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Author Cameron, I. D.; Wang, E.; Sindhusake, D. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized trial comparing acupuncture and simulated acupuncture for subacute and chronic whiplash Type of Study RCT
  Year 2011 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 36 Issue 26 Pages E1659-65  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Wounds and Injuries; Whiplash Injuries; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Sham Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial with 3 and 6 months follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with simulated acupuncture in patients with subacute and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Acupuncture is widely used for the treatment of neck and other musculoskeletal pain, and there is some evidence supporting its effectiveness for short-term pain relief. The effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of whiplash-associated disorders is not clear. METHODS: A total of 124 patients between 18 and 65 years with chronic (85%) or subacute whiplash-associated disorders (Grade I or II) were randomly allocated to real or simulated electroacupuncture treatment for 12 sessions during a 6-week period. Both treatments involved skin penetration with acupuncture needles and were provided by a single university-trained acupuncturist in a University Clinic in Sydney, Australia. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity (10-cm visual analog scale), disability (Neck Disability Index), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). Secondary outcomes were patient-specific activity scales, and the McGill Pain Rating Index. RESULTS: Mean initial pain intensity for all participants was 5.6 cm. Participants receiving the real electroacupuncture treatment had significantly greater reduction in pain intensity at 3 and 6 months, 0.9 cm (P = 0.05) and 1.3 cm (P = 0.007), respectively, in comparison to the sham electro-acupuncture group. After adjustment for baseline status, there was no significant reduction in disability, or improvement in health-related quality of life. There was an improvement in the activity scales of a similar size to the reduction in pain, but no difference in the McGill Index. CONCLUSION: Real electroacupuncture was associated with a significant reduction in pain intensity over at least 6 months. This reduction was probably not clinically significant. There was no improvement in disability or quality of life.  
  Address Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ian.cameron@sydney.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 124  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Whiplash Injuries
  Disease Category Wounds and Injuries OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 105  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cherkin, D. C.; Sherman, K. J.; Avins, A. L.; Erro, J. H.; Ichikawa, L.; Barlow, W. E.; Delaney, K.; Hawkes, R.; Hamilton, L.; Pressman, A.; Khalsa, P. S.; Deyo, R. A. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized trial comparing acupuncture, simulated acupuncture, and usual care for chronic low back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Archives of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Arch Intern Med  
  Volume 169 Issue 9 Pages 858-866  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Low Back Pain, Chronic; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Low Back Pain; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; TCM Acupuncture Style; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a popular complementary and alternative treatment for chronic back pain. Recent European trials suggest similar short-term benefits from real and sham acupuncture needling. This trial addresses the importance of needle placement and skin penetration in eliciting acupuncture effects for patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: A total of 638 adults with chronic mechanical low back pain were randomized to individualized acupuncture, standardized acupuncture, simulated acupuncture, or usual care. Ten treatments were provided over 7 weeks by experienced acupuncturists. The primary outcomes were back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score; range, 0-23) and symptom bothersomeness (0-10 scale). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 8, 26, and 52 weeks. RESULTS: At 8 weeks, mean dysfunction scores for the individualized, standardized, and simulated acupuncture groups improved by 4.4, 4.5, and 4.4 points, respectively, compared with 2.1 points for those receiving usual care (P < .001). Participants receiving real or simulated acupuncture were more likely than those receiving usual care to experience clinically meaningful improvements on the dysfunction scale (60% vs 39%; P < .001). Symptoms improved by 1.6 to 1.9 points in the treatment groups compared with 0.7 points in the usual care group (P < .001). After 1 year, participants in the treatment groups were more likely than those receiving usual care to experience clinically meaningful improvements in dysfunction (59% to 65% vs 50%, respectively; P = .02) but not in symptoms (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Although acupuncture was found effective for chronic low back pain, tailoring needling sites to each patient and penetration of the skin appear to be unimportant in eliciting therapeutic benefits. These findings raise questions about acupuncture's purported mechanisms of action. It remains unclear whether acupuncture or our simulated method of acupuncture provide physiologically important stimulation or represent placebo or nonspecific effects  
  Address Center for Health Studies, 1730 Minor Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. cherkin.d@ghc.org  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 45 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 638  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Low Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 162  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Berman, B. M.; Singh, B. B.; Lao, L.; Langenberg, P.; Li, H.; Hadhazy, V.; Bareta, J.; Hochberg, M. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized trial of acupuncture as an adjunctive therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication Rheumatology Abbreviated Journal Rheumatology (Oxford)  
  Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages 346-354  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Analgesia; AcuTrials; Arthritis; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Osteoarthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Pain; RCT; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of acupuncture as an adjunctive therapy to standard care for the relief of pain and dysfunction in elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: Seventy-three patients with symptomatic OA of the knee were randomly assigned to treatment (acupuncture) or standard care (control). Analysis was performed on last score carried forward to account for patients who dropped out before completion. Patients self-scored Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Lequesne indices at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Patients in the control group were offered acupuncture treatment after 12 weeks. The data for these patients are pooled with those from the original acupuncture group for within-group analysis. RESULTS: Patients randomized to acupuncture improved on both WOMAC and Lequesne indices compared to those who received standard treatment alone. Significant differences on total WOMAC Scale were seen at 4 and 8 weeks. There appears to be a slight decline in effect at 4 weeks after cessation of treatment (12 weeks after first treatment). No adverse effects of acupuncture were reported. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that acupuncture is an effective and safe adjunctive therapy to conventional care for patients with OA of the knee  
  Address Complementary Medicine Program, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21207-6697, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 73  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score 63  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 70  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Venzke, L.; Calvert, J. F., Jr.; Gilbertson, B. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized trial of acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms in post-menopausal women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication Complementary therapies in medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 59-66  
  Keywords Climacteric; Postmenopause; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine whether acupuncture would relieve the vasomotor symptoms of post-menopausal women. DESIGN: A randomized, single-blind trial. SETTING: A small city in a rural area of Eastern Oregon. INTERVENTIONS: Women were recruited into the study from the community by advertising or physician referral. All study subjects were in non-surgical menopause and medically stable. Study subjects were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of treatment with either Chinese Traditional Medicine (TCM) acupuncture (n=27) or shallow needle (sham) acupuncture (n=24). OUTCOME MEASURES: Study participants kept a diary recording their hot flashes each day. At baseline, study participants filled out Greene Climacteric Scales and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. These same outcomes were also measured at week 4 of treatment and at 1 week and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of hot flashes and the numeric scores on the Climacteric Scales and the Beck inventories were compared between the verum and shallow needling groups using two-way repeated measures. RESULTS: Both groups of women showed statistically significant improvement on all study parameters. However, there was no difference between the improvement in the shallow needle and verum acupuncture groups. Study subjects were not able to guess which group they had been assigned to. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that both shallow needling and verum acupuncture were effective treatments of post-menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Study subjects were not able to distinguish shallow needling from real TCM acupuncture. Shallow needling may have therapeutic effects in itself reducing its utility as a “placebo” control for verum acupuncture. This result is consistent with other published studies.  
  Address Klamath Pain Clinic, Klamath Falls, OR 97601, USA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 51  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Postmenopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1208  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yong-Xin Sun; Yuan Wang; Xunming Ji; Xiaoguang Wu; Yong Zhao; Yuchuan Ding; Hussain, M.; Fei Yu; Wenbo Zhao; Jianping Jia url  openurl
  Title (up) A Randomized Trial of Chinese Diaoshi Jifa on Treatment of Dizziness in Meniere's Disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Meniere's Disease -- Therapy; Dizziness -- Therapy; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Acupressure -- Methods; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Funding Source; China; Questionnaires; Treatment Outcomes; Descriptive Statistics; Acupuncture Points; Female; Male; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; T-Tests; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Data Analysis Software; Confidence Intervals  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Neurological Surgery,Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876640. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; tables/charts; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Grant Information: This work was partially supported by the Traditional Chinese Medicine Project (JJT2010-22) of Capital Medical Development Foundation, Beijing Outstanding Talents Cultivation Fund (2012D005018000007), and the High-Level Health Techonology Talent Construction Programme of Beijing Municiple Health Bureau (2013-3-092).. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876640 Serial 2395  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Avis, N. E.; Legault, C.; Coeytaux, R. R.; Pian-Smith, M.; Shifren, J. L.; Chen, W.; Valaskatgis, P. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized, controlled pilot study of acupuncture treatment for menopausal hot flashes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Menopause : the journal of the North American Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Hot Flashes; Penetrating Sham; Menopause; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Climacteric  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the feasibility of conducting a randomized trial of the effect of acupuncture in decreasing hot flashes in peri- and postmenopausal women. DESIGN:: Fifty-six women ages 44 to 55 with no menses in the past 3 months and at least four hot flashes per day were recruited from two clinical centers and randomized to one of three treatment groups: usual care (n = 19), sham acupuncture (n = 18), or Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture (n = 19). Acupuncture treatments were scheduled twice weekly for 8 consecutive weeks. The sham acupuncture group received shallow needling in nontherapeutic sites. The Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture group received one of four treatments based on a Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis. Usual care participants were instructed to not initiate any new treatments for hot flashes during the study. Daily diaries were used to track frequency and severity of hot flashes. The mean daily index score was based on the number of mild, moderate, and severe hot flashes. Follow-up analyses were adjusted for baseline values, clinical center, age, and body mass index. RESULTS:: There was a significant decrease in mean frequency of hot flashes between weeks 1 and 8 across all groups (P = 0.01), although the differences between the three study groups were not significant. However, the two acupuncture groups showed a significantly greater decrease than the usual care group (P < 0.05), but did not differ from each other. Results followed a similar pattern for the hot flash index score. There were no significant effects for changes in hot flash interference, sleep, mood, health-related quality of life, or psychological well-being. CONCLUSIONS:: These results suggest either that there is a strong placebo effect or that both traditional and sham acupuncture significantly reduce hot flash frequency  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 16  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 56  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 46  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Coeytaux, R. R.; Kaufman, J. S.; Kaptchuk, T. J.; Chen, W.; Miller, W. C.; Callahan, L. F.; Mann, J. D. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic daily headache Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Headache Abbreviated Journal Headache  
  Volume 45 Issue 9 Pages 1113-1123  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Headache Disorders; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection  
  Abstract Background.-Approximately 4% of adults experience headaches nearly every day. Nonpharmacologic interventions for frequent headaches may be appropriate because medical management alone is often ineffective. Objective.-To assess the efficacy of acupuncture as an adjunct to medical management for chronic daily headache (CDH). Methods.-We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of 74 patients with CDH that compared medical management provided by neurologists to medical management plus 10 acupuncture treatments. Primary outcome measures were daily pain severity and headache-related quality of life (QoL). Results.-Patients who received only medical management did not demonstrate improvement in any of the standardized measures. Daily pain severity scores trended downward but did not differ between treatment groups (P= .60). Relative to medical management only, medical management plus acupuncture was associated with an improvement of 3.0 points (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.9) on the Headache Impact Test and an increase of 8 or more points on the role limitations due to physical problems, social functioning, and general mental health domains of the Short Form 36 Health Survey. Patients who received acupuncture were 3.7 times more likely (CI, 1.7 to 8.1) to report less suffering from headaches at 6 weeks (absolute risk reduction 46%; number needed to treat 2). Conclusion.-Headache-specialty medical management alone was not associated with improved clinical outcomes among our study population. Supplementing medical management with acupuncture, however, resulted in improvements in health-related QoL and the perception by patients that they suffered less from headaches. (Headache 2005;45:1113-1123)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 6 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 74  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Headache
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 204  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Liu, Y.; Azizi, H.; Khorsand, A.; Esmaily, H.; Bahrami, A.; Xiao Zhao, B. url  openurl
  Title (up) A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic low-back pain Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Alternative therapies in health and medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 13-19  
  Keywords RCT; Back Pain, Chronic; Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; LBP; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Time Method Acupuncture; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Eight Confluent Points; CAM Control; Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic low-back pain (cLBP) is a common condition throughout the world, and acupuncture is widely sought for treatment. As clinical evidence for the benefits of acupuncture grows, acupuncture for cLBP is receiving increased recognition and acceptance by both patients and professionals. Time method acupuncture has been previously researched with respect to chronic gastritis. OBJECTIVE: For individuals with cLBP in the current study, the research team examined the efficacy of adding confluent acupoints, related to the daytime period in time method acupuncture, to regular acupuncture and also evaluated the persistence of the benefits of such acupuncture in comparison with regular acupuncture. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled trial (RCT). SETTING: The setting was an outpatient clinic of the Dongzhimen Hospital in Beijing, China. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were Chinese men and women with cLBP. INTERVENTION: Sixty participants were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive acupuncture. The control group received a treatment that followed a routine acupuncture (RA) protocol, while the intervention group received a treatment that followed an RA protocol plus acupuncture in confluent points related to time (TA). OUTCOME MEASURES: The research team measured the change in participants' scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the number of therapy sessions needed, the number of days that participants were absent from work during the treatment period and at 12 wk posttreatment, and the number of pain relapses between the end of treatment and the 4- and 12-wk follow-ups. RESULTS: VAS scores decreased from 69.6 +/- 7.9 to 11.8 +/- 4.9 in the intervention group compared with a decrease from 69.2 +/- 8.0 to 15.7 +/- 10.0 in the control group (P = .001). The intervention group received fewer therapy sessions (8.1 +/- 2.0) than did the control group (10.1 +/- 2.0, P < .001). Compared with the controls, the intervention group showed fewer days absent from work (0.5 vs 1.4; P = .03) and fewer pain relapses (4.0 vs 7.0; P = .04) at the 12-wk follow-up. In the 2 groups combined, VAS decreased from 69.4 +/- 7.9 before the first session of acupuncture to 13.8 +/- 8.0 after the last session (P < .001), and the number of therapy sessions needed for pain relief was 9.1 +/- 2.2. CONCLUSION: Accompanying routine acupuncture with time method acupuncture can enhance the efficacy of treatment and the persistence of its benefits in individuals with cLBP.  
  Address Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Back Pain, Chronic
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 51  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Molassiotis, A.; Bardy, J.; Finnegan-John, J.; Mackereth, P.; Ryder, W. D.; Filshie, J.; Ream, E.; Eaton, D.; Richardson, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture self-needling as maintenance therapy for cancer-related fatigue after therapist-delivered acupuncture Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO Abbreviated Journal Ann Oncol  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Fatigue; Neoplasms; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; No Treatment Control; Breast Cancer; Cancer  
  Abstract Background: Maintenance acupuncture is advocated by clinicians after successful clinic-based acupuncture. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of maintenance acupuncture in the management of cancer-related fatigue (CRF); treatment delivered by therapists or self-acupuncture/self-needling was compared with no maintenance treatment. Methods: Breast cancer patients who participated in a randomized trial of acupuncture for CRF management (reported elsewhere) were re-randomized to receive an additional four acupuncturist-delivered weekly sessions; four self-administered weekly acupuncture sessions (self-needling); or no acupuncture. Primary outcome was general fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory). Mood, quality of life and safety were also assessed. Results: In total, 197 patients were re-randomized, with 65 to therapist-delivered sessions, 67 to self-acupuncture/self-needling and 65 to no further acupuncture. Primary outcome scores were equivalent between the therapist-delivered acupuncture and self-acupuncture (P &gt; 0.05). A non-significant trend in improving fatigue was observed at the end of 4 weeks in the combined acupuncture arms (P = 0.07). There was no impact on mood or quality of life of the further acupuncture sessions at 18 weeks beyond the improvement observed in initial trial. Conclusion: Self-acupuncture is an acceptable, feasible and safe maintenance treatment for patients with CRF. However, overall, maintenance acupuncture did not yield important improvements beyond those observed after an initial clinic-based course of acupuncture.Trial Registration numberNCT00957112.  
  Address School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 197  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Fatigue
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, X.; Tang, Q.; Wang, Y. openurl 
  Title (up) A Research on Treating Post-Stroke Lower Limb Dysfunction by Comprehensive Treatment Type of Study RCT
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 145-148  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Stroke; Paralysis; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Scalp Acupuncture; Other Acupuncture Style; Scalp Clustering Acupuncture; CAM Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1467  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lao, H. openurl 
  Title (up) A Restrospective Study on the Use of Acupuncture for the Prevention of Alcoholic Recidivism Type of Study RCT
  Year 1995 Publication American journal of acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Am J Acupunct  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 29-33  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; AcuTrials; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Auricular Acupuncture; Counseling; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Multimodality; Substance-Related Disorders; Group Acupuncture Style; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment 14 Weeks Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 627  
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Author White, A.; Tough, E.; Cummings, M. url  openurl
  Title (up) A review of acupuncture clinical trials indexed during 2005 Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 39-49  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthralgia; Back Pain; Migraine; Pain; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Pelvic Pain;  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1300  
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Author White, A. R. url  openurl
  Title (up) A review of controlled trials of acupuncture for women's reproductive health care Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 233-236  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Infertility, Female; Pain; Pelvic Pain; Premenstrual Syndrome; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Genital Diseases, Female  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture as a therapy, and acupressure as self-treatment, are increasingly widely used for gynaecological conditions, and this study aims to review the scientific literature on their effectiveness. METHOD: A systematic review of controlled trials of acupuncture or acupressure for gynaecological conditions, published in a European language. Synthesis: No studies in mastalgia, menorrhagia, pelvic pain, premenstrual syndrome or vulvodynia met the inclusion criteria. Four studies, two of which were patient-blinded, of acupuncture or acupressure for dysmenorrhoea suggest that it may have an effect. Three studies of acupuncture given at various stages of infertility treatment are promising, but none was patient-blind. Two studies of acupuncture for menopausal symptoms showed no effect during the treatment period when compared with sham acupuncture, and a third study showed no effect on hypertension in postmenopausal women, though some improvement in symptoms was noted. CONCLUSION: In view of the small number of studies and their variable quality, doubt remains about the effectiveness of acupuncture for gynaecological conditions. Acupuncture and acupressure appear promising for dysmenorrhoea, and acupuncture for infertility, and further studies are justified  
  Address Institute of Health and Social Care Research, Peninsula Medical School, 25 Victoria Park Road, Exeter EX2 4NT, UK. Adrian.White@pms.ac.uk  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Genital Diseases, Female
  Disease Category Genital Diseases, Female OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1290  
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Author Cherkin, D. C.; Sherman, K. J.; Deyo, R. A.; Shekelle, P. G. url  openurl
  Title (up) A review of the evidence for the effectiveness, safety, and cost of acupuncture, massage therapy, and spinal manipulation for back pain Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2003 Publication Annals of internal medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 138 Issue 11 Pages 898-906  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Back Pain; Chiropractic; Cost Effectiveness; Low Back Pain; Massage; Pain; Adverse Effects; Spinal Manipulation; Systematic Review; Meta-Analysis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Few treatments for back pain are supported by strong scientific evidence. Conventional treatments, although widely used, have had limited success. Dissatisfied patients have, therefore, turned to complementary and alternative medical therapies and providers for care for back pain. PURPOSE: To provide a rigorous and balanced summary of the best available evidence about the effectiveness, safety, and costs of the most popular complementary and alternative medical therapies used to treat back pain. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) that were published since 1995 and that evaluated acupuncture, massage therapy, or spinal manipulation for nonspecific back pain and RCTs published since the reviews were conducted. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently extracted data from the reviews (including number of RCTs, type of back pain, quality assessment, and conclusions) and original articles (including type of pain, comparison treatments, sample size, outcomes, follow-up intervals, loss to follow-up, and authors' conclusions). DATA SYNTHESIS: Because the quality of the 20 RCTs that evaluated acupuncture was generally poor, the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating acute or chronic back pain is unclear. The three RCTs that evaluated massage reported that this therapy is effective for subacute and chronic back pain. A meta-regression analysis of the results of 26 RCTs evaluating spinal manipulation for acute and chronic back pain reported that spinal manipulation was superior to sham therapies and therapies judged to have no evidence of a benefit but was not superior to effective conventional treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Initial studies have found massage to be effective for persistent back pain. Spinal manipulation has small clinical benefits that are equivalent to those of other commonly used therapies. The effectiveness of acupuncture remains unclear. All of these treatments seem to be relatively safe. Preliminary evidence suggests that massage, but not acupuncture or spinal manipulation, may reduce the costs of care after an initial course of therapy  
  Address Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative, 1730 Minor Avenue, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA 98101  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 163  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arab, Z.; Shariati, A.R.; Asayesh, H.; Vakili, M.A.; Bahrami-Taghanaki, H.; Azizi, H. url  openurl
  Title (up) A sham-controlled trial of acupressure on the quality of sleep and life in haemodialysis patients Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Acupuncture in Medicine  
  Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 2-6  
  Keywords Acupressure; ANALYSIS of variance; CHI-squared test; CORRELATION (Statistics); HEALTH surveys; Hemodialysis; QUALITY assurance; QUALITY of life; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; Sleep; SLEEP disorders; Statistics; DATA analysis; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; DATA analysis -- Software; MANN Whitney U Test; KRUSKAL-Wallis Test  
  Abstract Background Sleep disorder in haemodialysis patients can lead to disturbance in their psychosocial function and interpersonal relations, and reduced quality of life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acupressure on the quality of sleep of haemodialysis patients. Methods In a randomised controlled trial, 108 haemodialysis patients were randomly divided into three groups: true acupressure, placebo acupressure, and no treatment. The two acupressure groups received treatment three times a week for 4 weeks during dialysis. Routine care only was provided for the no treatment group. The main study outcome was sleep quality. Results The total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score decreased significantly from 11.9±3.13 to 6.2±1.93 in the true acupressure group, from 11.3±3.69 to 10.6±3.82 in the sham acupressure group, and from 10.9±4.10 to 10.7±3.94 in the no treatment group. There was a significant difference between groups (p<0.001). Conclusions Acupressure seems to have a positive effect on the sleep quality in haemodialysis patients.  
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  Notes Accession Number: 113683039; Source Information: Feb2016, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p2; Subject Term: ACUPRESSURE; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: HEALTH surveys; Subject Term: HEMODIALYSIS; Subject Term: QUALITY assurance; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SLEEP; Subject Term: SLEEP disorders; Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: KRUSKAL-Wallis Test; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 5p; ; Illustrations: 5 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2261  
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Author Foroughipour, M.; Golchian, A. R.; Kalhor, M.; Akhlaghi, S.; Farzadfard, M. T.; Azizi, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A sham-controlled trial of acupuncture as an adjunct in migraine prophylaxis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2014 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 12-16  
  Keywords Headache Disorders; Migraine; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control; Pain  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Migraine is one of the most common types of headache, with significant socioeconomic effects. Prophylactic drugs are used to prevent migraine headaches but are unpromising. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of adding acupuncture to conventional migraine prophylaxis. METHODS: One hundred patients with migraine (41 male, 59 female), in whom prophylactic drugs had not produced a fall of at least 50% in the number of attacks, entered the study. The patients were randomised into two groups, sham and true acupuncture. The patients in both groups continued their prophylactic treatment and received 12 sessions of either true or sham acupuncture. Each session was 30 min and was repeated three times a week. The number of headaches in the two groups was compared at baseline, and at the end of four successive months. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the frequency of attacks between the two groups before intervention. After 1 month, the frequency of attacks each month decreased from 5.1 (0.8) to 3.4 (1.2) in the true acupuncture group, and from 5.0 (0.8) to 4.4 (1.1) in the sham acupuncture group (a significant difference, p<0.001). The frequency continued to decrease in month 2 but increased in months 3 and 4; however, it was still significantly lower than baseline, and the difference remained significant after month 4. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is applicable as an adjunct to prophylactic drugs in migraineurs in whom the number of attacks does not fall with prophylactic medication.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, , Mashhad, Iran.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 16 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 332  
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Author Fleckenstein, J.; Lill, C.; Ludtke, R.; Gleditsch, J.; Rasp, G.; Irnich, D. url  openurl
  Title (up) A single point acupuncture treatment at large intestine meridian: a randomized controlled trial in acute tonsillitis and pharyngitis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication The Clinical journal of pain Abbreviated Journal Clin J Pain  
  Volume 25 Issue 7 Pages 624-631  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pharyngitis; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Sham Control; Sham Laser; TCM Acupuncture Style; Tonsillitis; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: One out of 4 patients visiting a general practitioner reports of a sore throat associated with pain on swallowing. This study was established to examine the immediate pain alleviating effect of a single point acupuncture treatment applied to the large intestine meridian of patients with sore throat. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty patients with acute tonsillitis and pharyngitis were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial. They either received acupuncture, or sham laser acupuncture, directed to the large intestine meridian section between acupuncture points LI 8 and LI 10. The main outcome measure was the change of pain intensity on swallowing a sip of water evaluated by a visual analog scale 15 minutes after treatment. A credibility assessment regarding the respective treatment was performed. RESULTS: The pain intensity for the acupuncture group before and immediately after therapy was 5.6+/-2.8 and 3.0+/-3.0, and for the sham group 5.6+/-2.5 and 3.8+/-2.5, respectively. Despite the articulation of a more pronounced improvement among the acupuncture group, there was no significant difference between groups (Delta=0.9, confidence interval: -0.2-2.0; P=0.12; analysis of covariance). Patients' satisfaction was high in both treatment groups. The study was prematurely terminated due to a subsequent lack of suitable patients. DISCUSSION: A single acupuncture treatment applied to a selected area of the large intestine meridian was no more effective in the alleviation of pain associated with clinical sore throat than sham laser acupuncture applied to the same area. Hence, clinically relevant improvement could be achieved. Pain alleviation might partly be due to the intense palpation of the large intestine meridian. The benefit of a comprehensive acupuncture treatment protocol in this condition should be subject to further trials  
  Address Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Munich, Pettenkoferstr 8A, 80336 Munchen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Tonsillitis and Phayrngitis
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 328  
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Author Waite, N. R.; Clough, J. B. url  openurl
  Title (up) A single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a simple acupuncture treatment in the cessation of smoking Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal Br J Gen Pract  
  Volume 48 Issue 433 Pages 1487-1490  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Auricular Acupressure; Auricular Electroacupuncture; Ear Seeds; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Non Specific Acupoint Control; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; Smoking Cessation; Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable disease and premature death. Physicians should play an active role in the control of smoking by encouraging cessation and helping the smoker to choose the most suitable aid to cessation. AIM: To evaluate a simple, ear acupuncture treatment for the cessation of smoking. METHOD: Randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 78 currently smoking volunteers from the general public. Volunteers attended an acupuncture clinic in a general practice setting and were given a single treatment of electroacupuncture using two needles at either an active or a placebo site plus self-retained ear seeds for two weeks. The major outcome measure was biochemically validated total cessation of smoking at six months. RESULTS: A total of 12.5% of the active treatment group compared with 0% of the placebo group ceased smoking at six months (P = 0.055, 95% confidence interval -0.033 to 0.323). CONCLUSION: This simple ear electroacupuncture treatment was significantly more effective in helping volunteers to quit smoking than placebo treatment  
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  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 24 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 78  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score 77  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1225  
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Author Wang, C. P.; Kao, C. H.; Chen, W. K.; Lo, W. Y.; Hsieh, C. L. url  openurl
  Title (up) A Single-Blinded, Randomized Pilot Study Evaluating Effects of Electroacupuncture in Diabetic Patients with Symptoms Suggestive of Gastroparesis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages 833-839  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Diabetes Mellitus; Gastroparesis; Dyspepsia; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Penetrating Sham; Nausea; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting;  
  Abstract Abstract Background and objectives: The current pharmacological management of diabetic gastroparesis remains difficult. Acupuncture has been widely used for gastrointestinal symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on solid gastric emptying time, serum gastrin, motilin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), fasting and postprandial blood glucose, and symptoms in patients with diabetic gastroparesis. Interventions: EA at the Zusanli (ST 36) and Hegu (LI 4) points and sham EA as control were administered by an experienced and licensed acupuncturist. Design: This was a pilot study with a randomized, single-blinded design. Subjects and setting: Nineteen (19) patients with type 2 diabetes who had had symptoms of gastroparesis for more than 3 months were included in the trial and randomized into two groups. Each group received EA (n = 9) or sham EA (n = 10) consisting of 4 sessions over 2 weeks. Outcome measures: Symptom severity was evaluated using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) at baseline, at the end of treatment, and 2 weeks after the end of the trial; solid-phase gastric half-emptying time was measured by scintigraphy; in addition, serum gastrin, motilin, PP, fasting, and postprandial blood glucose levels were also measured. Results: Gastric half-emptying time in 9 patients with diabetic gastroparesis was significantly shortened by EA treatment (143.8 +/- 55.9 minutes versus 98.8 +/- 28.6 minutes, p < 0.03). Half-emptying time did not change (98.9 +/- 26.4 minutes versus 90.9 +/- 24.8 minutes, p > 0.05) in the sham EA group. Symptom severity, as measured by GCSI total score, improved significantly both at the end of treatment (2.38 +/- 0.56 versus 1.48 +/- 0.19, p < 0.001) and 2 weeks after the end of the trial (2.38 +/- 0.56 versus 1.65 +/- 0.44, p < 0.01) when compared with the baseline in the EA group, but did not change from baseline with sham EA treatment. There were no significant changes in fasting and postprandial blood glucose, serum gastrin, motilin, and PP in both groups. No significant adverse events occurred. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that short-term EA at the Zusanli and Hegu points effectively reduces the dyspeptic symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis and accelerates solid gastric emptying. Sustained improvement in dyspeptic symptoms was observed at 2 weeks after the end of the trial. Its potential for treating gastroparesis may be explored, and a larger trial is required to draw definitive conclusions  
  Address Department of Emergency Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan  
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  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 23  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Gastroparesis
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1233  
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Author Yeh, M. L.; Chang, C. Y.; Chu, N. F.; Chen, H. H. url  openurl
  Title (up) A six-week acupoint stimulation intervention for quitting smoking Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 37 Issue 5 Pages 829-836  
  Keywords Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; AcuTrials; Smoking Cessation; Acu Versus Sham; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Auricular Electroacupuncture; Auricular Acupressure; Ear Seeds; NADA Protocol Acupuncture Style; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse;  
  Abstract This study creates a six-week acupoint stimulation program for quitting smoking by conducting an experimental research design and then evaluating its effects. A total of 59 smokers, 28 +/- 7.6 years of mean age, volunteered to participate and were randomly assigned to the experimental or sham group. The current investigation administered anti-smoking acupoints to the experimental group for six weeks, whereas the sham group used sham acupoints for six weeks. Before and after the six-week intervention, the participants completed questionnaires and offered blood samples. This research collected data of demographic factors, serum cotinine, carbon monoxide exhalation, daily tobacco consumption, and quit smoking rate of participants before and after the six-week intervention. After the intervention, it showed no significant differences in the serum level of cotinine and carbon monoxide exhalation between the two groups. The quit rate in the experimental group was 13.3% and 13.7% in the sham group. However, daily tobacco consumption was 10 cigarettes in the experimental group and 11.21 cigarettes in the sham group. This experimental study used the sham group as the control, resulting in no statistically significant findings. Future studies need more evidence-based research on the exact effect or placebo effect of acupoint stimulation and the appropriate design for sham acupoint, to examine quitting effect using acupoint stimulation in adult smokers.  
  Address Department of Nursing, National Taipei College of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan.  
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  Language Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 79  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Tobacco Use Disorder
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1379  
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