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Author Smith, C. A.; Zhu, X.; He, L.; Song, J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 1 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Acupressure; Acupuncture; Cramping; Fatigue; Women's Health; Pain;  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of acupuncture to treat primary dysmenorrhoea. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with a placebo, no treatment, or conventional medical treatment (for example oral contraceptives and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (NSAIDs)). SEARCH STRATEGY: The following databases were searched (from inception until March 2010): the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertillity Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP database, Dissertation Abstracts International, BIOSIS, AMED (The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), Acubriefs, and Acubase. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture with placebo control, usual care, and pharmacological treatment. The following modes of treatment were included: acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and acupressure. Participants were women of reproductive age with primary dysmenorrhoea during the majority of the menstrual cycles or for three consecutive menstrual cycles, and moderate to severe symptoms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Meta-analyses were performed using odds ratios (OR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences or standard mean differences (SMD) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Primary outcomes were pain relief and improved menstrual symptoms, measured by self-rating scales. Other outcomes included use of analgesics, quality of life, and absence from school or work. MAIN RESULTS: Ten trials were included in the review with data reporting on 944 participants. Six trials reported on acupuncture (n = 673) and four trials (n = 271) reported on acupressure. There was an improvement in pain relief from acupuncture compared with a placebo control (OR 9.5, 95% CI 21.17 to 51.8), NSAIDs (SMD -0.70, 95% CI -1.08 to -0.32) and Chinese herbs (SMD -1.34, 95% CI -1.74 to -0.95). In two trials acupuncture reduced menstrual symptoms (for example nausea, back pain) compared with medication (OR 3.25, 95% CI 1.53 to 6.86); in one trial acupuncture reduced menstrual symptoms compared with Chinese herbs (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.22, 22.06); and in one trial acupuncture improved quality of life compared with usual care.There was an improvement in pain relief from acupressure compared with a placebo control (SMD -0.99, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.49), and in one trial acupressure reduced menstrual symptoms compared with a placebo control (SMD -0.58, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.10). The risk of bias was low in 50% of trials. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may reduce period pain, however there is a need for further well-designed randomised controlled trials.  
  Address Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, The University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, New South Wales, Australia, 2751.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmennorhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1069  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sok, S. R.; Erlen, J. A.; Kim, K. B. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture therapy on insomnia Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Adv Nurs  
  Volume 44 Issue 4 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Geriatrics; Insomnia; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Quality; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture therapy, commonly used in clinical practice in oriental cultures, has the potential to produce a positive effect with patients experiencing insomnia. AIM: The purposes of this systematic review were: (1) to assess the trends across intervention studies using acupuncture for insomnia from 1975 to 2002, (2) to examine dependent variables, and (3) to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy on insomnia in older people. METHOD: Data were collected from November 2001 to January 2003. A wide range of electronic databases was searched using the keywords 'insomnia', 'acupuncture' and 'experimental design'. Papers were included if they were published in the English language between 1975 and 2002 and described an experimental study using acupuncture therapy to treat insomnia. Eleven reports met these criteria. FINDINGS: Most of the studies had been conducted since 1990. The findings showed that the first author was usually a Chinese medical doctor (n = 9) employed in a traditional department of medicine. Most of the papers were published in two journals: International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Data were limited because of the small number of studies available. Half the studies had small samples (50 subjects or fewer), which were composed mainly of older women who had a variable duration of insomnia from 3 days to 34 years. The main method used to assess outcomes was questionnaire. All the studies reported statistically significant positive results. CONCLUSION: The results of this review suggest that acupuncture may be an effective intervention for the relief of insomnia. Further research, using a randomized clinical trial design, are necessary to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture. More work is also needed to promote the long-term therapeutic effects of acupuncture and to compare it with other therapies for insomnia  
  Address Postdoctoral Student, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Insomnia
  Disease Category Systematic Review OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1087  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sood, A.; Sood, R.; Bauer, B. A.; Ebbert, J. O. url  openurl
  Title Cochrane systematic reviews in acupuncture: methodological diversity in database searching Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages 719-722  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Pain; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Low Back Pain; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract Background: Since the early 1970s, the efficacy of acupuncture for treating clinical conditions has been evaluated in several hundred randomized trials. Results from these trials have been synthesized in systematic reviews. A well-designed systematic review provides the highest level of evidence for establishing the efficacy of a clinical intervention. Objectives: The present study assesses the source of original literature contributing to Cochrane reviews on acupuncture. Databases searched to retrieve original studies are evaluated. The distribution of controlled trials in acupuncture across different topic areas and journals, the ability of the reviews to provide conclusive results, and the proportion of original studies indexed with MEDLINE((R)) are evaluated. Methods: Systematic reviews on acupuncture were extracted from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The key search term used was “acupuncture.” When more than one systematic review was retrieved on the same topic, the most recent review was included. Indexing of individual clinical trials with MEDLINE was searched using the Single Citation Matcher in PubMed. Results: A total of 94 papers were retrieved from the Cochrane database, of which 10 were included in the analysis. The most common subject areas were related to chronic pain. Considerable heterogeneity was observed in the number of databases searched (median 5, range 3-12). A total of 69% (74/108) papers were indexed with PubMed. Only 13% (14/108) of the papers were published in the primary acupuncture journals. Conclusive statements about the efficacy of acupuncture were made in only 2 of the 10 systematic reviews. Conclusions: Considerable methodological diversity exists in the comprehensiveness of database searches for Cochrane systematic reviews on acupuncture. This diversity makes the reviews prone to bias and adds another layer of complexity in interpreting the acupuncture literature  
  Address Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN., Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1095  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Standaert, C. J.; Friedly, J.; Erwin, M. W.; Lee, M. J.; Rechtine, G.; Henrikson, N. B.; Norvell, D. C. url  openurl
  Title Comparative effectiveness of exercise, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation for low back pain Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2011 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 36 Issue 21 Suppl Pages S120-30  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Pain; Acupuncture; Exercise; Spinal Manipulation  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. OBJECTIVE: We sought to answer the following clinical questions: (1) Is structured exercise more effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP) than spinal manipulative therapy (SMT)? (2) Is structured exercise more effective in the treatment of chronic LBP than acupuncture? (3) Is SMT more effective in the treatment of chronic LBP than acupuncture? (4) Do certain subgroups respond more favorably to specific treatments? (5) Are any of these treatments more cost-effective than the others? SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Exercise, SMT, and acupuncture are widely used interventions in the treatment of chronic LBP. There is evidence that all of these approaches may offer some benefit for patients with chronic LBP when compared with usual care or no treatment. The relative benefits or cost-effectiveness of any one of these treatments when compared with the others are less well-defined, and it is difficult to identify specific subgroups of those with chronic LBP who may preferentially respond to a particular treatment modality. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify randomized controlled trials comparing a structured exercise program, SMT, or acupuncture with one another in patients with chronic LBP. RESULTS: Two studies were identified comparing the use of structured exercise with SMT that met our inclusion criteria. Although these studies utilized different approaches for the exercise and SMT treatment groups, patients in both groups improved in terms of pain and function in both studies. Using random-effects modeling, there was no difference between the exercise and SMT groups when the data from these studies were pooled. We identified no studies meeting our inclusion criteria that compared acupuncture with either structured exercise or SMT or that addressed the relative cost-effectiveness of these approaches in the treatment of patients with chronic LBP. CONCLUSION: The studies identified indicate that structured exercise and SMT appear to offer equivalent benefits in terms of pain and functional improvement for those with chronic LBP with clinical benefits evident within 8 weeks of care. However, the level of evidence is low. There is insufficient evidence to comment on the relative benefit of acupuncture compared with either structured exercise or SMT or to address the differential effects of structured exercise, SMT, or acupuncture for specific subgroups of individuals with chronic LBP. There is also insufficient evidence regarding the relative cost-effectiveness of structured exercise, SMT, or acupuncture in the treatment of chronic LBP. CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS: Structured exercise and SMT appear to offer equivalent benefits in the management of pain and function for patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. If no clinical benefit is appreciated after using one of these approaches for 8 weeks, then the treatment plan should be reevaluated and consideration should be given to modifying the treatment approach or using alternate forms of care. Strength of recommendation: Weak.There is insufficient evidence regarding the relative benefits of the acupuncture compared with either structured exercise or SMT in the treatment of chronic LBP.There is insufficient evidence to address differential effects of structured exercise, SMT, or acupuncture for specific subgroups of individuals with chronic LBP. There is insufficient evidence regarding the relative cost-effectiveness of structured exercise, SMT, or acupuncture in the treatment of chronic LBP.  
  Address Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. cjs1@uw.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1097  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Standish, L. J.; Kozak, L.; Congdon, S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture Is Underutilized in Hospice and Palliative Medicine Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11 JA - Am J Hosp.P  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Cancer; Dyspnea; Nausea; Pain; Palliative Care; Systematic Review; Vomiting; Xerostomia; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Dry Mouth  
  Abstract Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medical modality. A considerable body of acupuncture research has accumulated since 1998. Acupuncture has been integrated into palliative care settings in the United Kingdom but is yet to be widely offered in the United States. The literature was searched to identify clinical trials involving acupuncture, palliative care, hospice, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bone marrow, and cancer. Twenty-seven randomized controlled clinical trials of acupuncture were found that reported on conditions common to the hospice and palliative care setting, including dyspnea, nausea and vomiting, pain, and xerostomia, and 23 reported statistically significant results favoring acupuncture use for the conditions investigated. Acupuncture is safe and clinically cost-effective for management of common symptoms in palliative care and hospice patients. Acupuncture has potential as adjunctive care in palliative and end-of-life care, and the evidence warrants its inclusion in reimbursed palliative and end-of-life care in the United States  
  Address Bastyr University  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hospice Care
  Disease Category Acupuncture Utilization OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1098  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stener-Victorin, E.; Jedel, E.; Manneras, L. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Current Experimental and Clinical Evidence Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Genital Diseases, Female; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract This review describes the aetiology and pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and evaluates the use of acupuncture to prevent and reduce symptoms related with PCOS. PCOS is the most common female endocrine disorder and it is strongly associated with hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction and obesity. PCOS increases the risk for metabolic disturbances such as hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and an increase of developing cardiovascular risk factors and impaired mental health later in life. Despite extensive research, little is known about the aetiology of PCOS. The syndrome is associated with peripheral and central factors that influence sympathetic nerve activity. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system may be an important factor in the development and maintenance of PCOS. Many women with PCOS require prolonged treatment. Current pharmacological approaches are effective but have adverse effects. Therefore, non-pharmacological treatment strategies need to be evaluated. Clearly, acupuncture can affect PCOS via modulation of endogenous regulatory systems, including the sympathetic nervous system, the endocrine and the neuroendocrine system. Experimental observations in rat models of steroid-induced polycystic ovaries and clinical data from studies in women with PCOS suggest that acupuncture exert long-lasting beneficial effects on metabolic and endocrine systems and ovulation  
  Address Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Goteborg University, Sweden; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1107  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sui, Y.; Zhao, H. L.; Wong, V. C.; Brown, N.; Li, X. L.; Kwan, A. K.; Hui, H. L.; Ziea, E. T.; Chan, J. C. url  openurl
  Title A systematic review on use of Chinese medicine and acupuncture for treatment of obesity Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity Abbreviated Journal Obes Rev  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; Obesity; Herbal Formula; Acupuncture; Weight Loss  
  Abstract Obesity is a major health hazard and despite lifestyle modification, many patients frequently regain any lost body weight. The use of western anti-obesity drugs has been limited by side effects including mood changes, suicidal thoughts, and gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications. The effectiveness and safety of traditional Chinese medicine including Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) and acupuncture provide an alternative established therapy for this medical challenge. In this systematic review, we used standard methodologies to search, review, analyse and synthesize published data on the efficacy, safety and relapse of weight regain associated with use of CHM and acupuncture. We also examined the rationale, mechanisms and potential utility of these therapies. A total of 12 electronic databases, including Chinese, English, Korean and Japanese, were searched up to 28 February 2010. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for CHM and/or acupuncture with comparative controls were considered. We used the Jadad scale to assess methodological qualities, the random effect model in the pooled analysis of therapeutic efficacy to adjust for heterogeneity and funnel plots to explore publication bias. After screening 2,545 potential articles from the electronic databases, we identified 96 RCTs; comprising of 49 trials on CHM treatment, 44 trials on acupuncture treatment and 3 trials on combined therapy for appraisal. There were 4,861 subjects in the treatment groups and 3,821 in the control groups, with treatment duration ranging from 2 weeks to 4 months. Of the 77 publications written in Chinese, 75 had a Jadad score <3, while 16 of the 19 English publications had a Jadad score of >3. Efficacy was defined as body weight reduction >/=2 kg or body mass index (BMI) reduction >/=0.5 kg/m(2) . Compared with placebo or lifestyle modification, CHM and acupuncture exhibited respective 'risk ratio' (RR) of 1.84 (95% CI: 1.37-2.46) and 2.14 (95% CI: 1.58-2.90) in favour of body weight reduction, with a mean difference in body weight reduction of 4.03 kg (95% CI: 2.22-5.85) and 2.76 kg (95% CI: 1.61-3.83) and a mean difference in BMI reduction of 1.32 kg m(-2) (95% CI: 0.78-1.85) and 2.02 kg m(-2) (95% CI: 0.94-3.10), respectively. Compared with the pharmacological treatments of sibutramine, fenfluramine or orlistat, CHM and acupuncture exhibited an RR of 1.11 (95% CI: 0.96-1.28) and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03-1.25) in body weight reduction, mean difference in body weight reduction of 0.08 kg (95% CI: -0.58 to 0.74) and 0.65 kg (95% CI: -0.61 to 1.91), and mean difference in BMI reduction of 0.18 kg m(-2) (95% CI: -0.39 to 0.75) and 0.83 kg m(-2) (95% CI: 0.29-1.37), respectively. There were fewer reports of adverse effects and relapses of weight regain in CHM intervention studies conducted in China than studies conducted outside China. CHM and acupuncture were more effective than placebo or lifestyle modification in reducing body weight. They had a similar efficacy as the Western anti-obesity drugs but with fewer reported adverse effects. However, these conclusions were limited by small sample size and low quality of methodologies.  
  Address Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital; The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Obesity
  Disease Category Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1116  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sun, Y.; Gan, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for the management of chronic headache: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Curr Res Anesth Analg  
  Volume 107 Issue 6 PB - Internationa Pages 2038-2047  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Headache Disorders; Migraine; Systematic Review; Tension-Type Headache;  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of chronic headache. METHODS: We searched the databases of Medline (1966-2007), CINAHL, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2006), and Scopus for randomized controlled trials investigating the use of acupuncture for chronic headache. Studies were included in which adults with chronic headache, including migraine, tension-type headache or both, were randomized to receive needling acupuncture treatment or control consisting of sham acupuncture, medication therapy, and other nonpharmacological treatments. We extracted the data on headache intensity, headache frequency, and response rate assessed at early and late follow-up periods. RESULTS: Thirty-one studies were included in this review. The majority of included trials comparing true acupuncture and sham acupuncture showed a trend in favor of acupuncture. The combined response rate in the acupuncture group was significantly higher compared with sham acupuncture either at the early follow-up period (risk ratio [RR]: 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08, 1.30) or late follow-up period (RR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.43). Combined data also showed acupuncture was superior to medication therapy for headache intensity (weighted mean difference: -8.54 mm, 95% CI: -15.52, -1.57), headache frequency (standard mean difference: -0.70, 95% CI: -1.38, -0.02), physical function (weighted mean difference: 4.16, 95% CI: 1.33, 6.98), and response rate (RR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.17). CONCLUSION: Needling acupuncture is superior to sham acupuncture and medication therapy in improving headache intensity, frequency, and response rate  
  Address Duke University Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Box 3094, Durham, NC 27710, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sun, Y.; Gan, T. J.; Dubose, J. W.; Habib, A. S. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Br J Anaesth  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Anesthesia; Pain; Pain, Postoperative; Systematic Review  
  Abstract Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. The objective of this systematic review was to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and related techniques as adjunct analgesics for acute postoperative pain management. We searched the databases of Medline (1966-2007), CINAHL, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2006), and Scopus for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using acupuncture for postoperative pain management. We extracted data about postoperative opioid consumption, postoperative pain intensity, and opioid-related side-effects. Combined data were analysed using a random effects model. Fifteen RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham control in the management of acute postoperative pain were included. Weighted mean difference for cumulative opioid analgesic consumption was -3.14 mg (95% confidence interval, CI: -5.15, -1.14), -8.33 mg (95% CI: -11.06, -5.61), and -9.14 mg (95% CI: -16.07, -2.22) at 8, 24, and 72 h, respectively. Postoperative pain intensity (visual analogue scale, 0-100 mm) was also significantly decreased in the acupuncture group at 8 and 72 h compared with the control group. The acupuncture treatment group was associated with a lower incidence of opioid-related side-effects such as nausea (relative risk, RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.86), dizziness (RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.81), sedation (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.99), pruritus (RR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.96), and urinary retention (RR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.74). Perioperative acupuncture may be a useful adjunct for acute postoperative pain management  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3094, Durham, NC 27710, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Postoperative Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1132  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sunkara, S. K.; Coomarasamy, A.; Khalaf, Y.; El-Toukhy, T. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture and in vitro fertilization: updated meta-analysis 1 Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Hum Reprod  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-2  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Infertility, Female; In Vitro Fertilization; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Acupuncture; IVF; Fertilization In Vitro  
  Abstract  
  Address Assisted Conception Unit, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1136  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sze, F. K.; Wong, E.; Or, K. K.; Lau, J.; Woo, J. url  openurl
  Title Does acupuncture improve motor recovery after stroke? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Stroke  
  Volume 33 Issue 11 Pages 2604-2619  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cerebrovascular Accident; Meta-Analysis; Motor Function; Stroke; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acupuncture may be a promising treatment for poststroke paralysis. We conducted a meta-analysis, assessing the efficacy of acupuncture with and without stroke rehabilitation. METHODS: We identified randomized trials comparing acupuncture with no acupuncture within 6 months of stroke by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Chinese medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and impairment and disability outcomes. The outcome measures were internationally recognized or nationally approved. The fixed- and random-effects models were used to combine effect size and odds ratio across studies. RESULTS: Fourteen trials with 1213 patients met all the inclusion criteria. For the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture in addition to stroke rehabilitation, the pooled random-effects estimates of the change in motor impairment and disability were 0.06 (95% CI, -0.12 to 0.24) and 0.49 (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.96), respectively, with heterogeneity in disability measures (P=0.05, chi(2) test). For the comparison of real with sham acupuncture, the pooled random-effects estimate of the change in disability was 0.07 (95% CI, -0.34 to 0.48). For the comparison of acupuncture with no acupuncture without stroke rehabilitation, the pooled random-effects estimate of the change in motor impairment was 0.46 (95% CI, -0.20 to 1.12), and the pooled random-effects odds ratio for disability was 12.5 (95% CI, 4.3 to 36.2), with no statistically significant heterogeneity (P=0.97 and P=0.12, respectively, chi(2) test), but the study quality was poor. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that with stroke rehabilitation, acupuncture has no additional effect on motor recovery but has a small positive effect on disability, which may be due to a true placebo effect and varied study quality. The efficacy of acupuncture without stroke rehabilitation remains uncertain, mainly because of the poor quality of such studies  
  Address Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Shatin Hospital, N.T. Hong Kong. fkhsze@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1140  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, L.H.; Cross, S.; Barrett, J.; French, B.; Leathley, M.; Sutton, C.J.; Watkins, C. openurl 
  Title Treatment of urinary incontinence after stroke in adults (review) Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 1 Pages i-39  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Urinary Incontinence; Urologic Diseases; Stroke; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Urinary Incontinence
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1159  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Trigkilidas, D. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture therapy for chronic lower back pain: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England Abbreviated Journal Ann R Coll Surg Engl  
  Volume 92 Issue Pages 595-598  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Acupuncture; Low Back Pain  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION Chronic low back pain is a common condition affecting a significant proportion of the population and has large economic implications on the society. Acupuncture has grown in popularity as an alternative therapy for chronic low back pain. Recent National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on low back pain offer a course of acupunctureas a baseline treatment option according to patient preference. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate if this treatment option is justified in view of recent evidence available on the efficacy of acupuncture.MATERIALS AND METHODS Studies included were identified by a PubMed search for relevant, randomised, controlled trials on the 23 July 2009. A systematic review was performed. RESULTS Fifteen randomised controlled trials were identified. Of these, four met the eligibility criteria and were critically appraised. These trials suggest acupuncture can be superior to usual care in treating chronic low back pain, especially, when patients have positive expectations about acupuncture.CONCLUSIONS NICE guidelines of a course of acupuncture, offered according to patient preference as a treatment option for chronic low back pain, are justified.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1178  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vas, J.; White, A. url  openurl
  Title Evidence from RCTs on optimal acupuncture treatment for knee osteoarthritis--an exploratory review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 1-2 Pages 29-35  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Back Pain; Electroacupuncture; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; Systematic Review;  
  Abstract There are many differing opinions on what constitutes an optimal acupuncture dose for treating any particular patient with any particular condition, and only direct comparisons of different methods in a clinical trial will provide information on which reliable decisions can be made. This article reviews the recent research into acupuncture treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee, to explore whether any aspects of treatment seem more likely to be associated with good outcome of treatment. Among four recent, high quality RCTs, one showed a much greater treatment response than the other three, and the possible factors are discussed. A recent systematic review included 13 RCTs, and this article discusses the possible explanations for differences in their outcomes. It is speculated that optimal results from acupuncture treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee may involve: climatic factors, particularly high temperature; high expectations of patients; minimum of four needles; electroacupuncture rather than manual acupuncture, and particularly, strong electrical stimulation to needles placed in muscle; and a course of at least 10 treatments. These factors offer some support to criteria for adequate acupuncture used in the recent review. In addition, ethnic and cultural factors may influence patients' reporting of their symptoms, and different versions of an outcome measure are likely to differ in their sensitivity – both factors which may lead to apparent rather than real differences between studies. The many variables in a study are likely to be more tightly controlled in a single centre study than in multicentre studies  
  Address Pain Treatment Unit, Dos Hermanas, Sevilla, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1206  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vickers, A. J. openurl 
  Title P6 Acupuncture point stimulation as an anti-emetic therapy: A review of the research literature Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year Publication Abbreviated Journal Research Council for Complementary Medicine  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Emesis; Nausea; Systematic Review; Vomiting; AcuTrials  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1211  
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Author Vickers, A. J.; Cronin, A. M.; Maschino, A. C.; Lewith, G.; Macpherson, H.; Foster, N. E.; Sherman, K. J.; Witt, C. M.; Linde, K.; CN , -. for the Acupuncture Trialists' Collaboration. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Chronic Pain: Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Acupuncture;  
  Abstract BACKGROUND Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for 4 chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain. METHODS We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for chronic pain in which allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible RCTs, with a total of 17 922 patients analyzed. RESULTS In the primary analysis, including all eligible RCTs, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no-acupuncture control for each pain condition (P &lt; .001 for all comparisons). After exclusion of an outlying set of RCTs that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores that were 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13-0.33), 0.16 (95% CI, 0.07-0.25), and 0.15 (95% CI, 0.07-0.24) SDs lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache, respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no-acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.51-0.58), 0.57 (95% CI, 0.50-0.64), and 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.46) SDs. These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias. CONCLUSIONS Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture.  
  Address  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1213  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vickers, A. J.; Cronin, A. M.; Maschino, A. C.; Lewith, G.; Macpherson, H.; Victor, N.; Sherman, K. J.; Witt, C.; Linde, K. openurl 
  Title Individual patient data meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic pain: protocol of the acupuncture trialists' collaboration Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2010 Publication Abbreviated Journal Trials  
  Volume 11 Issue 90 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Pain; Back Pain; Neck Pain; Osteoarthritis; Shoulder Pain; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for 4 chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain. METHODS We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for chronic pain in which allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible RCTs, with a total of 17 922 patients analyzed. RESULTS In the primary analysis, including all eligible RCTs, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no-acupuncture control for each pain condition (P < .001 for all comparisons). After exclusion of an outlying set of RCTs that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores that were 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13-0.33), 0.16 (95% CI, 0.07-0.25), and 0.15 (95% CI, 0.07-0.24) SDs lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache, respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no-acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.51-0.58), 0.57 (95% CI, 0.50-0.64), and 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.46) SDs. These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias. CONCLUSIONS Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1214  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, K. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observations of Treatement of 89 Adhesive Capsulitis Cases with Ear Pressing and Warming Acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Intl J Clin Acu  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 169-191  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Ear Seeds; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Shoulder Pain; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; AcuTrials; Pain; Adhesive Capsulitis;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, Q.P.; Bai, M.; Lei, D. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture in Treatment of Facial Spasm: A Meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2012 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine Abbreviated Journal Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine  
  Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 45-52  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stomatognathic Diseases; Hemifacial Spasm; Meta-Analysis; Facial Spasm; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Context Facial spasm is one of the common facial diseases, especially in the aged. It is mostly characterized by initially progressive, involuntary, irregular, recurrent, clonic, or tonic movements of muscles innervated by the facial nerve on one side. Acupuncture is a low-risk treatment with purported claims of effectiveness for facial spasm. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of acupuncture in facial spasm comprehensively. DESIGN: The research team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effectiveness of acupuncture for facial spasm. OUTCOME MEASURES: The research team categorized results from each of the reviewed studies in two ways: (1) the number of participants who showed a positive response to therapy (total effectiveness rate) and (2) the number of participants who made a full recovery (clinical cure rate). RESULTS: The research team reviewed a total of 13 studies involving 1262 participants with facial spasm. Researchers in China had conducted all studies, and most studies were poor in methodological quality. All studies reported that acupuncture was superior to other treatments, including carbamazepine, mecobalamin, and massage, and the meta-analysis on these low-quality studies yielded similar results. CONCLUSION: Present trials evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in treatment of facial spasm are mostly poor in methodological quality. These studies showed that acupuncture was superior to other treatments for facial spasm; however, in its meta-analysis, the research team could not draw an affirmative conclusion as to the benefits of acupuncture due to the poor methodological quality and localized population of the included trials. The field needs large international, well-conducted RCTs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; Copyright of Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine is the property of PH Innovisions Journal Operating LLC and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, Dujiangyan People's Hospital, Dujiangyan Medical Center, China.  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Hemifacial Spasm
  Disease Category Stomatognathic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1252  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, Y. Y.; Zheng, Z.; Xue, C. C. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Migraine: A Systematic Review of Chinese Literature Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Aust J Acup  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 3-16  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Headache Disorders; Migraine; Systematic Review;  
  Abstract Introduction: Acupuncture is widely used for the treatment of migraine, but its effectiveness is inconclusive based on findings of two recent systematic reviews. However, these reviews included very few studies conducted in Asian countries. Research papers published in Chinese are yet to be reviewed to determine their role in the overall understanding of the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for migraine. Objectives: Is acupuncture more effective than no treatment, sham/placebo acupuncture, or as effective as other interventions for migraine? Methods: Search Strategies: Electronic search was performed in the two most comprehensive Chinese e-databases, Vi Pu and Wan Fang. Keywords used were a combination of acupuncture, headache, migraine, Chinese medicine, electroacupuncture and point-stimulation. Selection Criteria: Randomised, controlled trials comparing acupuncture with any type of control interventions and reporting at least one of the clinically related outcome measures for migraine were selected. Data Collection and Analysis: Characteristics of the studies were extracted by two independent reviewers. Reporting quality and validity were assessed using the Jadad Scale, Internal Validity Scale and Oxford Pain Validity Scale. STRICTA was used to assess the reporting quality of acupuncture treatment. RevMan 4.2 was used for data analysis. Results: Seventeen studies with a total of 2097 participants (median 91; range 62-216) met the inclusion criteria. Ten studies compared acupuncture alone with western medications. The remaining seven trials compared a combined therapy of acupuncture and other therapies with western medications. None of the studies compared acupuncture with no-treatment control or sham/placebo acupuncture. None of the 17 studies was considered of high quality. Studies indicated that acupuncture alone was superior to western medications (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.88). In comparison to studies included in the other two reviews, the Chinese studies in this review had a larger sample size and acupuncture treatments were more frequent. Conclusion: There is moderate evidence that acupuncture is more effective than western pharmacotherapy. Due to the poor quality and validity of included studies, this conclusion requires further assessment. Data from Chinese literature should be included in future systematic reviews.  
  Address  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency (up) Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1268  
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