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Author Shenkman, Z.; Holzman, R. S.; Kim, C.; Ferrari, L. R.; DiCanzio, J.; Highfield, E. S.; Van Keuren, K.; Kaptchuk, T.; Kenna, M. A.; Berde, C. B.; Rockoff, M. A. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupressure-acupuncture antiemetic prophylaxis in children undergoing tonsillectomy Type of Study RCT
  Year 1999 Publication Abbreviated Journal Anesthesiology  
  Volume 90 Issue 5 Pages 1311-1316  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Sham + Usual Care; Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Anesthesia; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Pain; Pediatrics; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Acupressure; Sham Control; Tonsillectomy; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Vomiting  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture or acupressure at the Nei-Guan (P.6) point on the wrist produces antiemetic effects in awake but not anesthetized patients. The authors studied whether a combined approach using preoperative acupressure and intra- and postoperative acupuncture can prevent emesis following tonsillectomy in children. METHODS: Patients 2-12 yr of age were randomly assigned to study or placebo groups. Two Acubands with (study) and two without (placebo) spherical beads were applied bilaterally on the P.6 points; non-bead- and bead-containing Acubands, respectively, were applied on the sham points. All Acubands were applied before any drug administration. After anesthetic induction, acupuncture needles were substituted for the beads and remained in situ until the next day. All points were covered with opaque tape to prevent study group identification. A uniform anesthetic technique was used; postoperative pain was managed initially with morphine and later with acetaminophen and codeine. Emesis, defined as retching or vomiting, was assessed postoperatively. Ondansetron was administered only after two emetic episodes at least 2 min apart. Droperidol was added if emesis persisted. RESULTS: One hundred patients were enrolled in the study. There were no differences in age, weight, follow-up duration, or perioperative opioid administration between groups. Retching occurred in 26% of the study patients and in 28% of the placebo patients; 51 and 55%, respectively, vomited; and 60 and 59%, respectively, did either. There were no significant differences between the groups. Redness occurred in 8.5% of acupuncture sites. CONCLUSION: Perioperative acupressure and acupuncture did not diminish emesis in children following tonsillectomy  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. z.shenkman@ipc.co.il  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score 64  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1042  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, Z. l. openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture + medication versus medication alone in lowering intracranial pressure in apoplectic patients Type of Study RCT
  Year 1996 Publication International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal Int J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 17-21  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Stroke; TCM Acupuncture Style; Hemiplegia  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Stroke
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1454  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gemma, M.; Nicelli, E.; Gioia, L.; Moizo, E.; Beretta, L.; Calvi, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture accelerates recovery after general anesthesia: a prospective randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Integr Med  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 99-104  
  Keywords RCT; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Anesthesia Recovery Period; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture anesthesia was created in the 1950's in China and continues to be used there today during most major surgeries. It is widely used in China for such complex operations as brain, heart, and abdominal surgery. It is popular in China because it is economical, practical, and beneficial to the patients. With acupuncture anesthesia there is less bleeding during surgery and there is also quicker post-operative recovery. OBJECTIVE: This randomized prospective study aims at comparing the effect of two acupoints (Yongquan, KI1 and Renzhong, DU26) with sham acupuncture and no acupuncture on the time to recovery of consciousness after general anesthesia by means of the Bispectral Index monitor (BIS). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: This is a prospective randomized controlled study. We randomly assigned 50 patients to 5 groups during recovery from surgical anesthesia. Four groups had acupuncture on KI1 (group A), DU26 (groups B), both KI1 and DU26 (group C), and sham points (group D), and one had no acupuncture (group E). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bispectral Index (BIS), time to spontaneous eye opening, time to tracheal extubation, and time to following commands were measured as the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Time to spontaneous eye opening differed among groups (P=0.002), as well as time to tracheal extubation (P<0.000 1) and time to following commands (P=0.000 6). BIS values differed significantly among groups both 5 and 10 min after the end of anesthesia (P<0.000 1 and P=0.000 4, respectively). BIS values of groups D and E were lower than those of the other groups and those of group C were higher. The same pattern was observed also 15 and 30 min after the end of anesthesia, although the difference among groups was not significant at these time points (P=0.164 and P=0.104, respectively). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture on DU26 and KI1 accelerates recovery of consciousness after general anesthesia. Moreover, a possible synergistic effect of DU26 and KI1 is suggested. This issue may play a role in the optimization of operating room management and raise interest about the usefulness of acupuncture on unconsciousness states of different nature.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia and Neurointensive Care, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 1 Day Frequency N/A Number of Participants 50  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Postoperative Recovery Time
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25797640 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaudernack, L. C.; Forbord, S.; Hole, E. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture administered after spontaneous rupture of membranes at term significantly reduces the length of birth and use of oxytocin. A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand  
  Volume 85 Issue 11 Pages 1348-1353  
  Keywords Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Delivery, Obstetric; Labor Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Women's Health; Labor, Obstetric; Analgesia, Obstetrical  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The objective was to investigate whether acupuncture could be a reasonable option for augmentation in labor after spontaneous rupture of membranes at term and to look for possible effects on the progress of labor. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial 100 healthy parturients, with spontaneous rupture of membranes at term, were assigned to receive either acupuncture or no acupuncture. The main response variables were the duration of active labor, the amount of oxytocin given, and number of inductions. RESULTS: Duration of labor was significantly reduced (mean difference 1.7 h, p=0.03) and there was significant reduction in the need for oxytocin infusion to augment labor in the study group compared to the control group (odds ratio 2.0, p=0.018). We also discovered that the participants in the acupuncture group who needed labor induction had a significantly shorter duration of active phase than the ones induced in the control group (mean difference 3.6 h, p=0.002). These findings remained significant also when multiple regression was performed, controlling for potentially confounding factors like parity, epidural analgesia, and birth weight. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture may be a good alternative or complement to pharmacological methods in the effort to facilitate birth and provide normal delivery for women with prelabor rupture of membranes  
  Address Kvinneklinikken, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. lisegaudernack@yahoo.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 100  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Analgesia, Obstetrical
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score 81  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 367  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reindl, T. K.; Geilen, W.; Hartmann, R.; Wiebelitz, K. R.; Kan, G.; Wilhelm, I.; Lugauer, S.; Behrens, C.; Weiberlenn, T.; Hasan, C.; Gottschling, S.; Wild-Bergner, T.; Henze, G.; Driever, P. H. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric oncology Interim results of a multicenter crossover study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages 172-176  
  Keywords Acu Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Chemotherapy; Cross-Over Design; Emesis; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Nausea; Neoplasms; Pain; Pediatrics; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Vomiting; Vomiting, Anticipatory; Cancer  
  Abstract GOALS: In this multicenter crossover study, our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and acceptance of acupuncture as a supportive antiemetic approach during highly emetogenic chemotherapy in pediatric oncology. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven children receiving several courses of highly emetogenic chemotherapy for treatment of solid tumors were included. Randomization allocated patients to start chemotherapy either with antiemetic medication plus acupuncture or antiemetic medication alone. During all study courses, patients continued to receive their programmed and additional antiemetic medication as needed. Acupuncture was given at day 1 of chemotherapy and at subsequent days on patient's demand. The amount of baseline and additional antiemetic medication during chemotherapy was documented. Patients maintained a daily diary of vomiting episodes and completed an evaluated nausea score at the end of every course. Their body weight was taken before and after a chemotherapy course. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-two courses with or without acupuncture were compared. The benefits of acupuncture in adolescents with respect to the reduction of additional antiemetic medication were observed. Acupuncture enabled patients to experience higher levels of alertness during chemotherapy and reduced nausea and vomiting. Except for needle pain, no side effects were noted. Patient's acceptance of acupuncture was high. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that acupuncture might reduce antiemetic medication and episodes of vomiting in pediatric oncology  
  Address Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany, tobias.reindl@charite.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 11  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Vomiting, Anticipatory
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score 76  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 980  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, H.; Ernst, E. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture analgesia during surgery: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 114 Issue 3 Pages 511-517  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Analgesia; Anesthesia; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Systematic Review  
  Abstract The aim of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture as an adjunctive analgesic method to standard anaesthetic procedures for surgery and to determine whether acupuncture has any analgesic-sparing effect. Electronic literature searches for randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture during surgery were performed in seven electronic databases. No language restrictions were imposed. All included studies were rated according to their methodological quality and validity. As the studies were clinically heterogeneous, no meta-analyses were performed. The evidence was classified according to four levels: strong, moderate, limited, or inconclusive. Nineteen RCTs were identified. Seven of them suggested that acupuncture is efficacious. Of nine high-quality RCTs, two studies had positive outcomes. There was no significant association between study quality and direction of outcome. One of eight high-validity trials reported a positive outcome and there was a significant relationship between validity and direction of outcome. The evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no acupuncture as an adjunct to standard anaesthetic procedures is therefore inconclusive. Strong evidence exists that real acupuncture is not significantly different from placebo acupuncture. For an analgesic-sparing effect of acupuncture, evidence remains inconclusive. In conclusion, this review does not support the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to standard anaesthetic procedures during surgery  
  Address Department of Medical Sciences, Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, KyungHee University, Yongin, South Korea; Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Exeter EX2 4NT, UK; Department of Meridiano  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain, Intraoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 640  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zheng, Z.; Feng, S.J.; Costa, C. d.; Li, C.G.; Lu, D.; Xue, C.C. openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture analgesia for temporal summation of experimental pain: a randomised controlled study Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Eur J Pain Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pain  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages 725-31  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Temporal summation of pain, a phenomenon of the central nervous system (CNS), represents enhanced painful sensation or reduced pain threshold upon repeated stimulation. This pain model has been used to evaluate the analgesic effect of various medications on the CNS. AIMS: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects and characteristics of analgesia induced by electroacupuncture (EA), manual acupuncture (MA) and non-invasive sham-acupuncture (SA) in healthy humans on temporal summation of pain. METHODS: Thirsty-six pain-free volunteers were randomised into one of the three groups EA (2/100 Hz), MA or SA. Acupuncture intervention was on ST36 and ST40 on the dominant leg delivered by an acupuncturist blinded to the outcome assessment. Both subjects and the evaluator were blinded to the treatment allocation. Pain thresholds to a single pulse (single pain threshold, SPT) and repeated pulses electrical stimulation (temporal summation thresholds, TST) were measured before, 30 min after and 24h after each treatment. RESULTS: The baseline values of three groups were comparable. Compared to SA, EA significantly increased both SPT and TST immediately after the treatment on the treatment leg as well as 24h after on both the treatment and non-treatment legs (ANOVA, p<0.05). MA also increased SPT and TST, but the changes were not significantly different from those induced by SA. CONCLUSION: EA induces bilateral, segmentally distributed and prolong analgesia on both SPT and TST, indicating a non-centrally specific effect. This effect needs to be verified with heat or mechanical model and in pain patients.  
  Address Health Innovations Research Institute, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Vic 3083, Australia. zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2009 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up 2 Days Frequency N/A Number of Participants 36  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/22/2015; Date Modified: 10/8/2015; Priority: Normal; Health Innovations Research Institute, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Vic 3083, Australia. zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=20045360 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1854  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stewart, D.; Thomson, J.; Oswald, I. openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture analgesia: an experimental investigation Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 1977 Publication Br Med J Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 6053 Pages 67-70  
  Keywords  
  Abstract A study was designed to establish whether acupuncture has any analgesic properties beyond those of suggestion. In three one-hour experimental sessions the increases in detection thresholds and tolerances for thermal pain at six body locations on 12 subjects were compared. A control session (without needles) was followed by one session in which electrically stimulated needles were inserted in accord with Chinese practice, and another in which the needles were inserted to avoid all recognised acupuncture “points.” Acupuncture was significantly more effective than suggestion in raising overall body pain thresholds but just below significance for tolerances. A significant disproportionate effect on the epigastrium, predicted by the choice of acupuncture points, was found for tolerances but not thresholds.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category New Articles to Enter OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 5/28/2015; Date Modified: 5/28/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=318897 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1635  
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Author Smith, C.; Fogarty, S.; Touyz, S.; Madden, S.; Buckett, G.; Hay, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Acupressure and Massage Health Outcomes for Patients with Anorexia Nervosa: Findings from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial and Patient Interviews Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pilot Study; Mental Disorders; Eating Disorders; Anorexia Nervosa; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Acupressure; Massage; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; CAM Control  
  Abstract Abstract Objectives: This study examined the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of acupuncture compared with an active control in an inpatient setting, to examine individuals' experience of the interventions, clinical outcomes from the trial, and to integrate data to explain the trial findings. Design: This was a pilot randomized controlled trial with in-depth interviews with trial participants. Setting: The study was conducted at a private medical facility in Sydney, Australia. Subjects: Twenty-six (26) patients with anorexia nervosa who were medically stable were the subjects. Interventions: Treatment as usual was administered, and the intervention was delivered twice a week for the first 3 weeks, followed by weekly treatment for three weeks. The acupuncture group received acupuncture at the points Hegu (LI4), Zusanli (ST36), Neiguan (PC6), Taichong (LR3), Yanglingquan (GB34), and additional points based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis. The control group received acupressure and massage. Acupressure involved consciously and gradually directing pressure to the center of the point being worked on. Outcome measures: Clinical outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks following completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was body-mass index (BMI), and secondary outcomes included eating disorder psychopathology, anxiety, and depression. A semistructured interview was conducted asking questions about their interaction with the practitioner, what happened, how they felt, whether it made them feel differently, and what they attributed any change to. Results: We found timely recruitment with the population recruited within a 5-month period. Study dropouts were 23% and treatment compliance was moderate, but acceptable for this challenging population. Participants in the control group demonstrated reduced eating concerns. Participants described both interventions positively, and experienced a sense of calmness and relaxation. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure and massage may improve the patient's subjective sense of wellbeing, and further research is needed.  
  Address 1 Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, University of Western Sydney , Penrich, New South Wales, Australia .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 26  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Anorexia Nervosa
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1077  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McKeon, C.; Smith, C.; Hardy, J.; Chang, E. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Acupressure for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal Aust J Acupunct Chin Med  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 2-27  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neoplasms; Chemotherapy Side Effects; Acupuncture; Acupressure; Systematic Review; Nausea; Vomiting; Emesis; CINV; Cancer; Antineoplastic Agents  
  Abstract Background: Control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) has improved with advances in antiemetics, such as NK1antagonists. Despite these advances, patients still experience these symptoms, and expert panels encourage additional methods to reduce these symptoms. Objectives: The objective was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure on acute and delayed CINV in cancer patients. Search strategy: The following databases were searched: AMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry, and Science Direct. The search was undertaken from the inception of the database to January 2012. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupoint stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation or acupressure (excluding laser, point injection and non-invasive electrostimulation) and assessing chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, or both. Data collection and analysis: Data was provided by publications of original trials and pooled. Standardised mean differences with confidence incidences were calculated. Main results: Seven trials were pooled for acupuncture and six for acupressure. Acupuncture reduced the frequency of acute vomiting (mean difference [MD] -7.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] -9.07 to -5.72), but did not reduce acute nausea severity or frequency compared to control. Delayed symptoms for acupuncture were not reported. Acupuncture showed a reduction in the dose of rescue medication (MD -5.52, 95% CI -7.45 to -3.58). Acupressure showed a decrease in frequency of nausea (MD -0.32, 95% CI -0.59 to 0.06) but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. All trials used state-of the-art combination antiemetics, except for the early electroacupuncture trials. Authors’ conclusions: Acupuncture has demonstrated some benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting by reducing the frequency of vomiting and reducing the use of rescue medication, while acupressure has shown a decrease in the frequency of nausea. Further trials of acupuncture and acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with refractory symptoms are needed before recommendations for clinical practice can be made. Future trials must be sufficiently powered, as this remains a major flaw with the majority of studies to date.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Chemotherapy Side Effects
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 842  
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Author Levett, K.M.; Smith, C.A.; Dahlen, H.G.; Bensoussan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth: a critical narrative review of current systematic review evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 523-540  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Analgesia; Labor Pain -- Therapy; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Embase; Female; Human; Medline; Pregnancy; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; PubMed; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Reviews of maternity services highlight the need for a reduction of medical interventions for women with low risk pregnancies and births to prevent the potential cascade of interventions and their associated risks. Complementary medicines (CM) such as acupuncture and acupressure have claimed to be effective in reducing interventions in labour; however, systematic reviews of evidence to date are conflicting. AIMS: To examine current evidence from systematic reviews on the topic of acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour and birth, and to evaluate the methodological and treatment frameworks applied to this evidence. METHODS: A search limited to systematic reviews of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane databases was performed in December 2013 using the keywords 'CAM', 'alternative medicine', 'complementary medicine', 'complementary therapies', 'traditional medicine', 'Chinese Medicine', 'Traditional Chinese Medicine', 'acupuncture', 'acupressure', cross-referenced with 'childbirth', 'birth', labo*r', and 'delivery'. The quality of the evidence is also evaluated in the context of study design. RESULTS: The RCTs included in these systematic reviews differed in terms of study designs, research questions, treatment protocols and outcome measures, and yielded some conflicting results. It may be inappropriate to include these together in a systematic review, or pooled analysis, of acupuncture for labour with an expectation of an overall conclusion for efficacy. Trials of acupuncture and acupressure in labour show promise, but further studies are required. CONCLUSION: The use of current systematic reviews of the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure for labour and birth may be misleading. Appropriate methods and outcome measures for investigation of acupuncture and acupressure treatment should more carefully reflect the research question being asked. The use of pragmatic trials designs with woman-centred outcomes may be appropriate for evaluating the effectiveness of these therapies.  
  Address National Institute for Complementary Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: A.Bensoussan@uws.edu.au.  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 103834125. Language: English. Entry Date: 20150501. Revision Date: 20150710. Publication Type: Journal Article; research; systematic review. Journal Subset: Alternative/Complementary Therapies; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. NLM UID: 9308777. Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ 103834125 Serial 2353  
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Author Smith, C.; Collins, C. T.; Crowther, C. openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Acupressure for Pain Management in Labour: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Abbreviated Journal Aust J Acupunct Chin Med  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 25-32  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Pain; Systematic Review; Women's Health; Pregnancy Complications; Labor Pain  
  Abstract Introduction: Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. The aim of the review is to examine the effects of acupuncture and acupressure for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity. Methods: Design: Systematic review of published and unpublished randomised, controlled trials. Subjects: Women, whether primiparous or multiparous, and in spontaneous or induced labour, in the first and second stage of labour. Interventions: Acupuncture and acupuncture compared to placebo, no treatment or pharmacological forms of pain management in labour. Outcomes measured: Maternal satisfaction, use of pharmacological pain relief and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Results: Five trials were included in the review. Three trials involved acupuncture (n = 496 women) and two trials acupressure (n = 172 women). Women receiving acupressure reported less anxiety compared with women in the control group (WMD -1.40, 95% CI -2.51 to 0.29). A difference in labour pain was found in one acupressure trial in the active labour phase (WMD -2.12, 95% CI -3.65 to -0.59). The trials of acupuncture showed a decreased need for pain relief (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.00). There was a benefit from acupuncture with a reduced need for augmentation in one trial (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.69). Conclusions: Acupuncture may be beneficial for the management of pain during labour; however, the number of women studied has been small.  
  Address  
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  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Labor Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1071  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Melchart, D.; Ihbe-Heffinger, A.; Leps, B.; von, Schilling C.; Linde, K. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and acupressure for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea-a randomised cross-over pilot study Type of Study RCT
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 14 Issue 8 Pages 878-882  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Cancer; Chemotherapy; Emesis; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Penetrating Sham; Nausea; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Neoplasms; Pilot Study; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Control; TCM Acupuncture Style; Vomiting  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a combination of acupuncture and acupressure is effective for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a randomised cross-over trial, 28 patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy and conventional standard antiemesis were treated for one chemotherapy cycle with a combination of acupuncture and acupressure at point P6 and for one cycle at a close sham point. The main outcome measure was a nausea score derived from daily intensity rating. RESULTS: There was no difference between combined acupuncture and acupressure treatment at P6 and at the sham point for the nausea score, but the level of nausea was very low in both phases. The mean nausea score was 6.2 (standard deviation 9.0) for treatment at P6 and 6.3 (9.1) for treatment at the sham point (mean difference -0.1, 95% confidence interval -3.9 to 3.7; p=0.96). Seventeen of 21 participants completing the study would desire acupuncture and acupressure for future chemotherapy cycles, but there was no clear preference for either point. CONCLUSION: In this small pilot study a significant difference between treatment at P6 and a close sham point could not be detected. However, it cannot be ruled out that an existing difference was missed due to the small sample size  
  Address Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, Department of Internal Medicine II, Technische Universitat Munchen, Kaiserstr. 9, 80801, Munchen, Germany, Klaus.Linde@lrz.tu-muenchen.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 28  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Vomiting
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score 81  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 850  
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Author Schlaeger, J.M.; Gabzdyl, E.M.; Bussell, J.L.; Takakura, N.; Yajima, H.; Takayama, M.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Acupressure in Labor Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 62 Issue 1 Pages 12-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Delivery, Obstetric; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture and acupressure, 2 modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine, are based on reducing pain and symptoms of disease through balancing yin and yang. Acupuncture and acupressure have been used in China for reduction of labor pain, labor augmentation, and other intrapartum indications for more than 2 millennia. This article presents a review of the current literature that has addressed the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on intrapartum events. Studies of acupuncture have demonstrated that acupuncture may reduce labor pain, the use of pharmacologic agents, the use of forceps and vacuum-assisted births, and the length of labor. Studies that examined the effect of acupuncture on labor that is induced or augmented for premature rupture of membranes have found that acupuncture may increase the degree of cervical ripening but does not reduce the amount of oxytocin or epidural analgesia administration, nor does it shorten length of induced labor. Acupressure may reduce labor pain and labor duration, but acupressure has not been found to increase cervical ripening or induce labor. There are insufficient studies about acupuncture and acupressure and their effects on labor at this time, and there is need for further research. Areas of uncertainty include efficacy, optimal point selection, best techniques, and length of time for point stimulation.  
  Address Judith M. Schlaeger, CNM, PhD, LAc, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing (M/C 802), Room 856, 845 S. Damen Ave. Chicago, IL 60612  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Delivery, Obstetric
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28002621 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2211  
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Author Shlay, J. C.; Chaloner, K.; Max, M. B.; Flaws, B.; Reichelderfer, P.; Wentworth, D.; Hillman, S.; Brizz, B.; Cohn, D. L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and amitriptyline for pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal JAMA  
  Volume 280 Issue 18 Pages 1590-1595  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; HIV Infections; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Penetrating Sham; Pain; Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Neuropathy; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Standard Needling Depth; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; Symptom Based Point Selection; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Peripheral neuropathy is common in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) but few data on symptomatic treatment are available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a standardized acupuncture regimen (SAR) and amitriptyline hydrochloride for the relief of pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected patients. DESIGN: Randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Each site enrolled patients into 1 of the following 3 options: (1) a modified double-blind 2 x 2 factorial design of SAR, amitriptyline, or the combination compared with placebo, (2) a modified double-blind design of an SAR vs control points, or (3) a double-blind design of amitriptyline vs placebo. SETTING: Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS (HIV primary care providers) in 10 US cities. PATIENTS: Patients with HIV-associated, symptomatic, lower-extremity peripheral neuropathy. Of 250 patients enrolled, 239 were in the acupuncture comparison (125 in the factorial option and 114 in the SAR option vs control points option), and 136 patients were in the amitriptyline comparison (125 in the factorial option and 11 in amitriptyline option vs placebo option). INTERVENTIONS: Standardized acupuncture regimen vs control points, amitriptyline (75 mg/d) vs placebo, or both for 14 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Changes in mean pain scores at 6 and 14 weeks, using a pain scale ranging from 0.0 (no pain) to 1.75 (extremely intense), recorded daily. RESULTS: Patients in all 4 groups showed reduction in mean pain scores at 6 and 14 weeks compared with baseline values. For both the acupuncture and amitriptyline comparisons, changes in pain score were not significantly different between the 2 groups. At 6 weeks, the estimated difference in pain reduction for patients in the SAR group compared with those in the control points group (a negative value indicates a greater reduction for the “active” treatment) was 0.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.11 to 0.12; P=.88) and for patients in the amitriptyline group vs those in the placebo group was -0.07 (95% CI, -0.22 to 0.08; P=.38). At 14 weeks, the difference for those in the SAR group compared with those in the control points group was -0.08 (95% CI, -0.21 to 0.06; P=.26) and for amitriptyline compared with placebo was 0.00 (95% CI, -0.18 to 0.19; P=.99). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, neither acupuncture nor amitriptyline was more effective than placebo in relieving pain caused by HIV-related peripheral neuropathy  
  Address Denver Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS, Colo, USA. jshlay@dhha.org  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 20  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 250  
  Time in Treatment 14 Weeks Condition Peripheral Neuropathy
  Disease Category HIV Infections OCSI Score 87  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1052  
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Author Gilbertson, B.; Wenner, K.; Russell, L. C. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and arthroscopic acromioplasty Type of Study RCT
  Year 2003 Publication Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Res  
  Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 752-758  
  Keywords Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Arthroscopic Acromioplasty; Arthroscopy; Auricular Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Penetrating Sham; Pain; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Sham Acupoint Control; Sham Control; Sham Electroacupuncture; Standard Needling Depth; Symptom Based Point Selection; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Shoulder Pain  
  Abstract Background. Acupuncture alleviates acute and chronic shoulder pain. Yet it has not been determined whether acupuncture is useful following musculoskeletal surgery. Hypothesis: Compared to sham acupuncture, arthroscopic acromioplasty subjects who received real acupuncture would manifest significantly better recovery as demonstrated by: UCLA shoulder scale, improved range of motion, diminished pain, decreased need and duration of analgesic use, and enhanced patient satisfaction.Methods. Forty arthroscopic acromioplasty patients were randomized to real or sham acupuncture. UCLA shoulder scale scores, pain intensity, analgesic use, range of motion, and quality of life were monitored for four months. Data were analyzed with the general linear model ANOVA for repeated measures.Results. Thirty-five subjects completed the study. Real acupuncture subjects scored significantly better on UCLA shoulder scale (p<0.000); pain intensity (p<0.022); self-reported analgesic use (p<0.008); angles of abduction (p<0.046); and in six of eight health status questionnaire components.Conclusions. Following arthroscopic acromioplasty, real acupuncture compared to sham acupuncture offered significantly greater improvement via: (1) lower pain level, (2) less analgesic use, (3) range of motion, and (4) patient satisfaction  
  Address Klamath Pain Clinic, 2301 Mountain View Boulevard, 97601, Klamath Falls, OR, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score 66  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 380  
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Author Cheong, Y. C.; Hung Yu, Ng E.; Ledger, W. L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and assisted conception Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication The Cochrane database of systematic reviews [electronic resource] Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume Issue 4 Pages CD006920-  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Assisted Reproductive Techniques; Embryo Transfer; Infertility, Female; IVF; Oocyte Retrieval; Systematic Review; Women's Health; In Vitro Fertilization  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has recently been studied in assisted reproductive treatment (ART) although its role in reproductive medicine is still debated. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in the outcomes of ART. SEARCH STRATEGY: All reports which describe randomised controlled trials of acupuncture in assisted conception were obtained through searches of the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE (1996 to August 2007), EMBASE (1980 to August 2007), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature) (1982 to August 2007), AMED, National Research Register, Clinical Trials register (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the Chinese database of clinical trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of acupuncture for couples who were undergoing ART comparing acupuncture treatment alone or acupuncture with concurrent ART versus no treatment, placebo or sham acupuncture plus ART for the treatment of primary and secondary infertility. Women with medical illness deemed contraindications for ART or acupuncture were excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Sixteen randomised controlled trials were identified that involved acupuncture and assisted conception. Thirteen trials were included in the review and three were excluded. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two review authors. Meta-analysis was performed using odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous outcomes. The outcome measures were live birth rate, clinical ongoing pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, and any reported side effects of treatment. MAIN RESULTS: There is evidence of benefit when acupuncture is performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) on the live birth rate (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.77) but not when it is performed two to three days after ET (OR 1.79, 95% CI 0.93 to 3.44). There is no evidence of benefit on pregnancy outcomes when acupuncture is performed around the time of oocyte retrieval. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture performed on the day of ET shows a beneficial effect on the live birth rate; however, with the present evidence this could be attributed to placebo effect and the small number of women included in the trials. Acupuncture should not be offered during the luteal phase in routine clinical practice until further evidence is available from sufficiently powered RCTs  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Southampton, Level F, Princess Anne Hospital, Coxford Road, Southampton, UK, SO16 5YA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Assisted Reproduction Therapy
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 159  
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Author Cheong, Y. C.; Dix, S.; Hung Yu, N. g E.; Ledger, W. L.; Farquhar, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture and assisted reproductive technology Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Systematic Review; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; Infertility, Female; Infertility, Male; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is commonly undertaken during an assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycle although its role in improving live birth and pregnancy rates is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture as an adjunct to ART cycles for male and female subfertility. SEARCH METHODS: All reports which described randomised controlled trials of acupuncture in assisted conception were obtained through searches of the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature), AMED , www.clinicaltrials.gov (all from inception to July 2013), National Research Register, and the Chinese clinical trial database (all to November 2012). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials of acupuncture for couples who were undergoing ART, comparing acupuncture treatment alone or acupuncture with concurrent ART versus no treatment, placebo or sham acupuncture plus ART for the treatment of primary and secondary infertility. Women with medical illness that was deemed to contraindicate ART or acupuncture were excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Twenty randomised controlled trials were included in the review and nine were excluded. Study selection, quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two review authors. Meta-analysis was performed using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The outcome measures were live birth rate, clinical ongoing pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, and any reported side effects of treatment. The quality of the evidence for the primary outcome (live birth) was rated using GRADE methods. MAIN RESULTS: This updated meta-analysis showed no evidence of overall benefit of acupuncture for improving live birth rate (LBR) regardless of whether acupuncture was performed around the time of oocyte retrieval (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.29, 2 studies, n = 464, I(2) = 0%, low quality evidence) or around the day of embryo transfer (ET) (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.70, 8 studies, n = 2505, I(2) = 69%, low quality evidence). There was no evidence that acupuncture had any effect on pregnancy or miscarriage rates, or had significant side effects. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence that acupuncture improves live birth or pregnancy rates in assisted conception.  
  Address Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Southampton, Level F, Princess Anne Hospital, Coxford Road, Southampton, UK, SO16 5YA.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Serial 158  
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Author Kleijnen, J.; ter Riet, G.; Knipschild, P. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and asthma: a review of controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 1991 Publication Thorax Abbreviated Journal Thorax  
  Volume 46 Issue 11 Pages 799-802  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Asthma; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Published controlled trials of acupuncture in asthma have often contained a small number of subjects and the results are contradictory. Controlled trials have been reviewed to determine whether clearer conclusions could be obtained by assessing as many studies as possible according to methodological criteria. METHODS: A literature search produced 13 trials on the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of patients with asthma. These studies were reviewed on the basis of 18 predefined methodological criteria. A maximum of 100 points for study design could be earned in three main categories: (a) adequate study population, (b) adequate intervention, and (c) adequate measurement of effects. RESULTS: The quality of even the eight better studies (more than 50% of the maximum score) proved to be mediocre. No study earned more than 72% of the maximum score. The results from the better studies are highly contradictory. CONCLUSIONS: Claims that acupuncture is effective in the treatment of asthma are not based on the results of well performed clinical trials  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 591  
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Author Zhou, J.; Qu, F.; Sang, X.; Wang, X.; Nan, R. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture and Auricular Acupressure in Relieving Menopausal Hot Flashes of Bilaterally Ovariectomized Chinese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords CAM Control; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Auricular Acupressure; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Hot Flashes; Menopause; RCT; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; TCM Acupuncture Style; Women's Health; Climacteric  
  Abstract The objective of this study is to explore the effects of acupuncture and auricular acupressure in relieving menopausal hot flashes of bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women. Between May 2006 and March 2008, 46 bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women were randomized into an acupuncture and auricular acupressure group (n = 21) and a hormone replacement therapy (HRT) group (Tibolone, n = 25). Each patient was given a standard daily log and was required to record the frequency and severity of hot flashes and side effects of the treatment felt daily, from 1 week before the treatment started to the fourth week after the treatment ended. The serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), LH and E(2) were detected before and after the treatment. After the treatment and the follow-up, both the severity and frequency of hot flashes in the two groups were relieved significantly when compared with pre-treatment (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the severity of hot flashes between them after treatment (P > 0.05), while after the follow-up, the severity of hot flashes in the HRT group was alleviated more. After the treatment and the follow-up, the frequency of menopausal hot flashes in the HRT group was reduced more (P < 0.05). After treatment, the levels of FSH decreased significantly and the levels of E(2) increased significantly in both groups (P < 0.05), and they changed more in the HRT group (P < 0.05). Acupuncture and auricular acupressure can be used as alternative treatments to relieve menopausal hot flashes for those bilaterally ovariectomized women who are unable or unwilling to receive HRT  
  Address No. 604 Room in B Building, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 388 Yuhang Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, P. R. China. qufan43@yahoo.com.cn  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 24  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 46  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Hot Flashes
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1480  
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