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Author Andersen, B. B.; Knudsen, B.; Lyndrup, J.; Faelling, A. E.; Illum, D.; Johansen, M.; Borgen, A.; Jager, H.; Bjerre, C.; Secher, N. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and/or sweeping of the fetal membranes before induction of labor: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial Type of Study (up)
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of perinatal medicine Abbreviated Journal J Perinat Med  
  Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 555-560  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Obstetric Surgical Procedures; Labor, Induced; Women's Health; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sweeping Fetal Membranes; Sweeping; Attention Control; Usual Care Control, Physical; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style  
  Abstract Abstract Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture, and sweeping of the fetal membranes, as methods for induction of labor. Methods: Four hundred and seven pregnant women with normal singleton pregnancies and cephalic presentations were randomized at three delivery wards in Denmark at day 290 of gestation into groups of acupuncture, sweeping, acupuncture and sweeping and controls. The primary objective was to compare the proportion of women going into labor before induction of labor at 294 days in the four groups. The secondary objective was to compare the combined groups: with and without acupuncture, and with and without sweeping of the fetal membranes. The midwives, completing the forms for the trial at labor or induction, were blinded to group assessments. Results: Four hundred and seventeen women were randomized. Ten were excluded after randomization. One hundred and four women were randomized to acupuncture, 103 to sweeping of the membranes, 100 to both acupuncture and sweeping, and 100 were randomized to the control group. Comparison of the four groups demonstrated no significant difference in the number of women achieving spontaneous labor before planned induction. No difference was demonstrated by comparing the combined groups treated with acupuncture with the groups not treated with acupuncture (P=0.76). However, significantly more women went into labor before planned induction (P=0.02) in the combined groups receiving sweeping, compared with the groups not treated with sweeping. Conclusions: Acupuncture at 41+ weeks of gestation did not reduce the need for induction. The study was of a sufficient size to demonstrate, in parallel, that sweeping of the fetal membranes significantly reduced the need of induction, sparing about 15% for formal induction of labor.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 407  
  Time in Treatment 1 Week Condition Labor, Induced
  Disease Category Obstetric Surgical Procedures OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 28  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reinhold, T.; Brinkhaus, B.; Willich, S. N.; Witt, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture in Patients Suffering from Allergic Asthma: Is It Worth Additional Costs? Type of Study (up)
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 169-177  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Asthma; Acu Versus Wait List; Acupuncture; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Wait List Control; Cost Effectiveness  
  Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture is increasingly used in patients with allergic asthma, but there is a lack of evidence on the cost-benefit relationship of this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess economic aspects of additional acupuncture treatment in patients with allergic bronchial asthma compared to patients receiving routine care alone. Design, subjects, intervention, outcome measures: In a randomized controlled trial, patients with allergic bronchial asthma were either allocated to a group receiving acupuncture immediately or a waiting-list control group. Both groups were free to use routine care treatment. The resource consumption, costs, and health-related quality of life were evaluated at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months by using statutory health insurance information and standardized questionnaires. Main economic outcome parameters were direct and indirect cost differences during the study period and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of acupuncture treatment. Results: Three hundred and six (306) patients (159 acupuncture; 147 controls) were included (mean age 46.5+/-13.11 years, female 57.2%) and were comparable at baseline. Acupuncture treatment was associated with significantly higher costs compared to control patients (overall costs: euro860.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) 705.04-1016.47] versus euro518.80 [95% CI 356.66-680.93]; p=0.003; asthma-related costs: euro517.52 [95% CI 485.63-549.40] versus euro144.87 [95% CI 111.70-178.05]; p<0.001). These additional costs seem essentially driven by acupuncture costs themselves (euro378.40 [95% CI 367.10-389.69]). However, acupuncture was associated with superior effectiveness in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Resulting ICER lay between euro23,231 (overall) and euro25,315 (diagnosis-specific) per additional QALY. When using German acupuncture prices of year 2012, the ICER would improve to euro12.810 (overall) versus euro14,911 (diagnosis-specific) per QALY gained. Conclusions: Treating patients who have allergic bronchial asthma with acupuncture in addition to routine care resulted in additional costs and better effects in terms of patients' quality of life. Acupuncture therefore seems to be a useful and cost-effective add-on treatment.  
  Address Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite-University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany .  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 357  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Asthma
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 981  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fassoulaki, A.; Paraskeva, A.; Patris, K.; Pourgiezi, T.; Kostopanagiotou, G. openurl 
  Title Pressure applied on the extra 1 acupuncture point reduces bispectral index values and stress in volunteers Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Anesth Analg Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages 885-90, table of content  
  Keywords Healthy Subjects; Rct; Cross-Over Design; Stress, Psychological; Acu Versus Sham; Acupressure; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract We investigated the effect of pressure application on the acupuncture point “extra 1” and on a control point on the bispectral index (BIS) values and on stress in 25 volunteers. In each volunteer, pressure was applied on the extra 1 point for 10 min and on a control point for 5 min on different days and in a randomized manner. The BIS value was recorded before applying pressure on the extra 1 point, during pressure application every 30 s for 10 min, and after pressure release. Regarding the control point, BIS values were recorded for 5 instead of 10 min during pressure application because acupressure on that point was associated with an unpleasant feeling. Each volunteer was asked to score stress before and after pressure application from 0 to 10. The BIS values were significantly reduced 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 min during pressure application on the extra 1 point (P < 0.001 for each comparison, respectively) and returned to the baseline values after pressure release. Pressure application on the control point decreased BIS values (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 at 2.5 and 5 min, respectively). However, these values were maintained close to 90% and were significantly higher than those obtained during pressure on the extra 1 point (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 for the 2.5- and 5-min comparisons). The verbal sedation score values obtained after pressure application on the extra 1 point were also lower when compared with the values obtained after pressure application on the control point (P < 0.001). IMPLICATIONS: This crossover study investigated the effect of pressure application on the acupuncture “extra 1” point in healthy volunteers. Acupressure applied for 10 min on the extra 1 point significantly reduced the BIS values and the verbal stress score when compared with acupressure applied on a control point.  
  Address Department of Anesthesiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Athens, Greece. afassoul@otenet.gr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 25  
  Time in Treatment 2 Days Condition Stress, Psychological
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 9/22/2015; Date Modified: 9/22/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Stress, Psychological; Department of Anesthesiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Athens, Greece. afassoul@otenet.gr; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12598279 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1499  
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Author Bennell, K.L.; Buchbinder, R.; Hinman, R.S. openurl 
  Title Physical therapies in the management of osteoarthritis: current state of the evidence Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Curr Opin Rheumatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 304-311  
  Keywords  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review considers the role of physical therapies in osteoarthritis management, highlighting key findings from systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published in the last 2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: Three new trials question the role of manual therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis. No between-group differences in outcome were detected between a multimodal programme including manual therapy and home exercise, and placebo in one trial; a second trial found no benefit of adding manual therapy to an exercise programme, while a third trial reported marginal benefits over usual care that were of doubtful importance. Recent trials have also found no or uncertain clinical benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or acupuncture, or of valgus braces or lateral wedge insoles for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis. Available evidence suggests a small to moderate effect of exercise in comparison with not exercising for hip or knee osteoarthritis, although optimum exercise prescription and dosage are unclear. One trial also observed a delay in joint replacement in people with hip osteoarthritis. Two trials have reported conflicting findings about the effects of exercise for hand osteoarthritis. SUMMARY: Other than exercise, recent data suggest that the role of physical therapies in the treatment of osteoarthritis appears limited.  
  Address aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; aCentre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne bDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University cMonash Department of C; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25775185 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1506  
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Author Ma, D.; Han, J.S.; Diao, Q.H.; Deng, G.F.; Ping, X.J.; Jin, W.J.; Wu, L.Z.; Cui, C.L.; Li, X.D. doi  openurl
  Title Transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation for the treatment of withdrawal syndrome in heroin addicts Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pain Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 839-48 LID - 10.1111/pme  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Substance-Related Disorders; Heroin Dependence; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation; TENS; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the therapeutic effect of transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) for the treatment of withdrawal syndrome in heroin addicts. METHODS: A total of 63 male heroin addicts with withdrawal score higher than 20 were recruited in the Detoxification Center of Zhongshan city, Guangdong province, China. They were randomly distributed into two groups: TEAS group (n = 31) received TEAS by using a Han's acupoint nerve stimulator (HANS) model 200A with two output channels, 2-3 sessions per day, 30 minutes per session for 10 consecutive days. Electrical stimulation of alternating frequencies of 2- and 100-Hz with 3 second each, and with intensity of 10-15 mA was applied on Hegu (LI-4) and Laogong (PC-8) points on one hand, and Neiguan (PC-6) and Waiguan (SJ-5) points on the other forearm via electroconductive skin pads of 4 cm x 4 cm in size. The control group (n = 32) was treated with similar procedure except that the leads of the output of the stimulator was disconnected. Assessments of the severity of the withdrawal syndrome were conducted one day before and on each day during the whole treatment period of 10 days. Buprenorphin of 1 mg per day sublingually was provided to all subjects in the first two days, and then to those with withdrawal score over 20 in the following days. RESULTS: The TEAS treatment dramatically alleviated the withdrawal syndrome during heroin detoxification. No significant difference was found in withdrawal scores between the two groups at the beginning of the observation. Withdrawal scores showed a more marked drop in TEAS group than the control starting from the second day, and maintained at a lower level for the whole course of treatment. The area under the curve of withdrawal score in TEAS group was only 40% of that in the control (P < 0.001, two way repeated measures analysis of variance), and the requirement of buprenorphine was only 10% of that in the control. No adverse effects were observed in either group. CONCLUSION: TEAS of 2/100 Hz for 10 days in abrupt abstinence of the heroin addicts resulted in a marked reduction of the withdrawal syndrome as well as a reduced requirement for rescue opioids.  
  Address Neuroscience Research Institute &amp; Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100191.; Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education/National Health and Family Planning Commission, Peking Uni  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 25  
  Treatment Follow-up 1.5 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 63  
  Time in Treatment 1.5 Weeks Condition Heroin Dependence
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; Neuroscience Research Institute & Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100191.; Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education/National Health and Family Planning Commission, Peking Uni; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=25989154 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1508  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, H.; Shang, X.J.; Dong, Q.R. openurl 
  Title Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on rats with the third lumbar vertebrae transverse process syndrome. Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) at local or distant acupuncture points in a rat model of the third lumbar vertebrae transverse process syndrome. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, model, model plus local acupuncture point stimulation at BL23 (model+LAS) and model plus distant acupuncture point stimulation at ST36 (model+DAS) groups. All rats except controls underwent surgical third lumbar vertebrae transverse process syndrome modelling on day 2. Thereafter, rats in the model+LAS and model+DAS groups were treated daily with TENS for a total of six treatments (2/100 Hz, 30 min/day) from day 16 to day 29. Thermal pain thresholds were measured once a week during treatment and were continued until day 57, when local muscle tissue was sampled for RT-PCR and histopathological examination after haematoxylin and eosin staining. mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was determined. RESULTS: Thermal pain thresholds of all model rats decreased relative to the control group. Both LAS and DAS significantly increased the thermal pain threshold at all but one point during the treatment period. Histopathological assessment revealed that the local muscle tissues around the third lumbar vertebrae transverse process recovered to some degree in both the model+LAS and model+DAS groups; however, LAS appeared to have a greater effect. mRNA expression of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and iNOS in the local muscle tissues was increased after modelling and attenuated in both model+LAS and model+DAS groups. The beneficial effect was greater after LAS than after DAS. CONCLUSIONS: TENS at both local (BL23) and distant (ST36) acupuncture points had a pain-relieving effect in rats with the third lumbar vertebrae transverse process syndrome, and LAS appeared to have greater anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects than DAS. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: 09073.  
  Address  
  Publisher Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/gro
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Suzhou, China Department of Orthopaedics, The First People's Hospital of Changzhou and the Third Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Changzhou, China.; Department; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26104377 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1510  
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Author Sastry, P.; Hardman, G.; Page, A.; Parker, R.; Goddard, M.; Large, S.; Jenkins, D.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mesenteric ischaemia following cardiac surgery: the influence of intraoperative perfusion parameters Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 419-24 LID - 10.1093/icv  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiac Surgical Procedures/*adverse effects/mortality; Cause of Death; England; Female; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Male; Mesenteric Ischemia/diagnosis/*etiology/mortality; Odds Ratio; *Perfusion/adverse effects; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome; Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use; Oto – Notnlm; OT – Cardiac surgery; OT – Intestinal ischaemia; OT – Mesenteric ischaemia  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Mesenteric ischaemia (MesI) remains a rare but lethal complication following cardiac surgery. Previously identified risk factors for MesI mortality (age, poor left ventricular (LV) function, cardiopulmonary bypass time and blood loss) are non-specific and cannot necessarily be modified. This study aims to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for MesI mortality through analysis of peri- and intraoperative perfusion data. METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2011 at Papworth Hospital were retrospectively divided into 3 outcome categories: death caused by MesI; death due to other causes and survival to discharge. A published MesI risk calculator was used to estimate risk of MesI for each patient and then to create 3 cohorts of matched patients from each outcome group. Pre-, intra- and postoperative variables were collected and conditional logistic regression methods were used to identify parameters associated specifically with MesI deaths after cardiac surgery. RESULTS: A total of 10 409 patients underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2011. The incidence of MesI was 0.3% (30 patients). Two hundred and sixty-one patients died of non-MesI causes and 10 118 survived. It was possible to identify 25 patients in each group at equivalent risk of MesI. The following parameters were found to be associated with MesI mortality: recent myocardial infarction [odds ratio (OR) 4.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.58-15.71, P = 0.01], standard EuroSCORE (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.21, P = 0.01), vasopressor dose on bypass (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.57, P = 0.02), metaraminol dose on bypass (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12-2.06, P = 0.01) and lowest documented mean arterial pressure (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97, P = 0.01). No other intraoperative perfusion-related parameters (e.g. flow, average activated clotting time or pressure) were associated with MesI mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Our study not only confirms previously known predictive factors, but also demonstrates a new association between intraoperative vasopressor use and MesI mortality.  
  Address  
  Publisher (c) The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 19 Condition 3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/27/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK.; Department of Public Health and; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24939960 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1513  
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Author Yin, H.; Wang, S. openurl 
  Title Effect of Acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) and Zhaohai (KI 6) on Polysomnography of Primary Insomnia Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int J Clin Acupunct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 114-116  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; No Treatment Control  
  Abstract Objective: To observe the effect of acupuncture at Shenmai (13L 62) and Zhaohai (K1 6) on polysomnography (PSG) in primary insomnia. Methods: 120 patients were randomly divided into 3 groups, with group A receiving acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) with reducing method, group B receiving acupuncture at Zhaohai (KI 6) with enhancing method, and group C receiving acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) and Zhaohai (KI 6) with reducing and enhancing method, respectively. Forty healthy volunteers were enrolled as the control group. PSG examination was given to patients in both groups before and after treatment. Self-controlled study was conducted in the treatment group, and the change of indicators in the three treatment groups and between all four groups were compared and observed. Results: Significant difference was observed in indicators before and after treatment in both group A and B (P < 0.05), but influence on sleep cycle and sleep structure was different. All indicators before and after treatment in group C showed significant difference (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Comparing with group A, B and C, a significant difference was observed in the indicators (P< 0.05 or P‹ 0.01) after treatment compared with control group. Group C showed no significant difference (P> 0.05) compared with control group after treatment. Conclusion: the acupuncture combination of Zhaohai (KI 6) and Shenmai (BL 62) could obviously improve the sleep quality.  
  Address Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong, China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 160  
  Time in Treatment 7 Weeks Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1814  
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Author Goddard, G.; Albers, D.; Guachalla, J. openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Effect On Painful Electrical Stimulation Of The Dental Pulp Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Medical Acupuncture Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 26-30  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Rct; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract Background: Acupuncture was evaluated by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1997 and deemed an effective complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of myofascial pain, chronic pain, vomiting, nausea, and analgesia. Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for pain reduction in headaches, postoperative dental pain, and myofascial pain. Objective: To test the hypothesis that acupuncture would decrease the pain from electrical stimulation of the front teeth. Design, Setting, and Patients: At Universidad Mayor, Santiago, Chile, 40 volunteers (21 men and 19 women) were recruited to participate in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or real acupuncture. Intervention: The real group received acupuncture at LI 4 and the placebo group also received placebo acupuncture at L14, both for 15 minutes. Both groups had an electric pain stimulation applied to the 4 upper front teeth, before and after acupuncture or placebo acupuncture was performed. Results: To analyze the results, a t test was used, comparing placebo vs real acupuncture on each front tooth, and also to compare left incisors with right incisors. No significant differences in pain reduction were found between the volunteers who received real acupuncture and those who received the placebo, or between left and right incisors. Conclusion: Acupuncture performed at LI 4 had no effect on the electric pain stimulation of the 4 upper front teeth.  
  Address University of California at San Francisco, Center for Orofacial Pain, 707 Parnassus Ave, Rm D- 1050, San Francisco, CA 94143. greg.goddard@ucsf.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 40  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 9/29/2015; Date Modified: 9/29/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; University of California at San Francisco, Center for Orofacial Pain, 707 Parnassus Ave, Rm D- 1050, San Francisco, CA 94143. greg.goddard@ucsf.edu Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1815  
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Author Itoh, K.; Okada, K.; Kawakita, K. openurl 
  Title A proposed experimental model of myofascial trigger points in human muscle after slow eccentric exercise Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 2-12; discussion 12-3  
  Keywords Nrct; Healthy Subjects  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental model of myofascial trigger points to investigate their pathophysiology. METHODS: Fifteen healthy volunteers who gave informed consent underwent repetitive eccentric exercise of the third finger of one hand (0.1 Hz repetitions, three sets at five minute intervals) until exhaustion. Physical examination, pressure pain threshold, and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured immediately afterwards and for seven days. Needle electromyogram (EMG) was also recorded in a subgroup of participants. RESULTS: Pressure pain thresholds decreased to a minimum on the second day after the exercise, then gradually returned to baseline values by the seventh day. On the second day, a ropy band was palpated in the exercised forearm muscle and the electrical pain threshold of the fascia at the palpable band was the lowest among the measured loci and tissues. Needle EMG activity accompanied with dull pain sensation was recorded only when the electrode was located on or near the fascia of the palpable band on the second day of exercise. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that eccentric exercise may yield a useful model for the investigation of the myofascial trigger points and/or acupuncture points. The sensitised nociceptors at the fascia of the palpable band might be a possible candidate for the localised tender region.  
  Address Meiji University of Oriental Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 9/29/2015; Date Modified: 9/29/2015; Availability: --In File--; Priority: Normal; Meiji University of Oriental Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15077932 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1816  
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Author Schnyer, R.N.; Conboy, L.A.; Jacobson, E.; McKnight, P.; Goddard, T.; Moscatelli, F.; Legedza, A.T.; Kerr, C.; Kaptchuk, T.J.; Wayne, P.M. openurl 
  Title Development of a Chinese medicine assessment measure: an interdisciplinary approach using the delphi method Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication J Altern Complement Med Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 1005-1013  
  Keywords Data Interpretation, Statistical; *Delphi Technique; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Medicine, Chinese Traditional/*instrumentation/methods; Patient Care Team/organization &amp; administration; Physician's Practice Patterns; Program Development/methods; Psychometrics/*instrumentation; Reproducibility of Results  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The diagnostic framework and clinical reasoning process in Chinese medicine emphasizes the contextual and qualitative nature of a patient's illness. Chinese medicine assessment data may help interpret clinical outcomes. OBJECTIVES: As part of a study aimed at assessing the validity and improving the inter-rater reliability of the Chinese diagnostic process, a structured assessment instrument was developed for use in clinical trials of acupuncture and other Chinese medical therapies. STUDY DESIGN: To foster collaboration and maximize resources and information, an interdisciplinary advisory team was assembled. Under the guidance of two group process facilitators, and in order to establish whether the assessment instrument was consistent with accepted Chinese medicine diagnostic categories (face validity) and included the full range of each concept's meaning (content validity), a panel of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) expert clinicians was convened and their responses were organized using the Delphi process, an iterative, anonymous, idea-generating and consensus-building process. An aggregate rating measure was obtained by taking the mean of mean ratings for each question across all 10 experts. RESULTS: Over three rounds, the overall rating increased from 7.4 (SD = 1.3) in Round 1 to 9.1 (SD = 0.5) in Round 3. The level of agreement among clinicians was measured by a decrease in SD. CONCLUSIONS: The final instrument TEAMSI-TCM (Traditional East Asian Medicine Structured Interview, TCM version) uses the pattern differentiation model characteristic of TCM. This modular, dynamic version was specifically designed to assess women, with a focus on gynecologic conditions; with modifications it can be adapted for use with other populations and conditions. TEAMSI-TCM is a prescriptive instrument that guides clinicians to use the proper indicators, combine them in a systematic manner, and generate conclusions. In conjunction with treatment manualization and training it may serve to increase inter-rater reliability and inter-trial reproducibility in Chinese medicine clinical trials. Testing of the validity and reliability of this instrument currently is underway.  
  Address New England School of Acupuncture, Watertown, MA 02215, USA. Rosa_Schnyer@hms.harvard.edu  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 9/29/2015; Date Modified: 10/8/2015; Priority: Normal; New England School of Acupuncture, Watertown, MA 02215, USA. RosaSchnyer@hms.harvard.edu; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&listuids=16398591 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1817  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Da, N.; Wang, X.; Liu, H.; Xu, X.; Jin, X.; Chen, C.; Zhu, D.; Bai, J.; Zhang, X.; Zou, Y.; Hu, G.; Zhang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture for Functional Constipation: A Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2015 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Gastrointestinal Diseases; Constipation; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; Sham Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract Background. Electroacupuncture (EA) has been reported to treat functional constipation (FC). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of EA with different needle insertion method for FC. Methods. Sixty-seven participants were randomly assigned to control (EA with shallow puncture) and EA (with deep puncture) groups. Every patient received 5 treatments per week in the first two weeks, then 3 treatments per week during the following six weeks. Complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBM), spontaneous bowel movements (SBM), Bristol stool scores (BSS), and Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QOL) were assessed. Results. Both shallow and deep EA significantly increased CSBM frequency compared to the baseline. CSBM was increased from 0.50 ± 0.59/wk to 2.00 ± 1.67/wk with deep EA and from 0.48 ± 0.59/wk to 1.33 ± 1.09/wk with shallow EA (P < 0.05, resp.). Similar finding was noted in SBM. Deep EA was more potent than shallow EA (P < 0.05) during the treatment period. No difference was found on BSS and PAC-QOL between two groups. Conclusion. It is effective and safe with EA to treat FC. Studies with large sample size and long-term observation are needed for further investigation.  
  Address Second Clinic Medical School, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210000, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 28  
  Treatment Follow-up 20 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 67  
  Time in Treatment 8 Weeks Condition Constipation
  Disease Category Gastrointestinal Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1883  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, M.T.; Sheen, J.M.; Chuang, K.H.; Yang, P.; Chin, S.L.; Tsai, C.Y.; Chen, C.J.; Liao, J.R.; Lai, P.H.; Chu, K.A.; Pan, H.B.; Yang, C.F. openurl 
  Title Neuronal specificity of acupuncture response: a fMRI study with electroacupuncture Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Neuroimage Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 1028-1037  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Healthy Subjects  
  Abstract Recently, neuronal correlates of acupuncture stimulation in human brain have been investigated by functional neuroimaging. The preliminary findings suggest that acupuncture at analgesic points involves the pain-related neuromatrix and may have acupoint-brain correlation. Although multiple models of control stimulations have been applied to address the specificity of the needling effect clinically, their impacts have not been evaluated by functional neuroimaging. With the advantage of objective parameter setting, electroacupuncture (EA) was used in this study to devise three distinct controls for real EA, i.e., mock EA (no stimulation), minimal EA (superficial and light stimulation), and sham EA (same stimulation as real EA) applied at nonmeridian points. Fifteen healthy volunteers received real EA at analgesic point Gallbladder 34 (Yanglinquan), sham EA, and one of either mock EA or minimal EA over the left leg in counter-balanced orders. Multisubject analysis showed that sham EA and real EA both activated the reported distributed pain neuromatrix. However, real EA elicited significantly higher activation than sham EA over the hypothalamus and primary somatosensory-motor cortex and deactivation over the rostral segment of anterior cingulate cortex. In the comparison of minimal EA versus mock EA, minimal EA elicited significantly higher activation over the medial occipital cortex. Single-subject analysis showed that superior temporal gyrus (encompassing the auditory cortex) and medial occipital cortex (encompassing the visual cortex) frequently respond to minimal EA, sham EA, or real EA. We concluded that the hypothalamus-limbic system was significantly modulated by EA at acupoints rather than at nonmeridian points, while visual and auditory cortical activation was not a specific effect of treatment-relevant acupoints and required further investigation of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms.  
  Address Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan, Republic of China.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants 14  
  Time in Treatment Condition Healthy Subjects
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Date Modified: 10/8/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan, Republic of China.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12202090 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1826  
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Author Chapman, C.R.; Wilson, M.E.; Gehrig, J.D. openurl 
  Title Comparative effects of acupuncture and transcutaneous stimulation on the perception of painful dental stimuli Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 1976 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 265-283  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Healthy Subjects; Anesthesia and Analgesia; Pain; Rct; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Tens; Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; Unspecified Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Acupoint Control  
  Abstract The effects of acupunctural stimulation on the perception of induced dental pain were compared with those of placebo acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) at an acupuncture site. Each of 4 groups of 15 subjects received one of the following treatments: acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, TES, or control conditions. Every subject was tested twice, once in a baseline session and on another day in a test session. Four levels of painful dental stimuli were delivered repeatedly and in random order to each subject in each session, who rated the perceived intensity of each stimulus on a pain category scale. All three treatment groups showed a significant reduction in magnitude of stimulus ratings after treatment. A Sensory Decision Theory analysis of the data was employed to assess the sensory sensitivity of each subject to each of 4 levels of dental stimulation and the willingness of the subject to label the strongest stimulus as painful. Acupuncture and TES groups showed a small but significant sensory analgesic response to treatment and a significant reduction in willingness to identify the strongest stimulus as painful when contrasted to controls, but placebo acupuncture subjects failed to show significant change on either of the response measures. The effects of acupuncture were most pronounced at the lowest level of stimulation, while TES affected the perception of all levels of dental stimuli. The observed effects appeared to be small, reliable, and dependent on the stimulation of a particular anatomical locus.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 2  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 60  
  Time in Treatment 1 Day Condition Anesthesia and Analgesia
  Disease Category Healthy Subjects OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 8/6/2015; Date Modified: 8/20/2015; Priority: Normal; Anesthesia and Analgesia; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=800251 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1521  
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Author Marshall, J.; Wong, K.Y.; Rupasinghe, C.N.; Tiwari, R.; Zhao, X.; Berberoglu, E.D.; Sinkler, C.; Liu, J.; Lee, I.; Parang, K.; Spaller, M.R.; Huttemann, M.; Goebel, D.J. doi  openurl
  Title Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Neuronal Death by Polyarginine Peptides is Linked to the Attenuation of Stress-Induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential. LID – jbc.M115.662791 [pii] Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Biol Chem Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract It is widely accepted that over-activation of NMDA receptors resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ binding cyclic-peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced pro-survival signaling. Here we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA-toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell death and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long-term ganglion cell viability. Although neuro-protection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), linked to the PDZ-PSD-95 binding cyclic-peptide, was sufficient to mediate short- and long-term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons.  
  Address  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2015, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency The Journal of biological chemistry Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; Brown University, United States;; University of Michigan, United States;; Dartmouth, United States;; Chapman University, United States;; University of Michigan, United States;; Wayne State University, United States;; Wayne State University, United St; Eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=26100636 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1528  
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Author Li, X.; Wang, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Int Rev Neurobiol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 111 Issue Pages 159-79 Lid - 10.1016/B97  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Animals; Humans; Stroke/*therapy; Oto – Notnlm; OT – Acupuncture; OT – Ischemia; OT – Preconditioning; OT – Rehabilitation; OT – Stroke  
  Abstract Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence.  
  Address Postgraduate Department of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China ; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Medical School, West China Hospital Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Xiang, Wuhou District, Chengdu  
  Publisher (c) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Date Modified: 10/1/2015; Priority: Normal; Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=24215922 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1832  
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Author Jeon, J.-H.; Yoon, J.; Cho, C.-K.; Jung, I.-C.; Kim, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Yoo, H.-S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture for radioactive-iodine-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients: a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled pilot study Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 221-230  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Neoplasms; Anorexia Nervosa; RCT; Pilot Study; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; Korean Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; Thyroid Neoplasm; Thyroid Cancer; Radioactive Iodine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients. METHODS: Fourteen thyroid cancer patients with RAI-induced anorexia were randomized to a true acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both groups were given 6 true or sham acupuncture treatments in 2 weeks. Outcome measures included the change of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia and Cachexia Treatment (FAACT; Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale [ACS], Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G]), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), weight, body mass index (BMI), ACTH, and cortisol levels. RESULTS: The mean FAACT ACS scores of the true and sham acupuncture groups increased from baseline to exit in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses; the true acupuncture group showed higher increase but with no statistical significance. Between groups, from baseline to the last treatment, statistically significant differences were found in ITT analysis of the Table of Index (TOI) score (P = .034) and in PP analysis of the TOI (P = .016), FACT-G (P = .045), FAACT (P = .037) scores. There was no significant difference in VAS, weight, BMI, ACTH, and cortisol level changes between groups. CONCLUSION: Although the current study is based on a small sample of participants, our findings support the safety and potential use of acupuncture for RAI-induced anorexia and quality of life in thyroid cancer patients.  
  Address Daejeon Korean Medicine Hospital, Daejeon University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. altyhs@dju.kr  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 6  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 14  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Anorexia Nervosa
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:25691084 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1884  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. openurl 
  Title Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Environ Health Perspect Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 261-6 LID - 10.1289/ehp.  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; China/epidemiology; Coal/*adverse effects; Cohort Studies; Female; *Household Articles; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Pneumonia/chemically induced/*epidemiology/*mortality; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Pmc – Pmc2649229; Oid – Nlm: Pmc2649229; Oto – Notnlm; OT – coal; OT – cohort study; OT – indoor air pollution; OT – pneumonia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Environmental health perspectives Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 117 Condition 2
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240 , USA. shenmi@mail.nih.gov; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=19270797 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1553  
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Author Soliman, A.; O'Driscoll, G.A.; Pruessner, J.; Joober, R.; Ditto, B.; Streicker, E.; Goldberg, Y.; Caro, J.; Rekkas, P.V.; Dagher, A. openurl 
  Title Limbic response to psychosocial stress in schizotypy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Schizophr Res Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 184-91 LID - 10.1016/j.s  
  Keywords Adolescent; Brain Mapping; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/metabolism; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Limbic System/*blood supply; Linear Models; *Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Oxygen/blood; Personality Inventory; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Saliva; Schizotypal Personality Disorder/complications/*pathology; Stress, Psychological/complications/*pathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Psychological stress causes dopamine release in the striatum and is thought to play a role in susceptibility to psychotic illness. Previous work suggests that an elevated dopaminergic response to stress may index vulnerability to psychosis in certain individuals. With functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured stress-induced changes in brain activity in healthy individuals at elevated risk of developing psychosis. Participants were 15 controls and 25 psychometric schizotypes: 12 with positive symptom schizotypy (perceptual aberrations) and 13 with negative symptom schizotypy (physical anhedonia), as determined by questionnaires (Chapman et al., 1976; Chapman and Chapman, 1978). In the scanner, participants performed the Montreal Imaging Stress Task and a matched sensory-motor control task. Measures of self-reported stress and salivary cortisol levels were taken throughout the experiment. All three groups showed significant increases in self-reported stress and significant fMRI signal change in the striatal, limbic and cortical regions. However, the Physical Anhedonia group showed greater stress-induced striatal and limbic deactivation than the other two groups. Deactivation in the striatum was significantly correlated with Physical Anhedonia score across all subjects. Our findings suggest the presence of abnormalities in striatal response to stress in negative symptom schizotypy.  
  Address  
  Publisher Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Schizophrenia research Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment 131 Condition 1-3
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 7/29/2015; Priority: Normal; McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=21705195 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1556  
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Author Fallopa, P.; Escosteguy-Neto, J.C.; Varela, P.; Carvalho, T.N.; Tabosa, A.M.; Santos, J.G., Jr. openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture reverses ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and subsequent pERK expression in mice Type of Study (up) Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Int J Neuropsychopharmacol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 8 Pages 1121-33 Lid - 10.1017/S14  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Alcohol-Related Disorders/*therapy; Analysis of Variance; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Biophysics; Brain/drug effects/metabolism; Central Nervous System Depressants/*adverse effects; Disease Models, Animal; Electric Stimulation; Electroacupuncture/*methods; Ethanol/*adverse effects; Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/*metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects/physiology; Locomotion/*drug effects; Male; Mice  
  Abstract Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) plays a role in neuronal changes induced by repeated drug exposure. Given that electroacupuncture reverses locomotor sensitization induced by ethanol, we investigated whether this effect is parallel to ERK signalling. Mice received daily ethanol (2 g/kg i.p), for 21 d. Electroacupuncture was performed daily, during four (subsequent) days of ethanol withdrawal. The stimulus of 2 Hz or 100 Hz was provided in combinations of two acupoints: Ea1 (ST-36/Zusanli and PC-6/Neiguan) or Ea2 (Du-14/Dazhui and Du-20/Baihui). The specificity of acupoint effects were assessed by the inclusion of additional groups: Ea3 (ST-25/Tianshu--acupoint used for other non-related disorders), Sham1 or Sham2 (transdermic stimulation near the respective acupoints). The control group was only handled during withdrawal and the saline group was chronically treated with saline and handled similarly to controls. At day 5 of withdrawal, each group was divided in two subgroups, according to the presence or absence of ethanol challenge. The animals were perfused and their brains processed for pERK immunohistochemistry. Only Ea1 at 100 Hz (Ea1100) and Ea2 at 2 Hz (Ea22) reversed locomotor sensitization induced by ethanol. Ethanol withdrawal decreases pERK in the dorsomedial striatum. This decrease is not abolished by electroacupuncture. Conversely, ethanol challenge increases pERK in the dorsomedial striatum, infralimbic cortex and central nucleus of amygdala. The specificity of acupoint stimulation to reverse these increases was seen only for Ea22, in the infralimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum. Therefore, behavioural effects of Ea22 (but not Ea1_100) depend, at least in part, on ERK signalling.  
  Address Laboratory of Neurobiology, Group of Neuronal Plasticity and Psychiatric Disorders, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Date of Input: 6/25/2015; Date Modified: 9/24/2015; Priority: Normal; Laboratory of Neurobiology, Group of Neuronal Plasticity and Psychiatric Disorders, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.; eng; Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=21859515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 1829  
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