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Author Mandziuk, Kurt; Liu, Yali; Adams, Denise; Vohra, Sunita url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for cerebral palsy Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Focus on Alternative & Complementary Therapies FOCUS ALTERN COMPLEMENT THER Abbreviated Journal Focus on Alternative & Complementary Therapies  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 85-90  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Cerebral Palsy; Acupuncture  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Alberta, Canada DO – 10.1111/j.2042-7166.2012.01156.x  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Cerebral Palsy
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 815  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Manheimer, E.; Wieland, L. S.; Cheng, K.; Li, S. M.; Shen, X.; Berman, B. M.; Lao, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication The American journal of gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Am J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 107 Issue 6 Pages 835-847  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Acupuncture; IBS  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide evidence-based guidance on the effects of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous, and methodologically unsound trials. We conducted a new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to estimate the effects of acupuncture for treating IBS. METHODS: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Eligible RCTs compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment. Our outcomes were overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. Dichotomous data were pooled to provide a relative risk (RR) of substantial improvement after treatment, and continuous data were pooled to provide a standardized mean difference (SMD) in post-treatment scores between groups. RESULTS: A total of 17 RCTs (N=1,806) were included. We found no evidence of an improvement with acupuncture relative to sham acupuncture on symptom severity (SMD=-0.11, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.35 to 0.13; 4 RCTs) or quality of life (SMD=-0.03, 95% CI: -0.27 to 0.22; 3 RCTs). Because of the homogeneity of the results of the sham-controlled trials, results were unaffected by restriction to the four sham-controlled RCTs that used adequate randomization, blinding, and had few withdrawals/dropouts. Among RCTs that did not use a placebo control, acupuncture was more effective than pharmacological therapy (RR of symptom improvement=1.28, 95% CI: 1.12 to 1.45; 5 RCTs) and no (specific) treatment (RR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.18 to 3.79; 2 RCTs). There was no difference between acupuncture and Bifidobacterium (RR=1.07, 95% CI: 0.90 to 1.27; 2 RCTs) or between acupuncture and psychotherapy (RR=1.05, 95% CI: 0.87 to 1.26; 1 RCT). Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another Chinese medicine treatment was statistically significantly better than the other treatment alone, in trials with a high risk of bias (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.33; 4 RCTs). CONCLUSIONS: Sham-controlled RCTs have found no benefits of acupuncture relative to a credible sham acupuncture control on IBS symptom severity or IBS-related quality of life. In comparative effectiveness Chinese trials, patients reported greater benefits from acupuncture than from pharmacological therapies. Future trials may help clarify whether or not these reportedly greater benefits of acupuncture relative to pharmacological therapies are due entirely to patients' preferences for acupuncture or patients' greater expectations of improvement on acupuncture relative to drugs.  
  Address Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 818  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Manheimer, E.; Zhang, G.; Udoff, L.; Haramati, A.; Langenberg, P.; Berman, B. M.; Bouter, L. M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture on rates of pregnancy and live birth among women undergoing in vitro fertilisation: systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMJ  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Embryo Transfer; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; Fertilization In Vitro; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether acupuncture improves rates of pregnancy and live birth when used as an adjuvant treatment to embryo transfer in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Cochrane Central, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Database, hand searched abstracts, and reference lists. Review methods Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials that compared needle acupuncture administered within one day of embryo transfer with sham acupuncture or no adjuvant treatment, with reported outcomes of at least one of clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, or live birth. Two reviewers independently agreed on eligibility; assessed methodological quality; and extracted outcome data. For all trials, investigators contributed additional data not included in the original publication (such as live births). Meta-analyses included all randomised patients. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seven trials with 1366 women undergoing in vitro fertilisation were included in the meta-analyses. There was little clinical heterogeneity. Trials with sham acupuncture and no adjuvant treatment as controls were pooled for the primary analysis. Complementing the embryo transfer process with acupuncture was associated with significant and clinically relevant improvements in clinical pregnancy (odds ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 2.14; number needed to treat (NNT) 10 (7 to 17); seven trials), ongoing pregnancy (1.87, 1.40 to 2.49; NNT 9 (6 to 15); five trials), and live birth (1.91, 1.39 to 2.64; NNT 9 (6 to 17); four trials). Because we were unable to obtain outcome data on live births for three of the included trials, the pooled odds ratio for clinical pregnancy more accurately represents the true combined effect from these trials rather than the odds ratio for live birth. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses on study validity variables. A prespecified subgroup analysis restricted to the three trials with the higher rates of clinical pregnancy in the control group, however, suggested a smaller non-significant benefit of acupuncture (odds ratio 1.24, 0.86 to 1.77). CONCLUSIONS: Current preliminary evidence suggests that acupuncture given with embryo transfer improves rates of pregnancy and live birth among women undergoing in vitro fertilisation  
  Address Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 2200 Kernan Drive, Kernan Hospital Mansion, Baltimore, MD 21207, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 819  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mills, E. J.; Wu, P.; Gagnier, J.; Ebbert, J. O. url  openurl
  Title Efficacy of acupuncture for cocaine dependence: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal Harm Reduct J  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 4-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupuncture; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Meta-Analysis; Substance Abuse; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a commonly used treatment option for the treatment of addictions such as alcohol, nicotine and drug dependence. We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed the randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine addiction. METHODS: Two reviewers independently searched 10 databases. Unpublished studies were sought using Clinicaltrials.gov, the UK National Research Register and contacting content experts. Eligible studies enrolled patients with the diagnosis of cocaine dependence of any duration or severity randomly allocated to either acupuncture or sham or other control. We excluded studies of acupuncture methods and trials enrolling patients with polysubstance use or dependence. We abstracted data on study methodology and outcomes. We pooled the studies providing biochemical confirmation of cocaine abstinence. RESULTS: Nine studies enrolling 1747 participants met inclusion criteria; 7 provided details for biochemical confirmation of cocaine abstinence. On average, trials lost 50% of enrolled participants (range 0-63%). The pooled odds ratio estimating the effect of acupuncture on cocaine abstinence at the last reported time-point was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.45 to 1.27, P=0.30, I2=30%, Heterogeneity P=0.19). CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis does not support the use of acupuncture for the treatment of cocaine dependence. However, most trials were hampered by large loss to follow up and the strength of the inference is consequently weakened  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Substance-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 873  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ming, X.; Chen, X.; Wang, X. T.; Zhang, Z.; Kang, V.; Zimmerman-Bier, B. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for treatment of autism spectrum disorders Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2012 Issue Pages 679845-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Autistic Disorder; Mental Disorders; Acupuncture; Autism  
  Abstract Background. There has been lack of reviews of evidence on efficacy, methodology, and/or safety of acupuncture in autism spectrum disorders. This paper examines the emerging evidence of the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of autistic children. Method. A literature review was completed via Medline and three Chinese search engines. A total of 31 studies were evaluated for acupuncture methodology, study design, treatment effects, and tolerability. Results. The acupoints used, the duration of needling, the frequency of treatment, the choice of stimulation, and the course of the treatment were highly variable amongst the studies. Behavioral and/or developmental improvements were reported in all acupuncture treatment studies. All studies reported general tolerability. Weakness of experimental designs was discussed. Conclusions. Vigorously controlled double-blinded clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in children with autism spectrum disorders.  
  Address Department of Neurosciences and Neurology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, DOC 8100, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Autistic Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorder OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 875  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nastasi, R. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture as a Therapeutic Approach to Postthoracotomy Pain Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Medical Acupuncture  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 187-190  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain, Postoperative; Thoracotomy; Analgesia; Acupuncture;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 899  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author O'Dell, K. K.; McGee, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for urinary urgency in women over 50: what is the evidence? Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Urol Nurs  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 23-30  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Urgency; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urinary Incontinence; Urination Disorders; Urologic Diseases; Women's Health; Urinary Frequency  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Massachusetts, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Urinary Bladder, Overactive
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 917  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author O'Sullivan, E. M.; Higginson, I. J. url  openurl
  Title Clinical effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of irradiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 191-199  
  Keywords Neoplasms; Xerostomia; AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Cancer; Acupuncture; Hyposalivation; Dry Mouth  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Irradiation-induced xerostomia seriously reduces quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Anecdotal evidence suggests that acupuncture may be beneficial. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review evidence on clinical effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in irradiation-induced xerostomia in patients with HNC. METHODS: A detailed search was performed to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of RCTs on acupuncture in irradiation-induced xerostomia, using AMED, BNIA, CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, HPSI, PsycInfo and Medline. Grey literature was explored and 11 journals hand searched. Search terms included: acupuncture, xerostomia, salivary hypofunction, hyposalivation, dry mouth, radiotherapy, irradiation, brachytherapy, external beam. Two authors independently extracted data for analysis using predefined selection criteria and quality indicators. RESULTS: 43 of the 61 articles identified were excluded on title/abstract. 18 articles underwent full-text review; three were deemed eligible for inclusion. Two trials had moderate risk of bias; one had high risk. Two trials compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture; one control arm received 'usual care'. Outcome measurements included salivary flow rates (SFRs) in two trials and subjective questionnaires in three. All three trials reported significant reduction in xerostomia versus baseline SFR (p<0.05); one reported greater effect in the intervention group for stimulated SFR (p<0.01). Subjective assessment reported significant differences between real acupuncture and control in two trials (p<0.02-0.05). Insufficient evidence was presented to undertake risk/benefit assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture is beneficial for irradiation-induced xerostomia. Although current evidence is insufficient to recommend this intervention, it is sufficient to justify further studies. Highlighted methodological limitations must be dealt with.  
  Address Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, UCC, Wilton, Cork 9999, Ireland. eleanor.osullivan@ucc.ie  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Xerostomia
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 918  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Park, J.; Hopwood, V.; White, A. R.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture for stroke: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Neurol  
  Volume 248 Issue 7 Pages 558-563  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cerebrovascular Accident; CVA; Electroacupuncture; Stroke; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for stroke rehabilitation, but the question whether it is effective has not been answered satisfactorily. PURPOSE: To summarise and critically review all randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for stroke. METHODS: Four independent computerised literature searches (in MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Embase, and CISCOM data bases) were conducted in June 1999. All randomised-controlled trials that compared any form of needle insertion acupuncture to any form of non-acupuncture control intervention in the treatment of human stroke patients were included. Data were extracted independently by two authors and arbitrated by a third. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Jadad score. RESULTS: Nine randomised controlled trials with a total sample size of 538 patients were included. Two studies were assessor blind, one was subject blind, and one was assessor and subject blind. Two studies exclusively used manual acupuncture, five only electroacupuncture, and two used both. Outcome measures used were Scandinavian Stroke Scale, Chinese Stroke Scale or Recovery Scale, Barthel index, Nottingham Health Profile, Motor function, balance, and days in hospital. Of the nine studies, six yielded a positive result suggesting that acupuncture is effective, and three produced a negative finding implying that acupuncture is not superior to control treatment. Only two studies obtained a Jadad score of more than 3. These methodologically best trials showed no significant effect of acupuncture. CONCLUSION: Based on the evidence of rigorous randomised controlled trials, there is no compelling evidence to show that acupuncture is effective in stroke rehabilitation. Further, better-designed studies are warranted  
  Address Dept. of Complementary Medicine, School of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, UK. J.B.Park@exeter.ac.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 933  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pilkington, K.; Kirkwood, G.; Rampes, H.; Cummings, M.; Richardson, J. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for anxiety and anxiety disorders--a systematic literature review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Anxiety; Anxiety Disorders; Panic Disorder; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Mental Disorders; Auricular Acupuncture  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety and anxiety disorders by systematic review of the relevant research. METHODS: Searches of the major biomedical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ClNAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library) were conducted between February and July 2004. Specialist complementary medicine databases were also searched and efforts made to identify unpublished research. No language restrictions were imposed and translations were obtained where necessary. Study methodology was appraised and clinical commentaries obtained for studies reporting clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Twelve controlled trials were located, of which 10 were randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Four RCTs focused on acupuncture in generalised anxiety disorder or anxiety neurosis, while six focused on anxiety in the perioperative period. No studies were located on the use of acupuncture specifically for panic disorder, phobias or obsessive-compulsive disorder. In generalised anxiety disorder or anxiety neurosis, it is difficult to interpret the findings of the studies of acupuncture because of the range of interventions against which acupuncture was compared. All trials reported positive findings but the reports lacked many basic methodological details. Reporting of the studies of perioperative anxiety was generally better and the initial indications are that acupuncture, specifically auricular acupuncture, is more effective than acupuncture at sham points and may be as effective as drug therapy in this situation. The results were, however, based on subjective measures and blinding could not be guaranteed. CONCLUSIONS: Positive findings are reported for acupuncture in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder or anxiety neurosis but there is currently insufficient research evidence for firm conclusions to be drawn. No trials of acupuncture for other anxiety disorders were located. There is some limited evidence in favour of auricular acupuncture in perioperative anxiety. Overall, the promising findings indicate that further research is warranted in the form of well designed, adequately powered studies  
  Address School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster, London, UK. K.Pilkington@westminster.ac.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Anxiety Disorders
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 952  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Posadzki, P.; Zhang, J.; Lee, M. S.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for chronic nonbacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of andrology Abbreviated Journal J Androl  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 15-21  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Male; Prostatitis; Acupuncture; Nonbacterial Prostatitis;  
  Abstract The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment option for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Eight databases were searched from their inception to October 2010. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) were considered if they tested acupuncture against any control intervention or no therapy in humans with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The selection of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by 2 reviewers. The methodologic quality of all included RCTs was assessed using the Jadad scale. Studies of stimulation of acupoints other than by needles were excluded. Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. They all suggested that acupuncture is effective as a range of control interventions. Their methodologic quality was variable; most were associated with major flaws. Only one RCT had a Jadad score of more than 3. The evidence that acupuncture is effective for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is encouraging but, because of several caveats, not conclusive. Therefore, more rigorous studies seem warranted.  
  Address Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Veysey Building, Salmon Pool Line, Exeter, UK. Paul.Posadzki@pcmd.ac.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Prostatitis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Prady, S. L.; MacPherson, H. url  openurl
  Title Assessing the Utility of the Standards for Reporting Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): A Survey of Authors Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 939-944  
  Keywords Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Objective: To inform the potential revision of Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA), we sought the opinion of acupuncture trial authors and systematic reviewers to rank the utility of the guidelines and asked trial authors about their experiences using them. Design: Questionnaires ranking STRICTA items and qualitative responses about experience using the guidelines. Sample: The authors of 38 randomized controlled acupuncture trials randomly selected from a systematic search of those published in 2004 and 2005 were contacted with a questionnaire. Authors of 14 Cochrane acupuncture systematic reviews or protocols published in the same time frame were also sent a questionnaire. Results: Fifty-four percent (54%) (28/52) of the sample responded. Among the trial authors, 58% (11/19) used STRICTA to help guide their writing, but more than half of these reported that the editing process had removed some or all of the STRICTA-specific items. STRICTA was seen as a helpful reference, but authors requested that some items be clarified. Respondents tended to rank the utility of STRICTA highly overall, but five items in particular were not highly valued; three of these pertained to details on the trial acupuncturists' background. Authors flagged potential difficulties of reporting unusual trial designs in the current format of STRICTA. Conclusions: Authors of acupuncture trials and systematic reviews believe that STRICTA contributes to the reporting of acupuncture interventions and rate it highly. Because very few acupuncture studies are published in STRICTA-adopting journals, the editing process for journals unaware of the guidelines may be responsible for deleting acupuncture intervention-specific items. Several items remain unclear, and the relevance of STRICTA to some trial designs is questioned. A review of STRICTA is warranted to clarify and reconsider items, and targeted promotion to non-complementary and alternative medicine journals should be considered  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, The University of York, York, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition N/A
  Disease Category N/A OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 959  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qu, F.; Zhou, J.; Ren, R. X. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 18 Issue 5 Pages 429-439  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; In Vitro Fertilization; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; IVF; Acupuncture; Fertilization In Vitro  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: The objective of this article was to conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis of the trials of acupuncture during in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment on the outcomes of clinical pregnancy, biochemical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, implantation rate, live birth, and miscarriage. Search strategy: The search was conducted by using MEDLINE((R)), SCISEARCH, the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group trials register, AMED, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EMBASE, Wanfang Database, China Academic Journal Electronic full text Database in China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Index to Chinese Periodical Literature, ISI Proceedings for conference abstracts, and ISRCTN Register and Meta-register for randomized controlled trials. Data collection and analysis: Study selection, quality appraisal, and data extraction were performed independently and in duplicate. The measures of treatment effect were the pooled relative risks (RR) of achieving clinical pregnancy, biochemical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, implantation rate, live birth, or miscarriage for women in the acupuncture group compared with women in the control group. Results: Using the random-effects model, pooling of the effect estimates from all of the 17 trials showed no significant difference in the clinical pregnancy outcome between the acupuncture and the control groups (RR=1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-1.26, p=0.25). No significant differences in the biochemical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, implantation rate, live birth, or miscarriage outcomes were found between the acupuncture and the control groups (biochemical pregnancy: RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.84-1.20, p=0.95; ongoing pregnancy: RR=1.20, 95% CI 0.93-1.56, p=0.16; implantation rate: RR=1.22, 95% CI 0.93-1.62, p=0.16; live birth: RR=1.42, 95% CI 0.92-2.20, p=0.11; miscarriage outcomes: RR=0.94, 95% CI 0.67-1.33, p=0.74). Conclusions: No significant benefits of acupuncture are found to improve the outcomes of IVF or ICSI.  
  Address 1 Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University , Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 965  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Roberts, J.; Huissoon, A.; Dretzke, J.; Wang, D.; Hyde, C. url  openurl
  Title A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture for allergic rhinitis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 13-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Allergies; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Systematic Review; Rhinitis, Allergic;  
  Abstract ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Allergies cause a considerable burden to both sufferers and the National Health Service. There is growing interest in acupuncture as a treatment for a range of conditions. Since acupuncture may modulate the immune system it could be a useful treatment for allergic rhinitis (AR) sufferers. We therefore assessed the evidence for the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture in patients with AR by performing a systematic review of the literature. METHODS: Searches (to 2007) were conducted in all major databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of AR. No limits were placed on language. Studies were included if they compared acupuncture to a sham or inactive acupuncture treatment (placebo) with or without standard care. Meta-analysis was performed where feasible. RESULTS: Seven relevant RCTs were included after screening and application of inclusion and exclusion criteria. The trials were generally of poor quality as assessed by a modified Jadad scale, with the exception of two studies which scored highly. A wide variety of outcomes was measured but most assessed symptom severity on a visual analogue scale. A meta-analysis failed to show any summary benefits of acupuncture treatment for symptom severity scores or serum IgE measures which could not have been accounted for by chance alone. Acupuncture was not associated with any additional adverse events in the trials. CONCLUSION: There is currently insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture in patients with AR. A large well conducted RCT, which overcomes identified methodological problems in the existing RCTs, would be required to resolve this question  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 995  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rosted, P. url  openurl
  Title The use of acupuncture in dentistry: a review of the scientific validity of published papers Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Oral Dis  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 100-104  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Electroacupuncture; Facial Pain; Pain; Systematic Review; Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome; Toothache; Stomatognathic Diseases; TMD; TMJ  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the scientific validity of published papers on the efficacy of acupuncture in dentistry based on predefined methodological criteria. MATERIALS: A literature search performed by the Royal Society of Medicine and the University Library, Copenhagen, Denmark was able to identify 74 papers written in English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Italian, French and Russian published between 1966 and 1996. The search words were: acupuncture and electro-acupuncture, randomised controlled trials (RCT), dental pain, postoperative dental pain, painrelieving in dentistry, and dental analgesia. Among the 74 listed papers, 48 papers were reviewed in the following languages: English, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and German. Fifteen papers were excluded because they were written in French, Italian or Russian; 11 papers were excluded because the abstract clearly indicated the paper was not a RCT or the paper was of a general nature without relevance to acupuncture. METHODS: To assess the methodological quality of the included papers, all papers were scored on the basis of predefined criteria. A total of 92 points could be achieved and on the basis of this scale papers were rated as: Excellent (85-100%), Good (70-84%), Fair (60-69%) and Bad (< 60%). MAIN OUTCOME: Fifteen out of 48 papers met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Only one study met the criteria with more than 85%. Five studies met the criteria with 70-84%. Three studies met the criteria with 60-69%. Six studies did not meet the criteria. Acupuncture in 11 out of 15 studies proved effective in the treatment of temperomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and as analgesia. Four studies showed no effect of acupuncture. CONCLUSION: The value of acupuncture as an analgesic must be questioned. The effect of acupuncture in treating TMD and facial pain seems real and acupuncture could be a valuable alternative to orthodox treatment  
  Address Sheffield University, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Analgesia
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1001  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schneider, A.; Streitberger, K.; Joos, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture treatment in gastrointestinal diseases: A systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 13 Issue 25 Pages 3417-3424  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Constipation; Gastritis; Crohn Disease; Gastroparesis; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; IBS; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Stomach Carcinoma; Systematic Review; Colitis, Ulcerative; Pain  
  Abstract The purpose of this work was to assess the evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture (AC) treatment in gastrointestinal diseases. A systematic review of the Medline-cited literature for clinical trials was performed up to May 2006. Controlled trials assessing acupuncture point stimulation for patients with gastrointestinal diseases were considered for inclusion. The search identified 18 relevant trials meeting the inclusion criteria. Two irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) trials, 1 Crohn's disease and 1 colitis ulcerosa trial had a robust random controlled trial (RCT) design. In regard to other gastrointestinal disorders, study quality was poor. In all trials, quality of life (QoL) improved significantly independently from the kind of acupuncture, real or sham. Real AC was significantly superior to sham acupuncture with regard to disease activity scores in the Crohn and Colitis trials. Efficacy of acupuncture related to QoL in IBS may be explained by unspecific effects. This is the same for QoL in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), whereas specific acupuncture effects may be found in clinical scores. Further trials for IBDs and in particular for all other gastrointestinal disorders would be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture treatment. However, it must be discussed on what terms patients benefit when this harmless and obviously powerful therapy with regard to QoL is demystified by further placebo controlled trials  
  Address Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Medical Hospital Heidelberg, Vobetastrasse 2, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. antonius.schneider@med.uni-heidelberg.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Gastrointestinal Diseases
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1024  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schroer, S.; Adamson, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Depression: A Critique of the Evidence Base. LID – 10.1111/j.1755-5949.2010.00159.x [doi] Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication CNS neuroscience & therapeutics Abbreviated Journal CNS Neurosci Ther  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract Aim: The aim of this review is to examine the evidence for acupuncture's effectiveness as a depression intervention. Unlike other reviews, which consider methodological concerns relevant to all experimental evaluations, this review focuses on the scope of studies, and uses a PICO (patients, intervention, comparison, and outcome) structure to determine what can potentially be learned from primary studies that have already been screened for methodological quality by reviewers. Discussion: The review identified a number of study limitations. (i) Patients: majority of trial reports have not described a rationale for the selection of patients or inclusion/exclusion criteria. Prognostic indicators were not reported and there were also concerns about the generalizability of study populations. (ii) Intervention: most trials investigate poorly rationalized standardized acupuncture protocols thus quality of care may be an issue and generalizability to routine clinical practice is a main concern. In trials using other methods generalizability is also poor. (iii) Comparisons: concerns were raised about using therapeutically inappropriate acupuncture. (iv) Outcomes: short-term focus and the narrow range of outcomes explored. According to more recent systematic review evidence it is probable the shortcomings identified in the PICO review have not been addressed by subsequent research. The concept of model validity, proposed by other researchers, is discussed, and suggestions put forward about complex intervention evaluation methods, which may be better suited to evaluating acupuncture care. Conclusion: Uncertainty remains about the value of acupuncture care, as it is routinely practiced in the West, and this uncertainty has not been resolved by trials to date. Existing evaluations may however be useful for guiding decisions about the value of specific techniques for patients with depression.  
  Address Health Sciences Department, ARRC Building, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1025  
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Author Shin, B. C.; Lee, M. S.; Kong, J. C.; Jang, I.; Park, J. J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for spinal cord injury survivors in Chinese literature: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 5-6 Pages 316-327  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Wounds and Injuries; Spinal Cord Injuries; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE(S): To systematically review Chinese literature on the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). DATA SOURCES: The Chinese electronic databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched from their inceptions to May 2008. STUDY SELECTION: Trials reporting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where patients with SCI (with or without operation) were treated with acupuncture including electroacupuncture. DATA EXTRACTION: Methodological quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. Discrepancies were resolved through discussions and arbitration by two co-authors. RESULTS: The searches identified 236 potentially relevant studies, of which 7 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Five studies assessed functional recovery, and two bladder dysfunction. All the studies reported favourable effects of acupuncture on functional recovery or urinary function; however methodological quality of studies is poor in general. Meanwhile, pooled analysis of two trials assessing bladder dysfunction showed positive effectiveness compared with conventional treatment (n = 128, RR 1.51 [1.21, 1.90], P = 0.0004, heterogeneity Tau(2) &lt; 0.01, Chi(2) = 0.01, P = 0.94, I(2) = 0%). CONCLUSION(S): Based on 7 RCTs done in China, the effectiveness of acupuncture for functional recovery and bladder dysfunction in SCI is suggestive. With the methodological quality of the included studies on functional recovery and the small number of studies on bladder dysfunction taken into consideration, further rigorous studies prove needed.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Spinal Cord Injuries
  Disease Category Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1048  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sim, H.; Shin, B. C.; Lee, M. S.; Jung, A.; Lee, H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; Acupuncture; Wrist Pain  
  Abstract Acupuncture is a widely used symptomatic treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-like treatments for CTS. Systematic searches were conducted on 11 electronic databases without language restrictions. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture as a treatment of CTS were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Six RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was generally low. Two RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture with a sham control. The others used active controls. A meta-analysis of acupuncture versus steroid block therapy favored acupuncture (2 studies, n = 144; risk ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.52; P = .005; heterogeneity, I(2) = 10%) in terms of responder rate. Our systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrate that the evidence for acupuncture as a symptomatic therapy of CTS is encouraging but not convincing. The total number of included RCTs and their methodological quality were low. Further rigorous studies are required to establish whether acupuncture has therapeutic value for this indication. PERSPECTIVE: This systematic review of RCTs focused on clinical trials testing the effectiveness of acupuncture for CTS. The existing evidence is not convincing enough to suggest that acupuncture is an effective therapy for CTS. Further RCTs should overcome the limitation of previous studies.  
  Address School of Korean Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1055  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, C. A.; Carmady, B. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture to treat common reproductive health complaints: An overview of the evidence Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical Abbreviated Journal Auton Neurosci  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Acupuncture; Women's Health; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Women specific health complaints are common, and women are higher users of complementary therapies and medicines. Acupuncture is one modality used by women. The aim of this paper was to summarise the evidence from scientific trials and systematic reviews assessing the effectiveness of acupuncture to treat the most common women specific reproductive health complaints. METHODS: We conducted a search of the major databases PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to Sept 2009, to obtain English language texts of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews. The following English Australian search terms were used: acupuncture and period pain or dysmenorrhea, or premenstrual syndrome, or poly cystic ovarian syndrome/PCOS, or menstrual headache, or irregular periods/menstruation, or amenorrhea, or heavy menses/periods, or menorrhagia, or menopause, and randomised controlled trial and systematic review. Both authors extracted data and reviewed each trial and systematic review for methodological quality. RESULTS: Five systematic reviews were included, and six RCTs. The symptoms of the menopause and dysmenorrhea have been subject to greater clinical evaluation through RCTs, and the evidence summarised in systematic reviews, than any other reproductive health complaint. The evidence for acupuncture to treat dysmenorrhea and menopause remains unclear, due to small study populations and the presence of methodological bias. Acupuncture to treat PMS, PCOS and other menstrual related symptoms is under-studied, and the evidence for acupuncture to treat these conditions is frequently based on single studies. CONCLUSION: Further research is needed.  
  Address Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, The University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South, NSW 1797, Australia.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Infertility, Female
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1062  
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