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Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2663  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2704  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2782  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2823  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2864  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2946  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hou, Z.; Xu, S.; Li, Q.; Cai, L.; Wu, W.; Yu, H.; Chen, H. url  openurl
  Title The Efficacy of Acupuncture for the Treatment of Cervical Vertigo: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-13  
  Keywords VERTIGO treatment; Acupuncture; CEREBRAL circulation; META-analysis; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research)  
  Abstract (up) Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Limited
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122942529; Source Information: 5/9/2017, p1; Subject Term: VERTIGO treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CEREBRAL circulation; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 13p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 11 Charts, 1 Graph; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2259  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ngai, S.P.C.; Spencer, L.M.; Jones, A.Y.M.; Alison, J.A. url  openurl
  Title Acu-TENS Reduces Breathlessness during Exercise in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords DYSPNEA -- Treatment; ACUPUNCTURE points; CONFIDENCE intervals; CROSSOVER trials; Exercise; OBSTRUCTIVE lung diseases; PHYSICAL fitness; TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; Walking; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; BLIND experiment; DESCRIPTIVE statistics  
  Abstract (up) Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121349879; Source Information: 2/20/2017, p1; Subject Term: DYSPNEA -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CROSSOVER trials; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: OBSTRUCTIVE lung diseases; Subject Term: PHYSICAL fitness; Subject Term: TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; Subject Term: WALKING; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: BLIND experiment; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Illustrations: 2 Color Photographs, 1 Diagram, 2 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2247  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract (up) Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2248  
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Author Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract (up) Copyright of Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine is the property of Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2251  
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Author Zhang, W.-P.; Onose, Y.; Fujikawa, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Trial Study of Moxibustion with a Warming Needle on Edema Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 20-25  
  Keywords Adult; Edema/physiopathology/*therapy; Female; Hot Temperature; Humans; Moxibustion/*instrumentation/*methods; Needles; Regional Blood Flow/physiology; Skin Temperature/physiology; Young Adult; *edema; *moxibustion; *warm acupuncture  
  Abstract (up) Edema is an accumulation of an excessive amount of watery fluid in cells or intercellular tissues. In order to examine the effects of acupuncture and moxibustion on edema, seven subjects were randomly divided into three groups, that was a Control group, an Acupuncture group (Acp), and an acupuncture and moxibustion group (Acp-Mox). After sitting for 60 minutes keeping their bodies still, the Acp and Acp-Mox subjects were administered acupuncture or acupuncture/moxibustion on the points of Zusanli (ST-36) and Sanyinjiao (SP-6), separately as against the Control group who only lied on the bed after modelization. After modelization at 60 minutes, the skin temperature and blood flow of all the groups were significantly lower in blood flow when compared with premodelization. But shortly after the procedure at 80 minutes, skin temperature in the Acp and Acp-Mox groups were significantly increased when compared with premodelization (vs. 60 minutes, p < 0.05). Moreover, the skin temperature and blood flow of the Acp-Mox group were significantly increased as compared to both the Control and the Acp group at the 80-minute time point. These results indicate that Acp and Mox-Acp could relieve edematous conditions significantly, especially the procedure of moxibustion with warming needle, was effective in improving edema which is often accompanied with cold intolerance and would be a recommended and superior therapy for edema.  
  Address Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie, Japan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28254097 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2207  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2436  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2477  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2518  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2559  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2669  
Permanent link to this record
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