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Author Huang, L.; An, J.; Su, T.; Wang, P.; Daong, L.; Zhang, R.; Ren, Y.; Ren, Y. openurl 
  Title Therapeutic Efficacy Observation on Scalp Acupuncture for Vasular Dementia Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 33-43  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Dementia, Vascular; Vascular Dementia; Acu Versus CAM Control; Electroacupuncture; Scalp Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of scalp acupunture for vasular dementia due to deficiency of the liver and kidney in a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: A total of 184 cases were randomly allocated into a scalp acupuncture group and body acupuncture group. The mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Blessed-Roth behavior scale (BBS), activieies of daily living (ADL) scale and scores of signs and symptoms based traditional Chinese medicine were used to assess cases in both groups before and after the treatment. Results: The MMSE score and improvemnt of TCM-based signs and symptoms in the scalp acupuncture grop were significantly better than that in the control group (P<0.01), while there wer no statistical differences between the two groups in BBS and ADL score (P<0.05). The marked and total effective rates of cognition improvement in the scalp acupuncture group were significantly better than that in the control group, while there were no significant differences between the two groups in improvement of social behavior and TCM-based signs and symptoms. Also, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the total effetive rate for improvement of ADL. Conclusion: Scalp acupunture can substantially improve the VD patients' activity of daily living, alleviate the TCM-based signs and symptoms and increase their mental state and scoail behavior. In addition, scalp acupunture is safe, effective and easy to operate on any postures.  
  Address Acupunture Department, Xi'an Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shaanxi 710061, P.R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 60  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 184  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Dementia, Vascular
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 475  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jena, S.; Witt, C. M.; Brinkhaus, B.; Wegscheider, K.; Willich, S. N. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture in patients with headache Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 28 Issue 9 Pages 969-979  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Migraine; Pain; RCT; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Tension-Type Headache; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with primary headache (> 12 months, two or more headaches/month) compared with treatment with routine care alone and whether the effects of acupuncture differ in randomized and non-randomized patients. In a randomized controlled trial plus non-randomized cohort, patients with headache were allocated to receive up to 15 acupuncture sessions over 3 months or to a control group receiving no acupuncture during the first 3 months. Patients who did not consent to randomization received acupuncture treatment immediately. All subjects were allowed usual medical care in addition to study treatment. Number of days with headache, intensity of pain and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were assessed at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months using standardized questionnaires. Of 15,056 headache patients (mean age 44.1 +/- 12.8 years, 77% female), 1613 were randomized to acupuncture and 1569 to control, and 11,874 included in the non-randomized acupuncture group. At 3 months, the number of days with headache decreased from 8.4 +/- 7.2 (estimated mean +/-s.e.) to 4.7 +/- 5.6 in the acupuncture group and from 8.1 +/- 6.8 to 7.5 +/- 6.3 in the control group (P < 0.001). Similarly, intensity of pain and quality of life improvements were more pronounced in the acupuncture vs. control group (P < 0.001). Treatment success was maintained through 6 months. The outcome changes in non-randomized patients were similar to those in randomized patients. Acupuncture plus routine care in patients with headache was associated with marked clinical improvements compared with routine care alone  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite Medical Centre, Berlin, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 15  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 15  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 515  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johansson, J.; Redman, L.; Veldhuis, P. P.; Sazonova, A.; Labrie, F.; Holm, G.; Johannsson, G.; Stener-Victorin, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Genital Diseases, Female; Acu Versus Attention Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Ovulation Induction; Electroacupuncture; Attention Control; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture has been demonstrated to improve menstrual frequency and to decrease circulating testosterone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Our aim was to investigate whether acupuncture affects ovulation frequency and to understand the underlying mechanisms of any such effect by analyzing luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex steroid secretion in women with PCOS. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted between June 2009 and September 2010. Thirty-two women with PCOS were randomized to receive either acupuncture in combination with manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation or to meetings with a physical therapist twice a week for 10-13 weeks. Main outcome measures were changes in LH secretion patterns from baseline to after 10-13 weeks of treatment and ovulation frequency during the treatment period. Secondary outcomes were changes in the secretion of sex steroids, anti-Mullerian hormone, inhibin B, and serum cortisol. Ovulation frequency during treatment was higher in the acupuncture group compared with the control group. After 10-13 weeks of intervention, circulating levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, free-testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone glucuronide, androstane-3alpha, 17beta-diol-3glucuronide, and androstane-3alpha, 17beta-diol-17glucuronide decreased within the acupuncture group and were significantly lower than in the control group for all of these except androstenedione. We conclude that repeated acupuncture treatments resulted in higher ovulation frequency in lean/overweight women with PCOS and were more effective than just meeting with the therapist. Ovarian and adrenal sex steroid serum levels were reduced with no effect on LH secretion.  
  Address Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Week Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 32  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 533  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johnstone, P. A.; Bloom, T. L.; Niemtzow, R. C.; Crain, D.; Riffenburgh, R. H.; Amling, C. L. url  openurl
  Title A Prospective, Randomized Pilot Trial of Acupuncture of the Kidney-Bladder Distinct Meridian for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication The Journal of urology Abbreviated Journal J Urol  
  Volume 169 Issue 3 Pages 1037-1039  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Genital Diseases, Male; No Treatment Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Urinary Tract Infection; Urination Disorders; Urologic Diseases; Wait-List Control; Standard Needling Depth  
  Abstract PURPOSE We performed a pilot trial to assess the response of lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate specific antigen (PSA) to acupuncture in a population of patients biopsy negative for prostate cancer.MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 30 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 study groups, including observation for 3 months with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals, 9 sessions of acupuncture in 3 months to points of the kidney-bladder distinct meridian expected to treat the prostate with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals and 9 sessions of acupuncture in 3 months to points not expected to treat the prostate with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals. The effect of acupuncture on lower urinary tract symptoms was assessed monthly using the International Prostate Symptom Score.RESULTS Trend analysis (repeated measures ANOVA) revealed no significant changes in the 3-month period in the randomized arms. Statistical analysis showed p = 0.063 for the International Prostate Symptom Score, p = 0.945 for PSA and p = 0.37 for the free-to-total PSA ratio.CONCLUSIONS Acupuncture to the kidney-bladder distinct meridian neither relieves lower urinary tract symptoms nor impacts PSA  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Urinary Tract Infection
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score 60  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 537  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Linde, M.; Fjell, A.; Carlsson, J.; Dahlof, C. url  openurl
  Title Role of the needling per se in acupuncture as prophylaxis for menstrually related migraine: a randomized placebo-controlled study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 41-47  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Migraine; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Symptom Based Point Selection; Verum Acupoint Control; Women's Health; Menstruation Disturbances  
  Abstract The objectives were to introduce a new method for controlled trials of acupuncture in the field of headache research and to examine the role of needling per se. Women with menstrually related migraine were randomized to three months of treatment with verum or placebo needles. Three standard size casts were moulded to secure the placebo needles in the head. No significant differences were found between the verum group (n=15) and the placebo group (n=13) during treatment or follow up three and six months later, either in the attack frequency or in the number of days per month with migraine, headache intensity or drug-use. The casts held the needles exactly in place despite movements of the head, and are validated as practical, hygienic and extremely durable. This method is satisfactory for controlled studies of acupuncture in headache. It is possible that the positive results in earlier clinical trials on acupuncture in migraine are attributable to other mechanisms than needling of subcutaneous tissue  
  Address Gothenburg Migraine Clinic, Sahlgren Academy, Goteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. mattias.linde@neuro.gu.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 76  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 732  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, D. openurl 
  Title Combined Acupuncture-moxibustion and Psychotherapy for Perimenopause Syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 283-286  
  Keywords Perimenopause; RCT; Climacteric; AcuTrials; Acu + Usual Care Versus CAM; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Psychotherapy; Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy; CAM Control; Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the effect of combined acupuncture.moxibustion with psychotherapy in treating perimenopause syndrome. Methods: Eighty patients with perimenopause syndrome were randomized into two groups. Forty-two patients in the treatment group were intervened by acupuncture-moxibustion and psychotherapy, and the other 38 in the control group were treated by acupuncture-moxibustion only. The treatment was given once a day, 15 times constitute a treatment course. The therapeutic effects were evaluated after 3 treatment courses. Results: The total effective rate and the effective rate of the emotional state were both 97.6% in the treatment group, versus 89.5% and 73.7% in the control. The comparison of the total effective rate and the effective rate of the emotional state between the two groups both showed significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture-moxibusiton has better effect in treating perimenopause syndrome when combined with psychotherapy.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 45  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Perimenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 742  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, X.; Zhu, H.; Ruan, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical study on Combined Acupuncture and Chinese Medicinal Fumigation for Dry Eye Syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Tuina Sci  
  Volume 11 Issue 2 Pages 79-83  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Dry Eye Syndromes; Eye Diseases; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical effect of combined acupuncture and Chinese medicinal fumication for dry eye syndrome. METHODS: A total of 90 DES cases (180 eyes) were randomized into a treament group of 44 cases and a control group of 46 cases. Combined acupuncture and chinese medicinal atomizer fumigation was used in the treatment group, whereas Sodium Hyaluronate eye drops were used in the control group. The subjective symptoms, Schirmer I Test (SIT) and Break-up Time (BUT) of tear film were observed before and after treatment. RESULTS: The total effective rate in the treatment group was 78.4%, versus 12.0% in the control group, showing a statistical difference (P<0.01). After treatment, there were between-group statistical differences in SIT and subjective symptom grades (P<0.05, P<0.01). However, there was no between-group statsitical differences in BUT grade (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Combined Acupuncture and Chinese medicinal atomizer fuigation can help alleviate DES symptoms.  
  Address Longhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200032, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 45  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 90  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Dry Eye Syndromes
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ma, Y. X.; Ye, X. N.; Liu, C. Z.; Cai, P. Y.; Li, Z. F.; Du, D. Q.; Guo, G.; Chen, S. Z.; Zhao, J. P.; Liu, J. J.; Yi, H. Q.; Gao, S. Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A clinical trial of acupuncture about time-varying treatment and points selection in primary dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of ethnopharmacology Abbreviated Journal J Ethnopharmacol  
  Volume 148 Issue 2 Pages 498-504  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; No Treatment Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture at single point Shiqizhui (EX-B8) and multi-points in time-varying treatment for primary dysmenorrhea. METHODS: 600 patients with primary dysmenorrhea were randomly assigned to the single point group (n=200) including group A (treating before the menstruation, n=100) and group B (immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence, n=100), the multi-points group (n=200) including group C (treating before the menstruation, n=100) and group D (immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence, n=100), or the control group, group E (n=200, no treatment). The therapeutic effects were analyzed after treatment for three menstrual cycles and interviewed for three follow-up periods. RESULTS: Acupuncture could effectively relieve menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea compared with the control group (P<0.05, P<0.01). Immediate pain relief occurred following acupuncture within 5min in group B (P<0.01) and group D (P<0.01), and the two groups obviously relieved menstrual pain for VAS scores. Both group A and group C obviously relieved menstrual pain (P<0.01), and group C was better than group A (P<0.05). Compared with group D, Group C was much better for CMSS scores in cycle 1. CONCLUSION: Treating before the menstruation is better than immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence at the improvement in symptoms of dysmenorrheal at multi-points. And single point is better than multi-points when immediately treating as soon as pain occurrence. The present trial suggest Shiqizhui (EX-B8) should be chosen as a convenient point.  
  Address Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, Jinan 250355, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 600  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Dysmennorhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 795  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H.; Richmond, S.; Bland, M.; Brealey, S.; Gabe, R.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Perren, S.; Sculpher, M.; Spackman, E.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and counselling for depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS medicine Abbreviated Journal PLoS Med  
  Volume 10 Issue 9 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Mental Disorders; Depressive Disorder; Depression; Acu + Usual Care Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; CAM Control; Counseling; Usual Care Control, Multimodality  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is a significant cause of morbidity. Many patients have communicated an interest in non-pharmacological therapies to their general practitioners. Systematic reviews of acupuncture and counselling for depression in primary care have identified limited evidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate acupuncture versus usual care and counselling versus usual care for patients who continue to experience depression in primary care. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a randomised controlled trial, 755 patients with depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II score >/= 20) were recruited from 27 primary care practices in the North of England. Patients were randomised to one of three arms using a ratio of 2.2.1 to acupuncture (302), counselling (302), and usual care alone (151). The primary outcome was the difference in mean Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) scores at 3 months with secondary analyses over 12 months follow-up. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. PHQ-9 data were available for 614 patients at 3 months and 572 patients at 12 months. Patients attended a mean of ten sessions for acupuncture and nine sessions for counselling. Compared to usual care, there was a statistically significant reduction in mean PHQ-9 depression scores at 3 months for acupuncture (-2.46, 95% CI -3.72 to -1.21) and counselling (-1.73, 95% CI -3.00 to -0.45), and over 12 months for acupuncture (-1.55, 95% CI -2.41 to -0.70) and counselling (-1.50, 95% CI -2.43 to -0.58). Differences between acupuncture and counselling were not significant. In terms of limitations, the trial was not designed to separate out specific from non-specific effects. No serious treatment-related adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomised controlled trial of acupuncture and counselling for patients presenting with depression, after having consulted their general practitioner in primary care, both interventions were associated with significantly reduced depression at 3 months when compared to usual care alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN63787732 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 36 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 755  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Depressive Disorder
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 802  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mehta, P. K.; Polk, D. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, N.; Painovich, J.; Kothawade, K.; Kirschner, J.; Qiao, Y.; Ma, X.; Chen, Y. D.; Brantman, A.; Shufelt, C.; Minissian, M.; Bairey Merz, C. N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A randomized controlled trial of acupuncture in stable ischemic heart disease patients. Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication International journal of cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords RCT; Cardiovascular Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Wait List Control; Heart Rate Variability; Heart Disease; Ischemic Heart Disease  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) patients and is associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). We evaluated the impact of traditional acupuncture (TA) on cardiac autonomic function measured by HRV in SIHD patients. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled study of TA, sham acupuncture (SA), and waiting control (WC) in 151 SIHD subjects. The TA group received needle insertion at acupuncture sites, the SA group received a sham at non-acupuncture sites, while the WC group received nothing. The TA and SA groups received 3 treatments/week for 12weeks. 24-Hour, mental arithmetic stress, and cold pressor (COP) HRV was collected at entry and exit, along with BP, lipids, insulin resistance, hs-CRP, salivary cortisol, peripheral endothelial function by tonometry (PAT), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS: Mean age was 63+/-10; 50% had prior myocardial infarction. Comparison of WC and SA groups demonstrated differences consistent with the unblinded WC status; therefore by design, the control groups were not merged. Exit mental stress HRV was higher in TA vs. SA for markers of parasympathetic tone (p</=0.025), including a 17% higher vagal activity (p=0.008). There were no differences in exit 24-hour or COP HRV, BP, lipids, insulin resistance, hs-CRP, salivary cortisol, PAT, or psychosocial variables. CONCLUSIONS: TA results in intermediate effects on autonomic function in SIHD patients. TA effect on HRV may be clinically relevant and should be explored further. These data document feasibility and provide sample size estimation for a clinical trial of TA in SIHD patients for the prevention of SCD. CONDENSED ABSTRACT: We conducted a randomized, single-blind trial of traditional acupuncture (TA) vs. sham acupuncture (SA) vs waiting control (WC) in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) patients to evaluate cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability (HRV). Exit mental stress HRV was higher in the TA compared to SA group for time and frequency domain markers of parasympathetic tone (all p</=0.025), including a 17% higher vagal activity (p=0.008). These data document feasibility and provide sample size estimation for an outcome-based clinical trial of TA in SIHD patients for the prevention of sudden cardiac death.  
  Address Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, United States.; Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 36  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 151  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Myocardial Ischemia
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 847  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mei, C.; Ma, L.; Xu, H.; Sun, S. openurl 
  Title Clinical Observation on the Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncturing the Paravertebral Points on Parkinson's Disease (PD) Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 143-144  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Acupuncture; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 48  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 848  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miao, Edwin, Yong; Miao, Miranda, Yi mo; Kildea, Daniel, George; Lao, Yi-Wen url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Electroacupuncture and Electroacupuncture Plus Tao Hong Si Wu Wan in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Acupuncture & Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 6-14  
  Keywords Dysmenorrhea; Menstruation Disturbances; Women's Health; Gynecology; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Herbal Formula; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract Abstract: This study investigated the efficacies of electroacupuncture and electroacupuncture combined with Tao Hong Si Wu Wan in treating primary dysmenorrhea and compared the results with those obtained using conventional medical treatment. One treatment group, group 1, was administered Tao Hong Si Wu Wan (2625 mg) while the other, group 2, was administered a placebo (2625 mg) twice daily for 3 months. Electroacupuncture was used in both treatment groups: two sessions per menstrual cycle for three menstrual cycles. The reference group, group 3, was administered ibuprofen, 600 mg, twice daily, for five menstrual cycles. Uses of the herb, placebo and ibuprofen were blinded. A ridit analysis was used for testing and interpreting the effects of treatment. Pain intensity was determined using a qualitative grading method in a blinded manner. The ridit scores in groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than those in reference group immediately after treatment and three months later. Twelve months after the treatment, group 1 had a higher ridit score than group 2. In comparison to the reference group, groups 1 and 2 achieved better menstrual pain relief both immediately and 3 months after treatment. In addition, group 1 had better long-term pain relief than group 2.  
  Address M. Modern Traditional Chinese Medical Clinic, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia; M. Modern Traditional Chinese Medical Clinic, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia; School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) U  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 128  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 867  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mitchell, P.; Wells, J. E. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Chronic Asthma: A Controlled Trial with Six Months Follow-Up Type of Study RCT
  Year 1989 Publication American journal of acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Am J Acupunct  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 5-13  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Standard Needling Depth  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up 26 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 29  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 877  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nedeljkovic, M.; Tian, L.; Ji, P.; Deglon-Fischer, A.; Stute, P.; Ocon, E.; Birkhauser, M.; Ausfeld-Hafter, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine (Zhi Mu 14) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women: results of a four-arm randomized controlled pilot trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 15-24  
  Keywords Climacteric; Hot Flashes; Menopause; Postmenopause; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; CAM Control; Placebo Herbal Formula  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a clinical trial investigating the effects of acupuncture (AP) and Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) on hot flushes and quality of life in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Forty postmenopausal women reporting at least 20 hot flushes per week were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. They were randomly allocated to receive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) AP, sham AP, verum CHM, or placebo CHM for 12 weeks. Follow-up assessment was conducted 12 weeks after intervention. Primary outcome measures included hot flush frequency and severity. As a secondary outcome measure, the severity of menopausal symptoms was assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) II. RESULTS: TCM AP induced a significant decline in all outcome measures from pretreatment to posttreatment compared with sham AP (hot flush frequency, P = 0.016; hot flush severity, P = 0.013; MRS, P < 0.001). In the TCM AP group, a larger decrease in MRS scores persisted from pretreatment to follow-up (P = 0.048). No significant differences were noted between the verum CHM group and the placebo CHM group. Compared with the verum CHM group, there was a significant decrease in MRS scores (P = 0.002) and a trend toward a stronger decrease in hot flush severity (P = 0.06) in the TCM AP group from pretreatment to posttreatment. CONCLUSIONS: TCM AP is superior to sham AP and verum CHM in reducing menopausal symptoms, whereas verum CHM shows no significant improvements when compared with placebo CHM.  
  Address Institute of Complementary Medicine KIKOM, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nedstrand, E.; Wijma, K.; Wyon, Y.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title Vasomotor symptoms decrease in women with breast cancer randomized to treatment with applied relaxation or electro-acupuncture: a preliminary study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages 243-250  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Applied Relaxation; Breast Cancer; Cancer; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; Postmenopause; RCT; Relaxation; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vasomotor Symptoms; Women's Health; Neoplasms  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of applied relaxation and electro-acupuncture on vasomotor symptoms in women treated for breast cancer. METHODS: Thirty-eight postmenopausal women with breast cancer and vasomotor symptoms were randomized to treatment with electro-acupuncture (n = 19) or applied relaxation (n = 19) during 12 weeks. The number of hot flushes was registered daily in a logbook before and during treatment and after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. RESULTS: Thirty-one women completed 12 weeks of treatment and 6 months of follow-up. After 12 weeks of applied relaxation, the number of flushes/24 h had decreased from 9.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 6.6-11.9) at baseline to 4.5 (95% CI 3.2-5.8) and to 3.9 (95% CI 1.8-6.0) at 6 months follow-up (n = 14). The flushes/24 h were reduced from 8.4 (95% CI 6.6-10.2) to 4.1 (95% CI 3.0-5.2) after 12 weeks of treatment with electro-acupuncture and to 3.5 (95% CI 1.7-5.3) after 6 months follow-up (n = 17). In both groups, the mean Kupperman Index score was significantly reduced after treatment and remained unchanged 6 months after end of treatment. CONCLUSION: We suggest that applied relaxation and electro-acupuncture should be further evaluated as possible treatments for vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women with breast cancer  
  Address Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Unit of Medical Psychology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 38  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nedstrand, E.; Wyon, Y.; Hammar, M.; Wijma, K. url  openurl
  Title Psychological well-being improves in women with breast cancer after treatment with applied relaxation or electro-acupuncture for vasomotor symptom Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 193-199  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; AcuTrials; Breast Cancer; Breast Neoplasms; Depression; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; RCT; Relaxation Techniques; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vasomotor Symptoms; Women's Health; Depressive Disorder; Mental Disorders; Cancer  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of applied relaxation and electro-acupuncture (EA) on psychological well-being in breast cancer-treated women with vasomotor symptoms. Thirty-eight breast cancer-treated postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms were included in the study. They were randomized to either treatment with electro-acupuncture (EA) (n = 19, three of them with tamoxifen) or applied relaxation (AR) (n = 19, five of them with tamoxifen) over a 12-week study period with six months follow-up. Vasomotor symptoms were registered daily. A visual analog scale was used to assess climacteric symptom, estimation of general well-being was made using the Symptom Checklist, and mood using the Mood Scale. These were applied during treatment and at follow-up. In total 31 women completed 12 weeks of treatment and six months of follow-up. Hot flushes were reduced by more than 50%. Climacteric symptoms significantly decreased during treatment and remained so six months after treatment in both groups. Psychological well-being significantly improved during therapy and at follow-up visits in both groups. Mood improved significantly in the electro-acupuncture treated group. In conclusion psychological well-being improved in women with breast cancer randomized to treatment with either AR or EA for vasomotor symptoms and we therefore suggest that further studies should be performed in order to evaluate and develop these alternative therapies  
  Address Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. elizabeth.nedstrand@lio.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 31  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score 54  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 903  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reinhold, T.; Brinkhaus, B.; Willich, S. N.; Witt, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Patients Suffering from Allergic Asthma: Is It Worth Additional Costs? Type of Study
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 169-177  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Asthma; Acu Versus Wait List; Acupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Wait List Control; Cost Effectiveness  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture is increasingly used in patients with allergic asthma, but there is a lack of evidence on the cost-benefit relationship of this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess economic aspects of additional acupuncture treatment in patients with allergic bronchial asthma compared to patients receiving routine care alone. Design, subjects, intervention, outcome measures: In a randomized controlled trial, patients with allergic bronchial asthma were either allocated to a group receiving acupuncture immediately or a waiting-list control group. Both groups were free to use routine care treatment. The resource consumption, costs, and health-related quality of life were evaluated at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months by using statutory health insurance information and standardized questionnaires. Main economic outcome parameters were direct and indirect cost differences during the study period and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of acupuncture treatment. Results: Three hundred and six (306) patients (159 acupuncture; 147 controls) were included (mean age 46.5+/-13.11 years, female 57.2%) and were comparable at baseline. Acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly higher costs compared to control patients (overall costs: euro860.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) 705.04-1016.47] versus euro518.80 [95% CI 356.66-680.93]; p=0.003; asthma-related costs: euro517.52 [95% CI 485.63-549.40] versus euro144.87 [95% CI 111.70-178.05]; p<0.001). These additional costs seem essentially driven by acupuncture costs themselves (euro378.40 [95% CI 367.10-389.69]). However, acupuncture was associated with superior effectiveness in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Resulting ICER lay between euro23,231 (overall) and euro25,315 (diagnosis-specific) per additional QALY. When using German acupuncture prices of year 2012, the ICER would improve to euro12.810 (overall) versus euro14,911 (diagnosis-specific) per QALY gained. Conclusions: Treating patients who have allergic bronchial asthma with acupuncture in addition to routine care resulted in additional costs and better effects in terms of patients' quality of life. Acupuncture therefore seems to be a useful and cost-effective add-on treatment.  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite-University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 357  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 981  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sandberg, M.; Wijma, K.; Wyon, Y.; Nedstrand, E.; Hammar, M. url  openurl
  Title Effects of electro-acupuncture on psychological distress in postmenopausal women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 161-169  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Climacteric; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Menopause; Mental Disorders; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Climacteric; Postmenopause  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on general psychological distress and relate to experience of climacteric symptoms in 30 postmenopausal women. DESIGN: A randomised single-blind controlled design was used to evaluate effects of EA and extremely superficial needle insertion, with the latter serving as a near-placebo control. SETTINGS: The Linkoping University Hospital in Sweden. Interventions: Fourteen treatments during 12 weeks with follow-ups at 3 and 6 months. OUTCOME MEASURES: General psychological well-being, mood and experience of climacteric symptoms. RESULTS: Mood Scale improved only in EA group and not until 12 weeks compared to baseline, from 110 to 129 (P = 0.01), and to 120 at 3-month follow-up (P = 0.04). Mood was significantly better than control at 8 (P = 0.05) and 12 weeks (P = 0.01). Visual analogue scale estimation of climacteric symptoms was decreased at 4 weeks in both groups, and lasted throughout the study period, in EA group from 5 to 2 (P = 0.04) and in control group from 5 to 3 (P = 0.02) at 6-month follow-up. Well-being was ameliorated from 4 weeks in EA and from 8 weeks in control group until end of study (P = 0.01, P = 0.03). No significant differences on climacteric symptoms or well-being existed between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not show that EA is better than superficial needle insertion for the amelioration of general psychological distress and experience of climacteric symptoms in women with vasomotor symptoms after menopause. However, the more pronounced effect on mood suggests that EA might have additional effects compared with superficial needle insertion  
  Address Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. margareta.sandberg@lio.se  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 14  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Postmenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score 72  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1013  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tian, X. openurl 
  Title Effect of Acupuncture and Tradtitional Chinese Herbal Medicine in Treating Endometriosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 145-150  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Bloodletting; Endometriosis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Formula; Moxa, Indirect; Moxa Box; Moxibustion; Plum-Blossom; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Genital Diseases, Female  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 27  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 78  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Endometriosis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score 60  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1164  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Walker, E. M.; Rodriguez, A. I.; Kohn, B.; Ball, R. M.; Pegg, J.; Pocock, J. R.; Nunez, R.; Peterson, E.; Jakary, S.; Levine, R. A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture versus venlafaxine for the management of vasomotor symptoms in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Oncol  
  Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 634-640  
  Keywords Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Neoplasms; Vasomotor Symptoms; Hot Flashes; Climacteric; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Acupuncture; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; AcuTrials; Cancer  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Vasomotor symptoms are common adverse effects of antiestrogen hormone treatment in conventional breast cancer care. Hormone replacement therapy is contraindicated in patients with breast cancer. Venlafaxine (Effexor), the therapy of choice for these symptoms, has numerous adverse effects. Recent studies suggest acupuncture may be effective in reducing vasomotor symptoms in menopausal women. This randomized controlled trial tested whether acupuncture reduces vasomotor symptoms and produces fewer adverse effects than venlafaxine. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty patients were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of acupuncture (n = 25) or venlafaxine (n = 25) treatment. Health outcomes were measured for up to 1 year post-treatment. RESULTS: Both groups exhibited significant decreases in hot flashes, depressive symptoms, and other quality-of-life symptoms, including significant improvements in mental health from pre- to post-treatment. These changes were similar in both groups, indicating that acupuncture was as effective as venlafaxine. By 2 weeks post-treatment, the venlafaxine group experienced significant increases in hot flashes, whereas hot flashes in the acupuncture group remained at low levels. The venlafaxine group experienced 18 incidences of adverse effects (eg, nausea, dry mouth, dizziness, anxiety), whereas the acupuncture group experienced no negative adverse effects. Acupuncture had the additional benefit of increased sex drive in some women, and most reported an improvement in their energy, clarity of thought, and sense of well-being. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture appears to be equivalent to drug therapy in these patients. It is a safe, effective and durable treatment for vasomotor symptoms secondary to long-term antiestrogen hormone use in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. ewalker1@hfhs.org  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment (down) 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1226  
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