. This is comparable to the evidence available for conventionally used interventions, such as stretching, night splints or dexamethasone. Therefore acupuncture should be considered in recommendations for the management of patients with PHP. Future research should recognise the complexity of PHP, of acupuncture and of the relationship between them, to explore the optimum use and integration of this approach. There is a need for more uniformity in carrying out and reporting such work and the use of STRICTA is recommended.  
  Address Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, C206 Portland Square, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK. Richard@IntegrativeHealthcare.co.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fasciitis, Plantar
  Disease Category Foot Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 197  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duan, G.; He, J.; Zeng, Z. openurl 
  Title Comparison of effects of acupuncture on cerebral infarction in different parts Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Acupunct-Moxibustion  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 3-7  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Brain Injuries; Cerebral Infarction; RCT; Scalp Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke  
  Abstract Stable cerebral infarction patients were separated into cerebral surface infarction and deep infarction on the basis of symptoms and CT scans and randomized to acupuncture and control groups (treated with usual care and drugs). There were 31 surface and 61 deep infarctions, and patients were evaluated by a national Chinese Medical Association clinical effects scale. The clinical injury score for all 92 patients dropped 12 points with acupuncture vs 6 points for controls (22-23 baseline) with 11/16 markedly improved with acupunc ture in the surface infarct group and 10/31 with deep infarction, vs 0 of 15 and 0 of 30 controls, respectively. Scalp acupuncture demonstrated definite effectiveness, but less when the infarction is deep near the ventricles and internal capsule. Acupuncture enhances cerebral blood flow and tissue metabolism, but less abundant collateral circulation is available for the region of deep infarcts. CT scans showed the superficial infarct area reduced after I month of daily acupuncture, but the deep infarct reduction was limited.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cerebral Infarction
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 264  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ernst, E.; Lee, M. S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for palliative and supportive cancer care: a systematic review of systematic reviews Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of pain and symptom management Abbreviated Journal J Pain Symptom Manage  
  Volume 40 Issue 1 Pages e3-5  
  Keywords Cancer; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Xerostomia; Pain; Adverse Effects; Prostate Cancer; Leukopenia; Acupuncture; Neoplasms; Dry Mouth  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Neoplasms
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 297  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ernst, E.; Lee, M. S.; Choi, T. Y. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in obstetrics and gynecology: an overview of systematic reviews Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 423-431  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Genital Diseases, Female; Menstruation Disturbances; Obstetric Surgical Procedures; Pregnancy Complications  
  Abstract Acupuncture is often recommended for obstetrical and gynecological conditions but the evidence is confusing. We aim to summarize all recent systematic reviews in this area. Western and Asian electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews of any type of acupuncture for any type of gynecological conditions. Our own files were hand-searched. Systematic reviews of any type of acupuncture for any type of gynecological conditions were included. Non-systematic reviews and systematic reviews published before 2004 were excluded. No language restrictions were applied. Data were extracted according to predefined criteria and analysed narratively. Twenty-four systematic reviews were included. They relate to a wide range of gynecological conditions: hot flashes, conception, dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, nausea/vomiting, breech presentation, back pain during pregnancy, and procedural pain. Nine systematic reviews arrived with clearly positive conclusions; however, there were many contradictions and caveats. The evidence for acupuncture as a treatment of obstetrical and gynecological conditions remains limited.  
  Address Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, UK. Edzard.Ernst@pms.ac.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Genital Diseases, Female
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 299  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ernst, E.; Lee, M.S.; Choi, T. Y. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Addictions: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal Focus Altern Compl Ther  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 97-100  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Acupuncture; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Substance-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 300  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fang, J. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in the Treatment of Hypertension: A Literature Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal The Amer Acupuncturist  
  Volume Issue Summer Pages 23-26  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Cardiovascular Diseases; Hypertension; AcuTrials; Acupuncture  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hypertension
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 312  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frisk, J. url  openurl
  Title Managing hot flushes in men after prostate cancer-A systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Maturitas Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume 65 Issue Pages 15-22  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Prostatic Neoplasms; Hot Flashes; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Prostate Cancer;  
  Abstract CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe hot flushes in men with prostate cancer, and their treatment methods. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted of the literature indexed between 1966 and 2009 on the MEDLINE, the ISI Web of Knowledge, Cinahl and PsycINFO. Of 252 articles identified, 32 were selected for consideration of their complete texts, of which five were subject to detailed analysis. RESULTS: Diethylstilbestrol, megestrol acetate and cyproterone acetate have the strongest effect, giving a 75% or larger decrease of the number of hot flushes, but they may have severe or bothersome side-effects. Gabapentin has an uncertain effect. Clonidine is not proven effective for hot flushes. Long-term effects were not evaluated in any of the studies. SSRI/SNRI and acupuncture may have a moderate effect on hot flushes but are not proven in any RCTs. CONCLUSION: Hot flushes are common and bothersome symptoms in men with prostate cancer and those taking anti-androgen treatment, and reduce quality of life. Few treatments are available and some are avoided for these patients. Additional prospective treatment studies are needed, with long-term follow-up, in order to evaluate the effects and risks of treatments. Treatments with few or no severe side-effects should be prioritised in future investigations. Experimental studies are also needed to elucidate the mechanism behind hot flushes in men and to suggest routes for the development of new treatments.  
  Address Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Sweden; Department of Surgery, County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 340  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frisk, J.; Kallstrom, A. C.; Wall, N.; Fredrikson, M.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in breast cancer survivors with vasomotor symptoms. METHODS: Forty-five women, randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months, were followed for up to 2 years. Distress caused by, and numbers of, hot flushes, hours slept and times woken up/night, Psychological and General Well-being Index (PGWB) and Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) were registered before and during treatment and at 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after start of treatment. RESULTS: After 12 weeks of EA (n = 19), WHQ improved from 0.32 (IQR 0.23-0.53) at baseline to 0.24 (IQR 0.12-0.39; p < 0.001) and PGWB from 78 (IQR 53-89) to 79 (IQR 68-93; p = 0.002). All sleep parameters improved and Hot Flush Score (HFS) decreased by 80%. At 12 months, WHQ, PGWB and all sleep parameters remained significantly improved (n = 14) and HFS decreased by 65%. After 12 weeks of HT (n = 18), WHQ improved from 0.29 (IQR 0.15-0.44) at baseline to 0.15 (IQR 0.05-0.22; p = 0.001), PGWB from 75 (IQR 59-88) to 90 (62-97; p = 0.102) and three of five sleep parameters improved. CONCLUSION: Both EA and HT increased HRQoL and sleep, probably through decreasing numbers of and distress by hot flushes. Although flushes decreased less in the EA group than in the HT group, HRQoL improved at least to the same extent maybe due to other effects of EA, not induced by HT, e.g. on anxiety, vitality and sleep, supported by subscale analyses. EA should be further evaluated as treatment for women with breast cancer and climacteric complaints, since HT no longer can be recommended for these women.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University, University Hospital, 581 85, Linkoping, Sweden, Jessica.frisk@liu.se.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 96 Weeks Frequency (up) Number of Participants 45  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes; Breast Neoplasms
  Disease Category Climacteric; Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 343  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Granato, A.; Chiodo Grandi, F.; Stokelj, D.; Musho, S.; Pizzolato, G. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in tension-type headache Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Neuroepidemiology Abbreviated Journal Neuroepidemiology  
  Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 160-162  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Headache Disorders; Tension-Type Headache; Acupuncture  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Tension-Type Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 390  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: