toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/acutrialsocom/public_html/refbase-ocom/includes/include.inc.php on line 5275
  Record Links
Author Choi, S. M.; Park, J. E.; Li, S. S.; Jung, H.; Zi, M.; Kim, T. H.; Jung, S.; Kim, A.; Shin, M.; Sul, J. U.; Hong, Z.; Jiping, Z.; Lee, S.; Liyun, H.; Kang, K.; Baoyan, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial testing the effects of acupuncture on allergic rhinitis Type of Study RCT
  Year 2013 Publication Allergy Abbreviated Journal Allergy  
  Volume 68 Issue 3 Pages 365-374  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Rhinitis, Allergic; Respiratory Tract Diseases; Acu Versus > 1 Control; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Wait-List Control; Sham Control; Penetrating Sham; Superficial Needling Depth; Near Verum Acupoint Control  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment for allergic rhinitis. METHODS: This study was a multicenter, randomized, parallel-controlled study. Participants were randomized to either the active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or waitlist groups. The active and sham acupuncture groups received acupuncture treatment three times per week for 4 weeks. In the sham group, minimal acupuncture at nonacupuncture points was used. The waitlist group did not receive any acupuncture treatment. RESULTS: Of the 238 participants, 97, 94, and 47 individuals were assigned to the active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and waitlist group, respectively. After the treatment, the difference in the total nasal symptom score (TNSS) was significantly reduced in the active acupuncture group compared with the sham acupuncture (difference: -1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.96, -0.09, P = 0.03) and waitlist (difference: -2.49, 95% CI: -3.68, -1.29, P < 0.0001). The active acupuncture group exhibited a significant change in the total non-nasal symptom score (TNNSS) compared with the waitlist (difference: -0.78, 95% CI: -1.22, -0.34, P = 0.0002), but not the sham acupuncture group (difference; 0.15, 95% CI: -0.21, 0.5, P = 0.56). Both active and sham acupuncture treatments resulted in significant improvements in TNSS and TNNSS compared to baseline. CONCLUSION: Active acupuncture showed a significantly greater effect on symptoms of allergic rhinitis than either sham acupuncture or no active treatment. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis decreased significantly after treatment in the both acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective and safe treatment for allergic rhinitis.  
  Address Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea. smchoi@kiom.re.kr  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments 12  
  Treatment Follow-up 4 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 238  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Rhinitis, Allergic
  Disease Category (up) Respiratory Tract Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 182  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: