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Author Yeung, W. F.; Chung, K. F.; Leung, Y. K.; Zhang, S. P.; Law, A. C. url  openurl
  Title Traditional needle acupuncture treatment for insomnia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Insomnia; Nervous System Diseases; Acupuncture; Sleep Disorders; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Previous reviews regarding traditional needle acupuncture (TNA) treatment for insomnia were limited to English scientific literature. A comprehensive review including Chinese and English literature has therefore been conducted to examine the efficacy of TNA for insomnia. METHODS: We performed systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TNA as intervention for insomnia against placebo, Western medication, and non-treated controls. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by the modified Jadad score and the acupuncture procedure was appraised by the STRICTA criteria. RESULTS: Twenty RCTs were identified for detailed analysis. Majority of the RCTs concluded that TNA was significantly more effective than benzodiazepines for treating insomnia, with mean effective rates for acupuncture and benzodiazepines being 91% and 75%, respectively. In two more appropriately conducted trials, TNA appeared to be more efficacious in improving sleep than sleep hygiene counseling and sham acupuncture. Standardized and individualized acupuncture had similar effective rates. Despite these positive outcomes, there were methodological shortcomings in the studies reviewed, including imprecise diagnostic procedure, problems with randomization, blinding issues, and insufficient safety data. Hence, the superior efficacy of TNA over other treatments could not be ascertained. CONCLUSION: Since the majority of evidence regarding TNA for insomnia is based on studies with poor-quality research designs, the data, while somewhat promising, do not allow a clear conclusion on the benefits of TNA for insomnia. Moreover, the results support the need for large scale placebo-controlled double-blinded trials  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1384  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Linde, K.; Vickers, A.; Hondras, M.; ter Riet, G.; Thormahlen, J.; Berman, B.; Melchart, D. url  openurl
  Title Systematic reviews of complementary therapies – an annotated bibliography. Part 1: Acupuncture Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 3-  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Drug Addiction; Asthma; Emesis; Homeopathy; Nausea; Pain; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Rheumatic Diseases; Sham Control; Smoking Cessation; Systematic Review; Tinnitus; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with acupuncture. Potentially relevant reviews were searched through the register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and bibliographies of articles and books. To be included articles had to review prospective clinical trials of acupuncture; had to describe review methods explicitly; had to be published; and had to focus on treatment effects. Information on conditions, interventions, methods, results and conclusions was extracted using a pretested form and summarized descriptively. RESULTS: From a total of 48 potentially relevant reviews preselected in a screeening process 39 met the inclusion criteria. 22 were on various pain syndromes or rheumatic diseases. Other topics addressed by more than one review were addiction, nausea, asthma and tinnitus. Almost unanimously the reviews state that acupuncture trials include too few patients. Often included trials are heterogeneous regarding patients, interventions and outcome measures, are considered to have insufficient quality and contradictory results. Convincing evidence is available only for postoperative nausea, for which acupuncture appears to be of benefit, and smoking cessation, where acupuncture is no more effective than sham acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: A large number of systematic reviews on acupuncture exists. What is most obvious from these reviews is the need for (the funding of) well-designed, larger clinical trials  
  Address Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, Department of Internal Medicine II, Technische Universitat, Munchen, Kaiserstr 9, 80801 Munchen, Germany. Klaus.Linde@lrz.tu-muenchen.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 730  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duan, G.; He, J.; Zeng, Z.; Tang, Q.; Sun, S. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of Effects of Acupuncture on Cerebral Infarction in Different Parts Type of Study RCT
  Year 1998 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Acupunct-Moxibustion  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 3-7  
  Keywords Cerebral Infarction; Stroke; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract 92 cases of acute cerebral infarction confirmed by CT were assigned to cerebral hemisphere surface infarction group and cerebral hemisphere deep infarction group according to infarction parts. The two groups were further divided randomly into acupuncture groups and simple drug control groups, respectively, i.e, surface infarction acupuncture group, surface infarction control group, deep infarction acupuncture group and deep infarction control group. Changes of nervous function before and after treatment were investigated in the 4 groups. Results indicated that acupuncture treatment had a definite therapeutic effect on acute cerebral infarction, but it had different effects on cerebral infarction of different parts, that is, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cerebral suface infarction was superior to that on deep infarction. It is suggested that effects of acupuncture are related closely with the infarction part.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 30  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 92  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Cerebral Infarction
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 265  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gang, O. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Various Stimulation Methods on Bone Mineral Densitiy in Patients with Primary Osteoporosis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Internat J Clin Acupunct  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 124-127  
  Keywords Miscellaneous; Osteoporosis; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; Moxibustion; AcuTrials  
  Abstract Objective: To explore a method for increasing bone mineral density in the patient with primary osteoporosis. Methods: Sixty-two cases of primary osteoporosis were randomly divided into the acupuncture group of 32 cases and the moxibustion group of 30 cases. They were treated by acupuncture or moxibustion at Zusanli (ST36), Guanyuan (CV4), Pishu (BL20), Shenshu (BL23), Taixi (KI3) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) respectively. Results: Acupuncture or moxibustion both can increase the bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (P<0.01, P<0.05), with acupuncture being better than that of moxibustion (P<0.05). Conclusion: The therapeutic effects of acupuncture is superior to that of moxibustion in treatment of primary osteoporosis.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 90  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 62  
  Time in Treatment 24 Weeks Condition Osteoporosis
  Disease Category Miscellaneous OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 355  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, M. S.; Shin, B. C.; Choi, S. M.; Kim, J. Y. url  openurl
  Title Randomized clinical trials of constitutional acupuncture: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 6 Suppl 1 Issue Pages 59-64  
  Keywords Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Korean Acupuncture Style; Systematic Review  
  Abstract The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD). Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85-2.54, P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 0.00, P = 0.96, I(2) = 0%). Our results provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of constitutional acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls  
  Address Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, 305-811, South Korea. drmslee@gmail.com; mslee@kiom.re.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 653  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Foster, N. E.; Thomas, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hay, E. M. url  openurl
  Title The relationship between patient and practitioner expectations and preferences and clinical outcomes in a trial of exercise and acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication European journal of pain : EJP Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pain  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; Miscellaneous; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Osteoarthritis, Knee; Patient-Practitioner Relationship; RCT; Sham Control; Usual Care Control, Educational; Usual Care Control, Physical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Arthritis  
  Abstract We investigated the relationship between patient and therapist preferences and expectations and clinical outcomes in a trial of exercise and acupuncture for clinical knee osteoarthritis. 352 Patients were randomised to advice and exercise or advice and exercise plus true or non-penetrating acupuncture. Before randomisation, patients recorded their general outcome expectations, treatment-specific preferences and expectations. Clinical outcome was (a) change scores on the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and (b) treatment response according to the OMERACT-OARSI criteria. Physiotherapists recorded their treatment expectations and preferences for each patient following an assessment prior to randomisation. We investigated the relationship between (a) patient, (b) therapist and (c) matched patient-therapist preferences and expectations on clinical outcomes using univariate and multivariate analyses. There was no significant relationship between patients' treatment preferences and clinical outcomes at 6 or 12months nor between patients' expectations and pain (WOMAC) at 6 or 12months. Using our secondary outcome (OMERART-OARSI), those who received the treatment for which they had high expectations of benefit were almost twice as likely to be classified as a treatment responder at 6months (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95% Confidence Interval 1.06, 2.79)) and 12months (OR) 1.9 (1.13, 3.13). Therapists' preferences and expectations for individual patients did not add further explanation of outcomes. There was no evidence of a relationship between patients' treatment preferences or expectations and pain reduction. We found weak evidence, from secondary outcomes, that patients' expectations, both general and treatment-specific, are related to clinical outcome from exercise and acupuncture  
  Address Arthritis Research Campaign National Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up 52 Weeks Frequency N/A Number of Participants 352  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 334  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu Ng, E. H.; So, W. S.; Gao, J.; Wong, Y. Y.; Ho, P. C. url  openurl
  Title The role of acupuncture in the management of subfertility Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Fertil Steril  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Embryo Transfer; Pain; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Pregnancy Rate; Women's Health; Systematic Review; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; AcuTrials; Fertilization In Vitro; In Vitro Fertilization  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review systematically the use of acupuncture in the management of subfertility. DESIGN: A computer search was performed via several English and Chinese databases to identify journals relevant to the subject. RESULT(S): The positive effect of acupuncture in the treatment of subfertility may be related to the central sympathetic inhibition by the endorphin system, the change in uterine blood flow and motility, and stress reduction. Acupuncture may help restore ovulation in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, although there are not enough randomized studies to validate this. There is also no sufficient evidence supporting the role of acupuncture in male subfertility, as most of the studies are uncontrolled case reports or case series in which the sample sizes were small. Despite these deficiencies, acupuncture can be considered as an effective alternative for pain relief during oocyte retrieval in patients who cannot tolerate side effects of conscious sedation. The pregnancy rate of IVF treatment is significantly increased, especially when acupuncture is administered on the day of embryo transfer. CONCLUSION(S): Although acupuncture has gained increasing popularity in the management of subfertility, its effectiveness has remained controversial  
  Address Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1395  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zheng, Z.; Guo, R. J.; Helme, R. D.; Muir, A.; Da, Costa C.; Xue, C. C. url  openurl
  Title The effect of electroacupuncture on opioid-like medication consumption by chronic pain patients: a pilot randomized controlled clinical trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pain  
  Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 671-676  
  Keywords Analgesia; Electroacupuncture; Pain; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Penetrating Sham; Sham Control; Superficial Needling Depth; Sham Electroacupuncture; Sham Acupoint Control; AcuTrials;  
  Abstract Opioid-like medications (OLM) are commonly used by patients with various types of chronic pain, but their long-term benefit is questionable. Electroacupuncture (EA) has been previously shown beneficial in reducing post-operative acute OLM consumption. In this pilot randomized controlled trial, the effect of EA on OLM usage and associated side effects in chronic pain patients was evaluated. After a two-week baseline assessment, participants using OLM for their non-malignant chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive either real EA (REA, n=17) or sham EA (SEA, n=18) treatment twice weekly for 6 weeks before entering a 12-week follow-up. Pain, OLM consumption and their side effects were recorded daily. Participants also completed the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), SF-36 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline, and at the 5th, 8th, 12th, 16th and 20th week. Nine participants withdrew during the treatment period with another three during the follow-up period. Intention to treat analysis was applied. At the end of treatment period, reductions of OLM consumption in REA and SEA were 39% and 25%, respectively (p=0.056), but this effect did not last more than 8 weeks after treatment. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to reduction of side effects and pain and the improvement of depression and quality of life. In conclusion, REA demonstrates promising short-term reduction of OLM for participants with chronic non-malignant pain, but such effect needs to be confirmed by trials with adequate sample sizes  
  Address Division of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Science, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Melbourne, Victoria 3083, Australia. Zhen.zheng@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 12 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 35  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1477  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Endres, H. G.; Diener, H. C.; Molsberger, A. url  openurl
  Title Role of acupuncture in the treatment of migraine Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2007 Publication Expert review of neurotherapeutics Abbreviated Journal Expert Rev Neurother  
  Volume 7 Issue 9 Pages 1121-1134  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Migraine; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Headache Disorders  
  Abstract Since the last Cochrane review of acupuncture and headache in 2001, which found methodological and/or reporting shortcomings in the majority of the studies, several large, randomized trials on the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for headache have been published. Following a brief overview of the pathophysiology of migraine and possible action mechanisms of acupuncture, we look at current studies on acupuncture and migraine and discuss the results. From these results and our own studies on acupuncture and migraine, we conclude that a 6-week course of acupuncture is not inferior to a 6-month prophylactic drug treatment, but that specific Chinese point selection, point stimulation and needling depth are not as important as had been thought. The review suggests that acupuncture should be integrated into existing migraine therapy protocols  
  Address Ruhr University Bochum, Department of Medical Informatics, Statistics & Epidemiology, D-44801 Bochum, Germany. heinz.endres@ruhr-uni-bochum.de  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Migraine
  Disease Category Headache Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 293  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Helmreich, R. J.; Shiao, S. Y.; Dune, L. S. url  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of Acustimulation Effects on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Women Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal Explore (NY)  
  Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 412-421  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Emesis; Meta-Analysis; Nausea; Systematic Review; Morning Sickness; AcuTrials; Vomiting; Nausea and Vomiting; Women's Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to examine the effects of acustimulation (AS) on the prevention of nausea and vomiting in pregnant women (NVP). METHODS: Meta-analysis of effects of acustimulations (ie, acupressure, acupuncture, and electrical stimulation [ETS]) on NVP was conducted. Fourteen trials, eight random controlled trials (RCTs), with one RCT having two treatment modalities with four groups, and six crossover controlled trials (N = 1655) published over the last 16 years were evaluated for quality according to the Quality of Reports of Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (QUORUM) guidelines. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from the data provided by the investigators of the original trials. RESULTS: Before the treatment, 100% of the women (13 trials, n = 1615 women) were nauseated, but and 96.6% (1599/1655) reported vomiting. After the treatment, compared with the controls, AS (all modalities combined) reduced the proportion of nausea (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.35-0.62, P < .0001) and vomiting (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.51-0.68, P < .0001). Acupressure methods applied by finger pressure or wristband reduced NVP. The ETS method was also effective in reducing NVP. However, the acupuncture method did not show effects on reducing NVP. There was a placebo effect when compared with controls in reducing nausea (three trials, RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.39-1.02, P = .0479) and vomiting (five trials, RR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.50-0.91, P = .0084). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrates that acupressure and ETS had greater impact than the acupuncture methods in the treatment of NVP. However, the number of acupuncture trials was limited for pregnant women, perhaps because it is impossible to self-administer the acupuncture and thus inconvenient for women experiencing NVP as chronic symptoms  
  Address School of Nursing, Houston Baptist University, Houston, TX  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Morning Sickness
  Disease Category Vomiting OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 450  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cao, Hui-juan; Yang, Guo-yan; Wang, Yu-yi; Liu, Jian-ping url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupoint Stimulation for Acne: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal Medical Acupuncture  
  Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 173-194  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Skin Diseases; Acne Vulgaris; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupoint stimulation- including acupunture, moxibustion, cupping, acupoint injection, and acupoint catgut embedding- has shown a beneficial effect for treating acne.. However, comprehensive evaluation of current clinical evidence is lacking. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of all acupoint stimulation techniques used to treat acne vulgaris. DESIGN: A systematic review was conducted. It included only randomized controlled trials on acupoint stimulation for acne. Six electronic databases were searched for English and Chinese language studies. All searches ended in May 2012. Studies were selected for elegibility and assessed for quality. RevMan 5.1 software was used for data analysis with an effect estimate presented as risk ratios (RR) or mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). PATIENTS: Studies with subjects who were diagnosed with acne vulgaris, or papulopapustular, inflammatory, adolescent, or ploymorphic acne – regardless of gender, age, and ethnicity – were included. INTERVENTION: Interventions included any acupoint stumuation technique – such as acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, acupoint injection, acupoint catgut embedding -compared with no treatment, placebo, or conventional pharmaceutical medication. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Reduction of signs and symptoms and presence of adverse effects were examined. RESULTS: Forty-three trials involving 3453 patients with acne were included. The methodological quality of trials was gernally poor in terms of randomization, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Meta-analyses showed significant differences in increasing the number of cured patients between acupuncture plus herbal medicine and herbal medicine alone (RR: 1.60; 95% CI; 1.19-2.14; P=0.002), and between acupuncture plus herbal facial mask and herbal facial mask alone (RR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.29-3.55; P=0.003). Cupping theraopy was significantly better than pharmaceutical medications for increasing the number of cured patients (RR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.45-3.07; P<0.0001). Serious adverse events were not reported in all included trials. CONCLUSIONS: Acupoint stimulation therapies combined with other treatments appears to be effective for acne. However, further large, rigorously designed trials are needed to confirm these findings. KEY WORDS: Acne; Acupoint Stimulation, Systematic Review;  
  Address Centre for Evidence-based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 88# Mail Box, Bei San Huan Dong Lu 11, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100029, China  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Acne Vulgaris
  Disease Category Skin Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mannix, Sharon M.; O'Sullivan, Cliona; Kelly, Grainne A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for Managing Phantom-Limb Syndrome: A Systematic Review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal Medical Acupuncture  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 23-42  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Pain; Phantom Limb Syndrome; Pain, Postoperative; Acupuncture; Systematic Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Phantom-limb syndrome can significantly impact on amputees' quality of life and their functional capacity. Conventional treatment approaches have a poor rate of success in alleviating symptoms. Acupuncture has been advocated as an effective alternative treatment; however, there has not been a systematic review of the evidence base for this. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of acupuinuture treatment in the management of phantom-limb syndrome. METHODS: This review comprised three phases: (1) an electronic database search to identify potential articles; (2) extraction of data from accepted articles; and (3) rating of internal validity and strengh of the evidences provided in the accepted articles. OUTCOME MEASURES: An Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool (quantitative studies), a Critical Appraisal Skills Programme quality assessment tool (qualatative studies), and Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines (strength of evidence) were used to assess the evidence. RESULTS: Level C evidence showed acupuncture treatment reduced phantom-limb pain and sensation (14 studies), improved functional capacity or mobility (5 stidues), and reduced levels of analgesic use (3 studies). CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture therapy has been shown to have a positive effect on the symptoms of phantom-limb syndrome. However, further investigations of superior quality are needed to support these findings and determine the most effective method of acupuncture for this purpose. KEY WORDS: Acupuncture; Phantom Limb; Amputee;  
  Address School of Public Health, Physiotherapy, and Population Sciences, Health Sciences Centre, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Phantom Limb
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 821  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chao, L. F.; Zhang, A. L.; Liu, H. E.; Cheng, M. H.; Lam, H. B.; Lo, S. K. url  openurl
  Title The efficacy of acupoint stimulation for the management of therapy-related adverse events in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Breast cancer research and treatment Abbreviated Journal Breast Cancer Res Treat  
  Volume Issue Pages -  
  Keywords Acupressure; Acupuncture; AcuTrials; Breast Cancer; Systematic Review; Neoplasms; Cancer  
  Abstract The aim of the present study was to scrutinize the evidence on the use of acupoint stimulation for managing therapy-related adverse events in breast cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted on eight English and Chinese databases to identify clinical trials designed to examine the efficacy of acupressure, acupuncture, or acupoint stimulation (APS) for the management of adverse events due to treatments of breast cancer. Methodological quality of the trials was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. Using pre-determined keywords, 843 possibly relevant titles were identified. Eventually 26 papers, 18 in English and eight in Chinese, satisfied the inclusion criteria and entered the quality assessment stage. The 26 articles were published between 1999 and 2008. They assessed the application of acupoint stimulation on six disparate conditions related to anticancer therapies including vasomotor syndrome, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, post-operation pain, aromatase inhibitors-related joint pain and leukopenia. Modalities of acupoint stimulation used included traditional acupuncture, acupressure, electroacupuncture, and the use of magnetic device on acupuncture points. Overall, 23 trials (88%) reported positive outcomes on at least one of the conditions examined. However, only nine trials (35%) were of high quality; they had a modified Jadad score of 3 or above. Three high quality trials revealed that acupoint stimulation on P6 (NeiGuang) was beneficial to chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. For other adverse events, the quality of many of the trials identified was poor; no conclusive remarks can be made. Very few minor adverse events were observed, and only in five trials. APS, in particular acupressure on the P6 acupoint, appears beneficial in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, especially in the acute phase. More well-designed trials using rigorous methodology are required to evaluate the effectiveness of acupoint stimulation interventions on managing other distress symptoms  
  Address School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Gueishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Breast cancer
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Suzuki, M.; Yokoyama, Y.; Yamazaki, H. url  openurl
  Title Research into acupuncture for respiratory disease in Japan: a systematic review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 54-60  
  Keywords Respiratory Tract Diseases; Systematic Review; AcuTrials; Acupuncture; Asthma; COPD; Bronchitis; Pneumonia; Common Cold; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In Japan, studies on acupuncture therapy for respiratory disease have rarely been reported. Additionally, most of the reports are difficult for overseas researchers to access because they are written in Japanese and cannot be located using Medline. Purpose: To review studies on acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for respiratory disease conducted in Japan. Data sources: The results of a literature search using “Igaku Chuo Zasshi Web” and the Medical Online Library, both of which are Japanese databases, covering the period between 1979 and 2006. Study selection: This study reviewed references cited in retrieved documents and selected original articles and case reports on acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for respiratory disease. Data extraction: The search terms used were “acupuncture” and “respiratory disease”, along with “respiratory”, “asthma”, “COPD”, “bronchitis” and “common cold”. RESULTS: The study retrieved 34 papers on acupuncture treatment for respiratory disease written in Japanese (9 full papers, 19 case reports and 6 case series). The papers dealt with such conditions as asthma (14 trials), cough variant asthma (one trial), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (seven trials), chronic bronchitis (one trial), usual/idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (one trial) and the common cold (two trials). The study also found eight trials dealing with cold prevention. CONCLUSIONS: A small number of reports on acupuncture and moxibustion treatment for respiratory diseases were found in the Japanese databases. Future studies must use more rigorous evaluation methods, such as randomised controlled trials, to measure the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for treating respiratory diseases  
  Address Meiji University of Integrative Medicine, Department of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Honoda Hiyoshi-cho Nantan City, Kyoto 629-0392, Japan; masuzuki@meiji-u.ac.jp  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
  Disease Category Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1137  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Balk, J.; Day, R.; Rosenzweig, M.; Beriwal, S. url  openurl
  Title Pilot, randomized, modified, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Soc.Integr.Oncol.  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 4-11  
  Keywords Cancer-Related Fatigue; Neoplasms; Fatigue; RCT; Acu Versus Sham; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Heat Lamp; Sham Control; Non Penetrating Sham, Electrical; Non Penetrating Sham, Mechanical; Verum Acupoint Control; AcuTrials; Cancer;  
  Abstract Cancer-related fatigue is a substantial problem for cancer patients and their caregivers, but no effective treatment exists. Acupuncture has been suggested to improve cancer-related fatigue, but no randomized clinical trials have been conducted. We hypothesized that true acupuncture, compared with sham acupuncture, would reduce cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients receiving external radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to determine effect size and feasibility. A modified, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. The subject, clinical staff, and assessor were blinded, but the acupuncturist was not. Subjects received acupuncture once to twice per week during the 6-week course of radiation therapy. Data were collected at baseline, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks, which was 4 weeks after that last radiation session. Twenty-seven subjects enrolled, and 23 completed the last data collection. Both true and sham acupuncture groups had improved fatigue, fatigue distress, quality of life, and depression from baseline to 10 weeks, but the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The true acupuncture group improved 5.50 (SE, +/- 1.48) points on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Subscale (FACIT-F), whereas the sham acupuncture group improved by 3.73 (SE +/- 1.92) points. This difference was not statistically significant (p = .37). All subjects guessed that they were in the true acupuncture group. Our study was underpowered to find a statistically significant difference. To demonstrate a statistically significant improvement between true and sham acupuncture would require 75 subjects per group in a future study. Owing to poor recruitment, the feasibility of a larger trial using the same methodology is low. Despite being underpowered, it appears that subjects receiving true acupuncture may benefit more than subjects receiving sham acupuncture. In the discussion section, we review our experience with using a sham-needle controlled study  
  Address Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 9  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 27  
  Time in Treatment 6 Weeks Condition Fatigue
  Disease Category Neoplasms OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 54  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Szczurko, O.; Cooley, K.; Mills, E. J.; Zhou, Q.; Perri, D.; Seely, D. url  openurl
  Title Naturopathic treatment of rotator cuff tendinitis among canadian postal workers: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum  
  Volume 61 Issue 8 Pages 1037-1045  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Shoulder Pain; Shoulder Impingement Syndrome; Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; RCT; Acu Versus Usual Care; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture + Other; Usual Care Control, Physical; AcuTrials; Soft Tissue Injuries; TCM Acupuncture Style; Pain; Sprains and Strains  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the effectiveness of naturopathic care (NC) on rotator cuff tendinitis using a prospective randomized clinical trial design. METHODS: Canadian postal workers with rotator cuff tendinitis for a duration of >6 weeks were randomized to receive NC (n = 43) or standardized physical exercises (PEs; n = 42) over 12 weeks. Participants in the NC group received dietary counseling, acupuncture, and Phlogenzym (2 tablets 3 times/day). The PE intervention group received passive, active-assisted, and active range of motion exercises and matched placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and secondary outcomes were the pain visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile (MYMOP), and shoulder maximal range of motion. Participants and assessors were blinded to group and placebo allocation. RESULTS: Seventy-seven participants (87%) completed >/=8 weeks of the trial. Final total SPADI scores decreased by 54.5% (P < 0.0001) in the NC group and by 18% (P = 0.0241) in the PE group. Between-group differences in changes to SPADI scores showed statistically significant decreases in shoulder pain and disability in the NC group compared with the PE group (P < 0.0001). Significant differences between groups were also observed in the pain VAS, MYMOP, SF-36, and shoulder extension, flexion, and abduction, with the NC group showing superiority in each outcome. No serious adverse reactions were observed. CONCLUSION: NC and PE provided significant improvements, with greater improvement in shoulder function in the NC group compared with the PE group. Statistically significant improvements in quality of life measures were observed in the NC group as compared with the PE group  
  Address Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 85  
  Time in Treatment 12 Weeks Condition Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1139  
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Author Ho, M.; Huang, L. C.; Chang, Y. Y.; Chen, H. Y.; Chang, W. C.; Yang, T. C.; Tsai, H. D. url  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture Reduces Uterine Artery Blood Flow Impedance in Infertile Women Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Taiwan J O  
  Volume 48 Issue 2 Pages 148-151  
  Keywords Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; In Vitro Fertilization; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; AcuTrials; Infertility, Female; Fertilization In Vitro  
  Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on pregnancy rate and uterine artery blood flow impedance in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Materials and Methods: This prospective, randomized trial was carried out in the IVF center of China Medical University Hospital in Taiwan, from February 1, 2004 to January 30, 2005. A total of 44 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 30 were allocated to acupuncture, and 14 were allocated to no acupuncture. EA was performed four times, twice a week for 2 weeks, from day 2 of the study to the day before oocyte retrieval. After patients felt the needle reaction, the needles were attached to an electrical stimulator for 30 minutes. Clinical pregnancy and pulsatility index (PI) of right and left uterine arteries before and after EA were measured. Results: There was no significant difference in pregnancy rate between the two groups (acupuncture group, 30%; non-acupuncture group, 28.6%). The mean PI of both uterine arteries was significantly reduced after EA (left uterine artery, 2.3 to 2.0; right uterine artery, 2.4 to 2.2). There was no significant change in PI in the group with no acupuncture (left uterine artery, 2.5 to 2.3; right uterine artery, 2.4 to 2.3). Conclusion: EA could be useful for reducing uterine artery blood flow impedance, but did not increase the pregnancy rate in patients undergoing IVF  
  Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 44  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Fertilization In Vitro
  Disease Category Reproductive Techniques, Assisted OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 456  
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Author El-Rakshy, M.; Clark, S. C.; Thompson, J.; Thant, M. url  openurl
  Title Effect of intraoperative electroacupuncture on postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, nausea and sedation: a randomised controlled trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 9-12  
  Keywords Pain, Postoperative; Anesthesia and Analgesia; RCT; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Pharmaceutical; AcuTrials; Hysterectomy; Cholecystectomy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has potential value in producing analgesia in the postoperative period, but previous trials have inconsistent results. We aimed to study the effect of electroacupuncture on pain and nausea and the requirement for postoperative analgesia via patient-controlled analgesia. METHOD: 107 patients who were undergoing abdominal hysterectomy or laparascopic cholecystectomy were randomised to receive either electroacupuncture (n = 56) or no additional treatment (n = 46) during the operative period. We measured the use of patient-controlled analgesia and time in recovery as well as pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and sedation. 102 patients were included in the analysis. The majority of patients were female: the laparoscopic cholecystectomy group included 10 males. Adhesive dressings were placed over all acupuncture points in both groups, to ensure blinding of patients and assessors during the recovery period. RESULTS: The electroacupuncture group had a longer duration of operation but the difference was not statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the groups for the requirement for patient-controlled analgesia or total time in recovery. Pain scores were marginally lower in the acupuncture group, but not significantly, and there were no differences between the groups in nausea or sedation scores. CONCLUSION: Electroacupuncture at 10 Hz given under general anaesthetic has no effect on postoperative nausea or analgesic requirement. Future studies should investigate acupuncture given before or after surgery  
  Address Scunthorpe General Hospital, North Lincolnshire, UK; elrakshy@btinternet.com  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 107  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Pain, Postoperative
  Disease Category Anesthesia and Analgesia OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 283  
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Author Lin, Z. P.; Lan, L. W.; He, T. Y.; Lin, S. P.; Lin, J. G.; Jang, T. R.; Ho, T. J. url  openurl
  Title Effects of acupuncture stimulation on recovery ability of male elite basketball athletes Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication The American journal of Chinese medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Chin Med  
  Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 471-481  
  Keywords Athletic Performance; Sports Medicine; RCT; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Standard Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control; No Treatment Control; AcuTrials; Athletes; Exercise  
  Abstract Developing effective methods for helping athletes recover from muscle fatigue is deemed essential, particularly on the eves' important competitions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on athletes' recovery abilities. Subjects were selected from 30 male elite university basketball players who were randomly assigned to 3 groups: acupuncture group, sham group, and normal (control) group, each containing 10 subjects. Acupuncture was carried out on each athlete in acupuncture group at the Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36) acupoints, beginning at 15 min prior to exercise and continuing until exhaustion of the subject. Similar acupuncture was also carried out on each athlete in the sham group but the positions were 1 cm away from the PC6 and ST36 acupoints. No acupuncture was conducted on the athletes in the normal group. During the experiments, each subject performed separate runs on the treadmill. The data of heart rate (HR(max)), oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), and blood lactic acid were measured during the rest period and at 3 recovery points of time (5th, 30th and 60th min) post-exercise. The results showed that the acupuncture group (PC6 and ST36) has significantly lower HR(max), VO(2max) and blood lactic acid than both the sham and normal groups at the 30th min post-exercise. Blood lactic acid of the acupuncture group was also significantly lower than that of the other two groups in the 60th min post-exercise. Our findings have shed some light on the development of effective acupuncture schemes to enhance the recovery ability for elite basketball athletes  
  Address Department of Holistic Wellness, MingDao University, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 1  
  Treatment Follow-up N/A Frequency N/A Number of Participants 30  
  Time in Treatment N/A Condition Athletic Performance
  Disease Category Sports Medicine OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 722  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taechaarpornkul, W.; Suvapan, D.; Theppanom, C.; Chanthipwaree, C.; Chirawatkul, A. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of the effectiveness of six and two acupuncture point regimens in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomised trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 3-8  
  Keywords Arthritis; Osteoarthritis, Knee; RCT; Acu Versus CAM Control; Acu Versus Acu; Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; CAM Control; AcuTrials  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although substantial data have supported the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis (OA), the number of points used has varied. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of six and two acupuncture points in the treatment of knee OA. METHODS: A randomised trial of knee OA patients was conducted. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 35. The “six point group” received treatment at six acupuncture points, ST35, EX-LE4 (Neixiyan), ST36, SP9, SP10 and ST34, while the “two point group” received treatment at just the first pair of points, ST35 and EX-LE4. Both groups received twice weekly electroacupuncture on 10 occasions. Electrical stimulation was carried out at low-frequency of 3 Hz to all points, with the intensity as high as tolerable. Both groups were allowed to take a 200 mg celecoxib capsule per day for intolerable pain. Patients were assessed at baseline, week 5, week 9 and week 13, using a Thai language version of the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Global assessment of change after 10 treatments was also recorded. RESULTS: Acupuncture at both six and two acupuncture points was associated with significant improvement. Mean total WOMAC score at weeks 5 and 13 of patients in both groups showed no significant difference statistically (p = 0.75 and p = 0.51). Moreover, the number of celecoxib capsules taken, global assessment of global change and body weight change of both groups also showed no statistical difference. CONCLUSION: This evidence suggests that electroacupuncture to two local points may be sufficient to treat knee OA, but in view of some limitations to this study further research is necessary before this can be stated conclusively  
  Address Sirindhorn National Medical Rehabilitation Center, 88/26 Soi Bamrasnaradura, Tiwanon Road, Nonthaburi 11000, Thailand; wiratt@health.moph.go.th  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 10  
  Treatment Follow-up 8 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 70  
  Time in Treatment 5 Weeks Condition Osteoarthritis, Knee
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1142  
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