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Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2594  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2668  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2709  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2717  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2799  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2840  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (down) Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2922  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dimitrova, A.; Murchison, C.; Oken, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 164-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Neuropathy; Neuropathic Pain; Polyneuropathy; Mononeuropathy  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVES: Neuropathy and its associated pain pose great therapeutic challenges. While there has been a recent surge in acupuncture use and research, little remains known about its effects on nerve function. This review aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of neuropathy of various etiologies. METHODS: The Medline, AMED, Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL, and clintrials.gov databases were systematically searched from inception to July 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing acupuncture's efficacy for poly- and mononeuropathy were reviewed. Parallel and crossover RCTs focused on acupuncture's efficacy were reviewed and screened for eligibility. The Scale for Assessing Scientific Quality of Investigations in Complementary and Alternative Medicine was used to assess RCT quality. RCTs with score of >9 and active control treatments such as sham acupuncture or medical therapy were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies were included: 13 original RCTs, a long-term follow-up, and a re-analysis of a prior RCT. The selected RCTs studied acupuncture for neuropathy caused by diabetes, Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and idiopathic conditions. Acupuncture regimens, control conditions, and outcome measures differed among studies, and various methodological issues were identified. Still, the majority of RCTs showed benefit for acupuncture over control in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, Bell's palsy, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Acupuncture is probably effective in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathy, and there is insufficient evidence for its benefits in idiopathic neuropathy. Acupuncture appears to improve nerve conduction study parameters in both sensory and motor nerves. Meta-analyses were conducted on all diabetic neuropathy and Bell's palsy individual subject data (six RCTs; a total of 680 subjects) using a summary estimate random effects model, which showed combined odds ratio of 4.23 (95% confidence interval 2.3-7.8; p < 0.001) favoring acupuncture over control for neuropathic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is beneficial in some peripheral neuropathies, but more rigorously designed studies using sham-acupuncture control are needed to characterize its effect and optimal use better.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, OR  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2209  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract (down) Objective: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat deposition are the most important risk factors for women's health. Acupuncture, including electroacupuncture (EA), is used to treat obesity throughout the world. The effect of EA is evaluated mainly by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Few studies have assessed its effect in reducing VAT volume and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) based on an exact measurement method such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to resolve this issue. Methods: Thirty subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The control group ( n = 15) did not receive any intervention and maintained a normal diet and their usual exercise habits. The treatment group ( n = 15) received EA three times a week for 3 months. BMI and WC were measured using different devices. VAT and HFF were measured by MRI and calculated by related software before and after the intervention. Results: A marked difference was evident in group that received EA treatment in the following tests. The differences in BMI (U = 21.00, p < 0.001), WC (U = 40.50, p = 0.002), VAT volume (U = 13.00, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (U = 0.00, p < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the treatment group were distinct and significant compared with those of the control group. Three months later, the treatment group showed a lower BMI (W = 91.00, p = 0.001), WC ( t = 4.755, p < 0.001), VAT volume ( t = 5.164, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (W = 120.00, p = 0.001) compared with pretreatment levels. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed a lower VAT volume ( t = 60.00, p = 0.029) after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months, the control group showed higher mean HFF ( t = ?2.900, p = 0.012) and VAT volume (W = 11.50, p = 0.006) compared with their initial levels. Conclusion: Based on MRI evaluation, this randomized controlled study proved that EA treatment reduces BMI and WC as well as VAT volume and HFF in women with abdominal obesity.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2228  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, H.; Adams, C.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese medicine for schizophrenia: A survey of randomized trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists Abbreviated Journal Asia Pac Psychiatry  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Schizophrenia  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To survey the reports of randomized trials of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) interventions for schizophrenia and produce a broad overview of this type of research activity in this area. METHOD: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's comprehensive Trials Register (January 2016), selected all relevant randomized trials, and extracted the data within each study. Finally, we sought relevant reviews on the Cochrane Library. RESULTS: We initially screened 423 articles from which we identified 378 relevant studies randomizing 35 341 participants (average study size 94, SD 60). There were 7 herbs used as single medicine, 4 compositions or extractions, more than 144 herbal mixes, and 7 TCM principles reported for schizophrenia. Nonpharmacological interventions of TCM included acupuncture and exercise. The most commonly evaluated treatments are Ginkgo biloba, acupuncture, Wendan decoction, and Shugan Jieyu Capsule. There are 3 directly relevant Cochrane reviews. CONCLUSIONS: Most treatment approaches-and some in common use-have only one or two relevant small trials. Some coordination of effort would help ensure that further well-designed appropriately sized randomized trials are conducted. Systematic reviews should be performed in this field but with titles that take into account the complexity of TCM.  
  Address Cochrane Schizophrenia Group, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Schizophrenia
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27734592 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2186  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, J.; Li, S.-N.; Liu, L.; Zhou, K.; Li, Y.; Cui, X.-Y.; Wan, J.; Lu, J.-J.; Huang, Y.-C.; Wang, X.-S.; Lin, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conventional acupuncture for cardiac arrhythmia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arrhythmias, Cardiac  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To exam the effect and safety of conventional acupuncture (CA) on cardiac arrhythmia. METHODS: Nine medical databases were searched until February 2016 for randomized controlled trials. Heterogeneity was measured by Cochran Q test. Meta-analysis was conducted if I2 was less than 85% and the characteristics of included trials were similar. RESULTS: Nine qualified studies involving 638 patients were included. Only 1 study had definitely low risk of bias, while 7 trials were rated as unclear and 1 as high. Meta-analysis of CA alone did not have a significant benefit on response rate compared to amiodarone in patients with atrial fibrillation (Af) and atrial flutter (AF) [relative risk (RR): 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.49; P=0.61; I2=61%, P=0.11]. However, 1 study with higher methodological quality detected a lower recurrence rate of Af in CA alone as compared with sham acupuncture plus no treatment, and benefits on ventricular rate and time of conversion to normal sinus rhythm were found in CA alone group by 1 study, as well as the response rate in CA plus deslanoside group by another study. Meta-analysis of CA plus anti-arrhythmia drug (AAD) was associated with a significant benefit on the response rate when compared with AAD alone in ventricular premature beat (VPB) patients (RR, 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.34; P=0.005; I2=13%, P=0.32), and an improvement in quality-of-life score (QOLS) of VPB also showed in 1 individual study. Besides, a lower heart rate was detected in the CA alone group by 1 individual study when compared with no treatment in sinus tachycardia patients (MD-21.84 [-27.21,-16.47]) and lower adverse events of CA alone were reported than amiodarone. CONCLUSIONS: CA may be a useful and safe alternative or additive approach to AADs for cardiac arrhythmia, especially in VPB and Af patients, which mainly based on a pooled estimate and result from 1 study with higher methodological quality. However, we could not reach a robust conclusion due to low quality of overall evidence.  
  Address Department of Cardiology, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100078, China. 13910565673@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Arrhythmias, Cardiac
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28432528 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2191  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2461  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2502  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2543  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2584  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2625  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2653  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract (down) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2694  
Permanent link to this record
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