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Author Zhu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Deng, Z. openurl 
  Title (up) Acupoint Injection Combined with Auricular Point Taping in Treating 158 Cases of Epigastric Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 27-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Abdominal Pain; Epigastric Pain; Rct; Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture Point Injection; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Ear Seeds; Auricular Acupressure; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical  
  Abstract Epigastric pain is a disease characterized by the main manifestation of recurrent intense abdominal pain. From 2008 to 2010, we undertook acupoint injection of atropine combined with auricular point taping to 158 of 288 patients with epigastric pain, and achieved good clinical curative effects. The reports are as follows.  
  Address Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants 288  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Disease OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 2/12/2015; Date Modified: 6/4/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Abdominal Pain; Luxian Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China b Juxian People's Hospital, Shandong, China. e-mail: captainmollo@gmail.com Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1766  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, Hui-juan; Yang, Guo-yan; Wang, Yu-yi; Liu, Jian-ping url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupoint Stimulation for Acne: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal Medical Acupuncture  
  Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 173-194  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Skin Diseases; Acne Vulgaris; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupoint stimulation- including acupunture, moxibustion, cupping, acupoint injection, and acupoint catgut embedding- has shown a beneficial effect for treating acne.. However, comprehensive evaluation of current clinical evidence is lacking. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of all acupoint stimulation techniques used to treat acne vulgaris. DESIGN: A systematic review was conducted. It included only randomized controlled trials on acupoint stimulation for acne. Six electronic databases were searched for English and Chinese language studies. All searches ended in May 2012. Studies were selected for elegibility and assessed for quality. RevMan 5.1 software was used for data analysis with an effect estimate presented as risk ratios (RR) or mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). PATIENTS: Studies with subjects who were diagnosed with acne vulgaris, or papulopapustular, inflammatory, adolescent, or ploymorphic acne – regardless of gender, age, and ethnicity – were included. INTERVENTION: Interventions included any acupoint stumuation technique – such as acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, acupoint injection, acupoint catgut embedding -compared with no treatment, placebo, or conventional pharmaceutical medication. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Reduction of signs and symptoms and presence of adverse effects were examined. RESULTS: Forty-three trials involving 3453 patients with acne were included. The methodological quality of trials was gernally poor in terms of randomization, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Meta-analyses showed significant differences in increasing the number of cured patients between acupuncture plus herbal medicine and herbal medicine alone (RR: 1.60; 95% CI; 1.19-2.14; P=0.002), and between acupuncture plus herbal facial mask and herbal facial mask alone (RR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.29-3.55; P=0.003). Cupping theraopy was significantly better than pharmaceutical medications for increasing the number of cured patients (RR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.45-3.07; P<0.0001). Serious adverse events were not reported in all included trials. CONCLUSIONS: Acupoint stimulation therapies combined with other treatments appears to be effective for acne. However, further large, rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm these findings. KEY WORDS: Acne; Acupoint Stimulation, Systematic Review;  
  Address Centre for Evidence-based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 88# Mail Box, Bei San Huan Dong Lu 11, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100029, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Acne Vulgaris
  Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, H.; Li, X.; Han, M.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupoint Stimulation for Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2013 Issue Pages 1-15  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Fibromyalgia; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acupuncture; Cupping; Electroacupuncture; Herbal Injection; Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract Background: Acupoint stimulation is popular for treatment of fibromyalgia though there is lack of comprehensive evaluation of current clinical evidence for its effect and safety. Objective. To systematically review the beneficial effects and safety of acupoint stimulation for fibromyalgia. Methods: We searched six electronic databases for randomized trials on acupoint stimulation for treatment of fibromyalgia. Two authors extracted data and assessed the trial quality independently. RevMan 5.2 software was used for data analyses with effect estimate presented as (standard) mean difference and a 95% confidence interval. We defined minimum, medium, and large SMD effect sizes as 0.3, 0.5, and 0.75. Results: 16 RCTs with 1081 participants were involved in this review. Only two trials were evaluated as low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture alone or combined with cupping therapy was superior to conventional medications on reducing pain scores and/or the number of tender points. However, acupuncture showed no better than sham acupuncture on pain reduction. There was no serious adverse event reported to be related to acupoint stimulation. Conclusions: Acupoint stimulation appears to be effective in treating fibromyalgia compared with medications. However, further large, rigorously designed trials are warranted due to insufficient methodological rigor in the included trials.  
  Address Center for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fibromyalgia
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 106  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hunter, M. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupoint stimulation for fibromyalgia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists Abbreviated Journal J Acupuncture Assoc Charter Physiother  
  Volume 30 Issue Pages 110-111  
  Keywords Acupuncture -- Evaluation; Fibromyalgia -- Rehabilitation; Human; Systematic Review  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107836770. Language: English. Entry Date: 20141104. Revision Date: 20150819. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Physical Therapy. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107836770 Serial 2352  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rong-Tsung Lin; Chung-Yuh Tzeng; Yu-Chen Lee; Chen, Y.-I.; Tai-Hao Hsu; Jaung-Geng Lin; Shih-Liang Chang url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupoint-Specific, Frequency-Dependent, and Improved Insulin Sensitivity Hypoglycemic Effect of Electroacupuncture Applied to Drug-Combined Therapy Studied by a Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Electroacupuncture; Hypoglycemia; Insulin Resistance -- Therapy; Insulin Resistance -- Physiopathology; Randomized Controlled Trials; Animal Studies; Models, Biological; Rats; Insulin Resistance -- Chemically Induced; Combined Modality Therapy; Serotonin -- Metabolism; Nitric Oxide -- Metabolism; PubMed; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 -- Physiopathology; Dose-Response Relationship; Hypoglycemic Agents -- Therapeutic Use; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 -- Physiopathology  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Medicinal Botanicals and Health Application, Da-Yeh University, No. 168, University Road, Dacun, Changhua County 51591, Taiwan; School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103876533. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150130. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; pictorial; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Biomedical; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 101215021. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103876533 Serial 2396  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abraham, J. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupressure and acupuncture in preventing and managing postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Perioperative Practice Abbreviated Journal J Perioper Pract  
  Volume 18 Issue 12 Pages 543-551  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Emesis; Nausea; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; Systematic Review; Vomiting; AcuTrials  
  Abstract This literature review sets out to investigate the effectiveness of acupressure and acupuncture in preventing and managing postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in adult patients. PONV is problematic, affecting patient satisfaction, delayed discharge and even patient re-admission. Current treatment of PONV constitutes a variety of drug therapies, which are only partially effective. With the integration of complementary and alternative medicines in healthcare, this review examined 10 research studies investigating the use of acupressure and acupuncture in treating PONV. Three studies found acupressure to be effective in preventing PONV. However, population samples were small and the research designs had numerous anomalies. Overall the article suggests that acupuncture and acupressure are ineffective in preventing and managing PONV in adult patients. Further investigation of the effectiveness of acupressure and acupuncture, combined with current drug therapies, using well designed and adequately powered studies is needed. Published studies predominantly examined the use of P6 as the pressure point. Further studies should examine other 'acupoint' sites, to ascertain whether these are effective dependent upon the operative site  
  Address Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Coventry University, Coventry,  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Post Operative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 1  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wendt, T.; Best, J.; Edwards, M.; Spooner, A.; Rapchuk, I.; O'Connel, L.; McCabe, D.; Rickard, C.; Fraser, J.; Doi, S.; Cooke, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for post-operative nausea and vomiting: A pilot randomised controlled trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Australian Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Aust Crit Care  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 49-49  
  Keywords Acupressure -- Methods; Postoperative Complications -- Prevention and Control; Nausea and Vomiting -- Prevention and Control; Human; Randomized Controlled Trials; Surgical Patients; Pilot Studies; Acupuncture Points; Intensive Care Units; Australia; Random Assignment; Surveys; Male; Female; Descriptive Statistics; Heart Surgery  
  Abstract Despite optimal pharmacological interventions, post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is prevalent in patients following surgery. Vomiting is ranked the most undesirable outcome experienced by patients post-operatively. Acupressure has been recommended for the prevention of PONV but evidence to date is limited in the cardiac surgical population. This study aims to assess the feasibility and the efficacy of pericardium channel (PC) 6 acupoint stimulation versus placebo on PONV in cardiac surgical patients. This two-group, randomised, controlled, pilot trial was conducted at a tertiary referral intensive care unit in Brisbane. Twenty-nine patients were randomly assigned to receive the acupressure (bead) or placebo (non-bead) wristband. Wristbands were applied to both wrists post-operatively in the ICU and were removed at 36 h. Incidence of PONV, and need for rescue antiemetics were assessed up to 36 h. A Quality of Recovery (QoR) survey was conducted at day four. Thirteen patients were randomised to the acupressure group (8 males), and 16 patients to the placebo group (13 male). The mean Apfel risk score (predictor of PONV 0 = low risk and 4 = high risk) was two in both groups. The mean anaesthesia and cardiopulmonary bypass times were longer in the acupressure group (287.50min, 102.50min) than the placebo group (255.71 min, 78.86min). Although patient reports of nausea were similar between groups (46%, 50%), only 15% of patients vomited in the acupressure group as opposed to 53% in the placebo group. The use of rescue antiemetic therapy did not differ between groups (75%, 73%). The mean QoR score at day four was the same between groups (74.50,74.31). These interim results indicate that PC 6 acupoint stimulation is associated with less vomiting up to 36 h post cardiac surgery. A larger sample is required to determine the feasibility of conducting a multi-centre study.  
  Address School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 107786894. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150603. Revision Date: 20150712. Publication Type: Journal Article; abstract; research; randomized controlled trial. Journal Subset: Australia & New Zealand; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Critical Care. NLM UID: 9207852. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 107786894 Serial 2322  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2576  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2617  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2651  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2692  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2740  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2781  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2822  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2863  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liang, Y.; Lenon, G.B.; Yang, A.W.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupressure for respiratory allergic diseases: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 413-420  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Asthma/complications/*therapy; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Rhinitis, Allergic/complications/*therapy; Chinese medicine; acupuncture; allergic rhinitis; asthma; hay fever  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of acupressure for the management of respiratory allergic diseases by systematically reviewing randomised controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: A total of 13 electronic English and Chinese databases were searched until July 2017. Two authors extracted data and evaluated risk of bias independently. Review Manager V.5.3 was employed for data analysis. RESULTS: The literature search identified 186 papers, of which only four of met the inclusion criteria: two for allergic rhinitis (AR) and two for asthma. High and unclear risk of bias existed across all the included studies. The findings demonstrated that acupressure greater effects on the relief of nasal symptoms of AR compared with 1% ephedrine nasal drop plus thermal therapy. With either Western medicine or Chinese herbal medicine as a cointervention, one study indicated that acupressure plus salbutamol was led to a significantly greater improvement of pulmonary function for patients with asthma compared with salbutamol only. However, the remaining two studies indentified no significant differences in any outcome measures between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: No reliable conclusions regarding the effects of acupressure on AR and asthma could be drawn by this review due to the small number of available trials with significant heterogeneity of study design and high/unclear risk of bias. Further, more rigorously designed RCTs are needed. Acupressure seems safe for symptomatic relief of AR and asthma, although larger studies are required to be able to robustly confirm its safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12617001106325; Pre-results.  
  Address Discipline of Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29113981 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2945  
Permanent link to this record
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