toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Records Links
Author Gutke, A.; Betten, C.; Degerskar, K.; Pousette, S.; Fagevik Olsen, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Treatments for pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain: a systematic review of physiotherapy modalities Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand  
  Volume 94 Issue 11 Pages 1156-1167  
  Keywords Pregnancy Complications; Pelvic Pain; Women's Health; Systematic Review; Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, CINAHL, AMED, and SCOPUS databases were searched up to December 2014 for studies written in English, French, German or Scandinavian languages that evaluated physiotherapeutic modalities for preventing and treating pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. RESULTS: For lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy, the evidence was strong for positive effects of acupuncture and pelvic belts. The evidence was low for exercise in general and for specific stabilizing exercises. The evidence was very limited for efficacy of water gymnastics, progressive muscle relaxation, a specific pelvic tilt exercise, osteopathic manual therapy, craniosacral therapy, electrotherapy and yoga. For postpartum lumbopelvic pain, the evidence was very limited for clinic-based treatment concepts, including specific stabilizing exercises, and for self-management interventions for women with severe disabilities. No specific adverse events were reported for any intervention. No meta-analysis could be performed because of study heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: The levels of evidence were strong for a positive effect of acupuncture and pelvic belts, but weak for an effect of specific exercises. Caution should prevail in choosing other interventions for pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain.  
  Address Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pelvic Pain
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:26018758 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1965  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mangesi, L.; Zakarija-Grkovic, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Treatments for breast engorgement during lactation Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2016 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages Cd006946  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Lactation Disorders; Pregnancy Complications; Women's Health; Mastitis; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Breast engorgement is a painful condition affecting large numbers of women in the early postpartum period. It may lead to premature weaning, cracked nipples, mastitis and breast abscess. Various forms of treatment for engorgement have been studied but so far little evidence has been found on an effective intervention. OBJECTIVES: This is an update of a systematic review first published by Snowden et al. in 2001 and subsequently published in 2010. The objective of this update is to seek new information on the best forms of treatment for breast engorgement in lactating women. SEARCH METHODS: We identified studies for inclusion through the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 June 2015) and searched reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for eligibility, extracted data and conducted 'Risk of bias' assessments. Where insufficient data were presented in trial reports, we attempted to contact study authors and obtain necessary information. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: In total, we included 13 studies with 919 women. In 10 studies individual women were the unit of analysis and in three studies, individual breasts were the unit of analysis. Four out of 13 studies were funded by an agency with a commercial interest, two received charitable funding, and two were funded by government agencies.Trials examined interventions including non-medical treatments: cabbage leaves (three studies), acupuncture (two studies), ultrasound (one study), acupressure (one study), scraping therapy (Gua Sha) (one study), cold breast-packs and electromechanical massage (one study), and medical treatments: serrapeptase (one study), protease (one study) and subcutaneous oxytocin (one study). The studies were small and used different comparisons with only single studies contributing data to outcomes of this review. We were unable to pool results in meta-analysis and only seven studies provided outcome data that could be included in data and analysis. Non-medicalNo differences were observed in the one study comparing acupuncture with usual care (advice and oxytocin spray) (risk ratio (RR) 0.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 1.92; one study; 140 women) in terms of cessation of breastfeeding. However, women in the acupuncture group were less likely to develop an abscess (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.01; one study; 210 women), had less severe symptoms on day five (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99), and had a lower rate of pyrexia (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.94) than women in the usual care group.In another study with 39 women comparing cabbage leaf extract with placebo, no differences were observed in breast pain (mean difference (MD) 0.40, 95% CI -0.67 to 1.47; low-quality evidence) or breast engorgement (MD 0.20, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.58; low-quality evidence). There was no difference between ultrasound and sham treatment in analgesic requirement (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.51; one study; 45 women; low-quality evidence). A study comparing Gua-Sha therapy with hot packs and massage found a marked difference in breast engorgement (MD -2.42, 95% CI -2.98 to -1.86; one study; 54 women), breast pain (MD -2.01, 95% CI -2.60 to -1.42; one study; 54 women) and breast discomfort (MD -2.33, 95% CI -2.81 to -1.85; one study; 54 women) in favour of Gua-Sha therapy five minutes post-intervention, though both interventions significantly decreased breast temperature, engorgement, pain and discomfort at five and 30 minutes post-treatment.Results from individual trials that could not be included in data analysis suggested that there were no differences between room temperature and chilled cabbage leaves and between chilled cabbage leaves and gel packs, with all interventions producing some relief. Intermittent hot/cold packs applied for 20 minutes twice a day were found to be more effective than acupressure (P < 0.001). Acupuncture did not improve maternal satisfaction with breastfeeding. In another study, women who received breast-shaped cold packs were more likely to experience a reduction in pain intensity than women who received usual care; however, the differences between groups at baseline, and the failure to observe randomisation, make this study at high risk of bias. One study found a decrease in breast temperature (P = 0.03) following electromechanical massage and pumping in comparison to manual methods; however, the high level of attrition and alternating method of sequence generation place this study at high risk of bias. MedicalWomen treated with protease complex were less likely to have no improvement in pain (RR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.74; one study; 59 women) and swelling (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.79; one study; 59 women) on the fourth day of treatment and less likely to experience no overall change in their symptoms or worsening of symptoms (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.56). It should be noted that it is more than 40 years since the study was carried out, and we are not aware that this preparation is used in current practice. Subcutaneous oxytocin provided no relief at all in symptoms at three days (RR 3.13, 95% CI 0.68 to 14.44; one study; 45 women).Serrapeptase was found to produce some relief in breast pain, induration and swelling, when compared to placebo, with a fewer number of women experiencing slight to no improvement in overallbreast engorgement, swelling and breast pain.Overall, the risk of bias of studies in the review is high. The overall quality as assessed using the GRADE approach was found to be low due to limitations in study design and the small number of women in the included studies, with only single studies providing data for analysis. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Although some interventions such as hot/cold packs, Gua-Sha (scraping therapy), acupuncture, cabbage leaves and proteolytic enzymes may be promising for the treatment of breast engorgement during lactation, there is insufficient evidence from published trials on any intervention to justify widespread implementation. More robust research is urgently needed on the treatment of breast engorgement.  
  Address Victoria Hospital, Lovedale Road, Ntselamanzi Location, Alice, South Africa, 5700  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Lactation Disorders
  Disease Category Pregnancy Complications OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27351423 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2051  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yuan, J.; Kerr, D.; Park, J.; Liu, X. H.; McDonough, S. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment regimens of acupuncture for low back pain--a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 295-304  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Acupuncture; Low Back Pain; Back Pain; Systematic Review; LBP  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate the difference in acupuncture treatment regimens for low back pain (LBP) among textbooks, clinical studies and clinical practice, and explore reasons for such differences. METHODS: A systematic review of textbooks, surveys, clinical studies (randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and case studies) published in English or Chinese, was conducted, plus Chinese expert opinions. Data on detailed acupuncture treatment regimens were extracted. RESULTS: 12 textbooks in English, 31 textbooks in Chinese, 3 surveys in English, no surveys in Chinese, 9 Chinese expert opinions, 25 RCTs in English, 29 RCTs in Chinese, and 38 case studies in English were included. For chronic non-specific LBP, the outstanding differences in regimens found were (irrespective of the approach of acupuncture): (i) clinical studies and surveys (9-11 points) reported the use of many more points per session than Chinese experts (5 points); (ii) two extreme frequencies of treatments were used across all sources (1-2 times/week vs. 5-6 times/week). For acute LBP, the notable differences between RCTs and case studies were: (i) a variety of special points were investigated; (ii) case studies reported the use of many more points per session (10 points) than RCTs in Chinese (2 points); (iii) RCTs in Chinese administrated more treatments (6.5 sessions) than RCTs in English (3.5 sessions) and case studies (3 sessions). CONCLUSION: For non-specific LBP, treatment regimens of acupuncture differ by the types of reference sources, in terms of treatment frequency, the points chosen, number of points needled per session, duration and sessions, and co-interventions.  
  Address School of Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Co Antrim BT37 0QB, United Kingdom.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, L.H.; Cross, S.; Barrett, J.; French, B.; Leathley, M.; Sutton, C.J.; Watkins, C. openurl 
  Title (down) Treatment of urinary incontinence after stroke in adults (review) Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 1 Pages i-39  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Acupuncture; Urinary Incontinence; Urologic Diseases; Stroke; Nervous System Diseases  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Urinary Incontinence
  Disease Category Urologic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1159  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Guo, N. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of sprain by electro-acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 119-120  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sports Medicine; Sprains and Strains; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract  
  Address School Hospital, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Sprains and Strains
  Disease Category Sports Medicine OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 409  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, J.; Pan, W.; Tang, C. openurl 
  Title (down) Treatment of Simple Obesity with Catgut Embedding Therapy Combined with Electro Acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 11-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases; Obesity; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Catgut Embedding; CAM Control; Weight Loss  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 80  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Obesity
  Disease Category Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1242  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pei, J. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of sciatica by acupuncture at jiaji points--a report of 168 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 266-268  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sciatica; TCM Acupuncture Style; Back Pain  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Liaoning College of Traditional Chinese Medicine  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 168  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Sciatica
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 941  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhu, X.; Bi, A.; Han, X. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of retinal vein obstruction with acupuncture and Chinese medicinal herbs Type of Study RCT
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 211-213  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Herbal Formula; RCT; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Eye Diseases; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Bloodletting  
  Abstract We have treated thirty-two cases (52 eyes) of retinal vein obstruction by acupuncture and oral administration of Huo Xue Ming Mu Decoction. The total effective rate of 90.38% demonstrated that the treatment was definitely effective  
  Address Zibo Municipal TCM Hospital, Zibo 255300, Shandong Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Retinal Vein Occlusion
  Disease Category Eye Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1490  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of pseudobulbar paralysis by scalp acupuncture and sublingual needling Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 26-27  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; AcuTrials; Dysphagia; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hemiplegia; Paralysis; Pseudobulbar Paralysis; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Scalp Acupuncture; Scalp Electroacupuncture; Speech Disorders; Stroke; Sublingual Needling; TCM Acupuncture Style; Voice Disorders; Pseudobulbar Palsy  
  Abstract  
  Address Xuzhou Municipal TCM Hospital, Xuzhou 221000, Jiangsu Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 82  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Pseudobulbar Palsy
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 759  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, Y.; Wang, C.; Lin, Y. openurl 
  Title (down) Treatment of Prostatalgia by Acupuncture: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication J Acupunct Tuina Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 4 Pages 233-236  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Genital Diseases, Male; Prostatitis; Prostatalgia; Rct; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; Herbal Formula; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture therapy for prostatalgia. Methods: Sixty subjects were randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group in which 30 cases were treated by acupuncture and a medication group in which the other 30 cases were treated with herbal decoction. The clinical efficacy in these two groups were observed and compared. Results: In the acupuncture group, 5 cases were cured, 12 cases were significantly improved, 11 cases improved and 2 cases failed, and the overall effective rate was 93.3%. In the medication group, 2 cases were cured, 8 cases were significantly improved, 13 cases improved and 7 cases failed, and the overall effective rate was 76.6%; the overall effective rate was higher in the acupuncture group than in the medication group (P<0.05). Moreover, the total score of National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), and the scores for pain severity, urinary symptoms and quality of life were reduced more significantly in the acupuncture group than in the medication group. Conclusion: Acupuncture is an effective therapy for prostatalgia.  
  Address No. 1 Hospital of Sanming City, Fujian 365000. P. R. China; Hospital of Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine of Sanming City, Fujian 365000, P. R. China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Prostatitis
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Male OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 4/2/2015; Date Modified: 5/15/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Prostatitis; No. 1 Hospital of Sanming City, Fujian 365000. P. R. China; Hospital of Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine of Sanming City, Fujian 365000, P. R. China Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1736  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Appiah, R.; Hiller, S.; Caspary, L.; Alexander, K.; Creutzig, A. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of primary Raynaud's syndrome with traditional Chinese acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 1997 Publication Journal of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal J Intern Med  
  Volume 241 Issue 2 Pages 119-124  
  Keywords Acu Versus No Treatment; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Moxibustion; No Treatment Control; RCT; Raynaud Disease; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vascular Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effects of a standardized acupuncture treatment in primary Raynaud's syndrome. DESIGN: A controlled randomized prospective study. SETTING: A winter period of 23 weeks, angiological clinic of Hannover Medical School. SUBJECTS: Thirty-three patients with primary Raynaud's syndrome (16 control, 17 treatment). INTERVENTIONS: The patients of the treatment group were given seven acupuncture treatments during the weeks 10 and 11 of the observation period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients kept a diary throughout the entire observation period noting daily frequency, duration and severity of their vasospastic attacks. A local cooling test combined with nailfold capillaroscopy was performed for all patients at baseline (week 1) and in weeks 12 and 23, recording flowstop reactions of the nailfold capillaries. RESULTS: The treated patients showed a significant decrease in the frequency of attacks from 1.4 day-1 to 0.6 day-1, P < 0.01 (control 1.6 to 1.2, P = 0.08). The overall reduction of attacks was 63% (control 27%, P = 0.03). The mean duration of the capillary flowstop reaction decreased from 71 to 24 s (week 1 vs. week 12, P = 0.001) and 38 s (week 1 vs. week 23, P = 0.02) respectively. In the control group the changes were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that traditional Chinese acupuncture is a reasonable alternative in treating patients with primary Raynaud's syndrome  
  Address Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Angiology, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 7  
  Treatment Follow-up 28 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 33  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Raynaud's Disease
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 34  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jiang, Z.; Li, C.; Li, Y. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of postapoplectic thalamic spontaneous pain by electroacupuncture at huatuojiaji points Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 3 Pages 195-199  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; AcuTrials; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hemiplegia; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract The authors have treated 30 cases of postapoplectic thalamic spontaneous pain (PTSP) by electro-acupuncture at Huatuojiaji points (Extra), with the other 30 cases of PTSP treated by oral administration of carbamazepine as the controls. The total effective rate was 90% in the acupuncture group, and 86.7% in the control group. The difference in the total effective rate between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05), suggesting that electroacupuncture at Huatuojiaji (Extra) is a better therapy for PTSP  
  Address Hospital Affiliated to Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy, Sichuan Province  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 525  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Karagounis, P.; Tsironi, M.; Prionas, G.; Tsiganos, G.; Baltopoulos, P. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of plantar fasciitis in recreational athletes: two different therapeutic protocols Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Foot & ankle specialist Abbreviated Journal Foot Ankle Specialist  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 226-234  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Foot Diseases; Fasciitis, Plantar; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; Trigger Point Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol  
  Abstract Plantar fasciitis (PF) commonly causes inferior heel pain and occurs in up to 10% of the US population. Treatment protocols in most studies include the use of ice therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and stretching and strengthening protocols. The aim of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of 2 different therapeutic approaches on the treatment of PF in recreational athletes using the Pain and Disability Scale for the evaluation. A total of 38 participants with PF were randomly allocated to 2 different groups of 19 male participants in each group. Group 1 was treated with ice, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, and a stretching and a strengthening program. Group 2 received the same therapeutic procedures as group 1, reinforced by acupuncture treatment. The primary outcomes, nominated a priori, were pain description and mobility-function at 1 and 2 months. Outcomes were measured with the pain scale for PF. The mean total score of the acupuncture group at the third measurement was statistically minor compared with the mean total score of the first group. Acupuncture should be considered as a major therapeutic instrument for the decrease of heel pain, combined with traditional medical approaches.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 38  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Fasciitis, Plantar
  Disease Category Foot Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 552  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cui, R.; Zhou, D. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of phlegm- and heat-induced insomnia by acupuncture in 120 cases Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 57-58  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Insomnia; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sleep Disorders; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder  
  Abstract  
  Address Beijing TCM Hospital, Beijing 100010  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 214  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Melchart, D.; Hager, S.; Hager, U.; Liao, J.; Weidenhammer, W.; Linde, K. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of patients with chronic headaches in a hospital for traditional Chinese medicine in Germany. A randomised, waiting list controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2004 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 2-3 Pages 71-78  
  Keywords Acu Versus Wait List; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Migraine; RCT; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tension-Type Headache; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Unrestricted Modalities; Wait-List Control; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of a clinical treatment program with traditional Chinese medicine for migraine and tension-type headache. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with migraine, episodic or chronic tension-type headache according to the criteria of the International Headache Society were randomised into an experimental or a waiting list control group. Patients in the experimental group were treated 4 weeks in a hospital for traditional Chinese medicine after a baseline period of one month. Patients in the waiting list group continued their previous headache treatment. Main outcome measure was the difference in the number of days with headache of at least moderate intensity during baseline (month 1) and month 7. RESULTS: The difference in the number of days with headache of at least moderate intensity was 5.6 (S.D., 6.1) days in the experimental group and 1.2 (S.D., 4.5) days in the waiting list group (P <0.001). A reduction of more than 50% in headache days was observed in 52% of the patients in the experimental group and 16% in the waiting list group. Patients with migraine and a combination of migraine and episodic tension-type headaches improved more than patients with other headaches. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that treatment in the hospital for traditional Chinese medicine in Kotzting is associated with lasting improvements in the majority of patients  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine II, Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, Technische Universitat Munchen, Kaiserstr. 9, 80801 Munich, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 91  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score 65  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 849  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Freire, A. O.; Sugai, G. C.; Chrispin, F. S.; Togeiro, S. M.; Yamamura, Y.; Mello, L. E.; Tufik, S. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with acupuncture: a randomised, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 43-50  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Insomnia; Penetrating Sham; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive; Sleep Disorders; TCM Acupuncture Style; Sleep Apnea Syndromes  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), assessed by polysomnography (PSG) and questionnaires of functional quality of life (SF-36) and excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blinded study, with blinded evaluation on 36 patients presenting an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) of 15-30/h, assessed by PSG. The study took place at the Public Hospital of the Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Brazil, in the Division of Sleep Disorders of the Department of Psychobiology, between January, 2002 and August, 2004. Patients were randomly assigned to three groups: the acupuncture group (n=12); the sham group, submitted to needle insertion in non-acupoints (n=12); and the control group, receiving no treatment (n=12). Patients received acupuncture or sham acupuncture once a week for 10 weeks. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients completed the study. The AHI (P=0.005), the apnea index (AI) (P=0.008) and the number of respiratory events (P=0.005) decreased significantly in the acupuncture group but not in the sham group. On the other hand, the control group displayed significant deterioration in some of the polysomnographic parameters, with a significant increase in the number of respiratory events (P=0.025). Acupuncture treatment significantly improved (before vs. after treatment) several dimensions of the SF-36 and Epworth questionnaires. There was no significant association between changes in the body mass index (BMI) and AHI. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture in ameliorating the respiratory events of patients presenting with moderate OSAS  
  Address Sleep Division, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Sleep Apnea Syndromes
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score 84  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 338  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dornelles, M. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of Low Back Pain with specific Acupoint. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2000 Publication Medical acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Med Acupunct Web J  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Low Back Pain; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; TCM Acupuncture Style; Low Back Pain, Chronic  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 10  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 258  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Feng, L. openurl 
  Title (down) Treatment of Ischemic Apoplexy Based on the Theory of “Lingering Illness Affecting Collaterals” Type of Study RCT
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 55-58  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arteriosclerosis; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Herbal Injection; Herbal Formula; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Ichemic apoplexy, also called ischemic cerebrovascular disease (including cerebral thrombosis, cerebral embolism, and transient cerebral ischemic attack), belongs to the TCM category of “wind-stroke syndomre.” The increasingly high incidence of the disease has imposed serious influence on life quality of people. Based on the theory of “lingering illness affecting collaterals,” we have treated the disease by acupuncture and oral administration of leech capsule and centipede capsule, with good therapeutic results reported as follows.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 316  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zeng, X.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.; Wang, Z. url  openurl
  Title (down) Treatment of heroinism with acupuncture at points of the Du Channel Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan / sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Tradit Chin Med  
  Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 166-170  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anxiety; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Substance-Related Disorders; TCM Acupuncture Style; Heroin Dependence; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract To observe the effectiveness of acupuncture at points of the Du Channel in treating heroinism, seventy patients with heroinism were randomly divided into a treatment group (n= 35) and a control group (n=35). A 10-day decrescendo therapy of methadone and acupuncture at points of the Du Channel were adopted in the treatment group, while the 10-day decrescendo therapy of methadone was simply performed in the control group. The scoring and grading of the abstinence symptoms were recorded and evaluated for both groups. 31 cases in the treatment group and 26 cases in the control group completed the entire treatment process, and a significant difference (P<0.01) in scores of abstinence symptoms before and after treatment was noticed in the two groups. The obvious difference in scores of abstinence symptoms on the first, second, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth day in the treatment group was superior to those in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Particularly for such symptoms as perspiration, anxiety and pain in the muscle and bone, the result in the treatment group was much better than that in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Acupuncture at points of the Du Channel has an auxiliary therapeutic effect on abstinence symptoms of heroinism, which can effectively help alleviate the abstinence symptoms  
  Address Changsha Vocational College of Civil Affairs, Hunan 410004, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 57  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Heroin Dependence
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 44  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1421  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zeng, Y. openurl 
  Title (down) Treatment of hegu needling in 64 cases of idopathic restless leg syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 21-23  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Nervous System Diseases; Restless Legs Syndrome; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Chicken Claw Needling; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu  
  Abstract  
  Address Third Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, China. E-mail: brianfourinchina@mac.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 121  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Restless Legs Syndrome
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1422  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: