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Author Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract We attempted to investigate cardioprotection of electroacupuncture (EA) for enhanced recovery after surgery on patients

undergoing heart valve replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass. Forty-four patients with acquired heart valve replacement were

randomly allocated to the EA group or the control group. Patients in the EA group received EA stimulus at bilateral Neiguan

(PC6), Ximen (PC4), Shenting (GV24), and Baihui (GV20) acupoints twenty minutes before anesthesia induction to the end of

surgery.The primary end point was cardioprotection effect of electroacupuncture postoperatively and the secondary endpoints were

quality of recovery and cognitive functioning postoperatively. The present study demonstrated that electroacupuncture reduced

the occurrence of complications and played a role of cardioprotective effect on patients after heart valve replacement surgery with

cardiopulmonary bypass, and it benefits patients more comfortable and contributes to recovery after surgery.
 
  Address (up)  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2227  
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Author Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Objective: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat deposition are the most important risk factors for women's health. Acupuncture, including electroacupuncture (EA), is used to treat obesity throughout the world. The effect of EA is evaluated mainly by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Few studies have assessed its effect in reducing VAT volume and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) based on an exact measurement method such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to resolve this issue. Methods: Thirty subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The control group ( n = 15) did not receive any intervention and maintained a normal diet and their usual exercise habits. The treatment group ( n = 15) received EA three times a week for 3 months. BMI and WC were measured using different devices. VAT and HFF were measured by MRI and calculated by related software before and after the intervention. Results: A marked difference was evident in group that received EA treatment in the following tests. The differences in BMI (U = 21.00, p < 0.001), WC (U = 40.50, p = 0.002), VAT volume (U = 13.00, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (U = 0.00, p < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the treatment group were distinct and significant compared with those of the control group. Three months later, the treatment group showed a lower BMI (W = 91.00, p = 0.001), WC ( t = 4.755, p < 0.001), VAT volume ( t = 5.164, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (W = 120.00, p = 0.001) compared with pretreatment levels. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed a lower VAT volume ( t = 60.00, p = 0.029) after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months, the control group showed higher mean HFF ( t = ?2.900, p = 0.012) and VAT volume (W = 11.50, p = 0.006) compared with their initial levels. Conclusion: Based on MRI evaluation, this randomized controlled study proved that EA treatment reduces BMI and WC as well as VAT volume and HFF in women with abdominal obesity.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2228  
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Author Xiao Wu; Cuihong Zheng; Xiaohu Xu; Pei Ding; Fan Xiong; Man Tian; Ying Wang; Haoxu Dong; Mingmin Zhang; Wei Wang; Shabei Xu; Minjie Xie; Guangying Huang url  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture for Functional Constipation: A Multicenter, Randomized, Control Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Constipation; Defecation; Electroacupuncture; GASTROINTESTINAL agents; MEDICAL cooperation; ORAL medication; PATIENT satisfaction; QUALITY of life; Research; SAMPLING (Statistics); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness  
  Abstract Background and Aim. To investigate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) with different current intensities for functional constipation (FC) and to assess whether the effects of EA with different current intensities are superior to the mosapride. Methods. Patients with FC were randomly divided into low current intensity group (LCI), high current intensity group (HCI), and mosapride group (MC). The primary outcome was three or more spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) per week and an increase of one or more SBMs from baseline during at least 3 of the 4 weeks. Results. The primary outcome was reached by 53.45%, 66.15%, and 52.24% of the patients who received LCI, HCI, and mosapride, respectively. EA can significantly improve the weekly SBMs and stool consistency and reduce straining severity ( p < 0.0001, all). HCI improved the quality of life better than mosapride ( p < 0.05) and reduced the proportion of severe constipation more than LCI and mosapride ( p < 0.05, both). Conclusions. EA is effective and safe at both current intensities for FC; therapeutic effects of LCI and HCI are not superior to mosapride. EA is superior to mosapride in improving patients’ life quality and satisfaction level of treatment; EA has fewer adverse events than mosapride.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121086632; Source Information: 1/31/2017, p1; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION; Subject Term: DEFECATION; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: GASTROINTESTINAL agents; Subject Term: MEDICAL cooperation; Subject Term: ORAL medication; Subject Term: PATIENT satisfaction; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 5 Charts, 2 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2239  
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Author Derksen, T.M.E.; Bours, M.J.L.; Mols, F.; Weijenberg, M.P. url  openurl
  Title Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords ALTERNATIVE medicine; ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; COLON tumors; DIETARY supplements; Exercise; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; PERIPHERAL neuropathy; ONLINE information services; QUALITY of life; RECTUM -- Tumors; HEALTH self-care; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Oxaliplatin; Lifestyles  
  Abstract Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121885369; Source Information: 3/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; Subject Term: COLON tumors; Subject Term: DIETARY supplements; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: PERIPHERAL neuropathy; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RECTUM -- Tumors; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: OXALIPLATIN; Subject Term: LIFESTYLES; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 14p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2283  
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Author Nakamura, S.; Horiuchi, S. url  openurl
  Title Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Effectiveness of a Self-Care Program for Pregnant Women for Relieving Hiesho Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 53-59  
  Keywords ARM -- Physiology; EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; LEG -- Physiology; PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ANALYSIS of variance; BODY temperature; CHI-squared test; CLINICAL trials; CLOTHING & dress; CONFIDENCE intervals; EXERCISE therapy; MEDICAL thermography; PROBABILITY theory; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SCALE analysis (Psychology); HEALTH self-care; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; STATISTICAL power analysis; STATISTICAL significance; SKIN temperature; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; RELATIVE risk (Medicine); PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Pregnancy; Japan  
  Abstract Background A group of adults can be identified with chronic non-responding anxiety symptoms who have repeatedly accessed treatments through their GP, such as cognitive behaviour therapy, bibliotherapy and medication, but with no effect. These patients make heavy use of health service resources with no beneficial outcome. This study aims to test the effect of an acupuncture formula of three specific acupuncture points, suggested in a previous pilot study. Method 40 participants from a psychiatry waiting list were randomised into one of two groups: group 1 (n=25) received 10 weeks of acupuncture at PC6, HT7 and LR3, and group 2 was a waiting list control group. The waiting list group (n=15) then received acupuncture. Both groups were followed up for 10 weeks after treatment. The outcome measure was the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results 36 patients completed the study, with two dropouts in each group. State anxiety scores in the acupuncture group decreased from 57.7 (SD 13.1) to 38.8 (12.0); scores in the waiting list control group decreased from 61.5 (11.6) to 60.6 (11.7). The difference was highly significant (p<0.0001). Similar changes were seen for trait anxiety scores. The control group showed similar statistically significant improvements when they received acupuncture. The improvements were maintained after 10 weeks of follow-up in each group. Conclusions Acupuncture is a promising intervention for patients with chronic anxiety symptoms that have proven resistant to other forms of treatment.  
  Address (up)  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 120746245; Source Information: Jan2017, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p53; Subject Term: ARM -- Physiology; Subject Term: EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; Subject Term: LEG -- Physiology; Subject Term: PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: BODY temperature; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: CLOTHING & dress; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: EXERCISE therapy; Subject Term: MEDICAL thermography; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: STATISTICAL power analysis; Subject Term: STATISTICAL significance; Subject Term: SKIN temperature; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: RELATIVE risk (Medicine); Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: PREGNANCY; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: JAPAN; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2288  
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Author Ee, C.; French, S.D.; Xue, C.C.; Pirotta, M.; Teede, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes: clinical evidence update and its relevance to decision making Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes. This article synthesizes the best available evidence for when women are considering whether acupuncture might be useful for menopausal hot flashes. METHODS: We searched electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. RESULTS: The overall evidence demonstrates that acupuncture is effective when compared with no treatment, but not efficacious compared with sham. Methodological challenges such as the complex nature of acupuncture treatment, the physiological effects from sham, and the significant efficacy of placebo therapy generally in treating hot flashes all impact on these considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture improves menopausal hot flashes compared with no treatment; however, not compared with sham acupuncture. This is also consistent with the evidence that a range of placebo interventions improve menopausal symptoms. As clinicians play a vital role in assisting evidence-informed decisions, we need to ensure women understand the evidence and can integrate it with personal preferences. Some women may choose acupuncture for hot flashes, a potentially disabling condition without long-term adverse health consequences. Yet, women should do so understanding the evidence, and its strengths and weaknesses, around both effective medical therapies and acupuncture. Likewise, cost to the individual and the health system needs to be considered in the context of value-based health care.  
  Address (up) 1National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia 2Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 3School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada 4School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Australia 5Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia  
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  Notes PMID:28350757 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2218  
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Author Salazar, A.P. de S.; Stein, C.; Marchese, R.R.; Plentz, R.D.M.; Pagnussat, A.D.S. url  openurl
  Title Electric Stimulation for Pain Relief in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Pain Physician Abbreviated Journal Pain Physician  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 15-25  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome whose primary symptoms include chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The treatment of patients with FM aims to provide symptomatic relief and improvement in physical capacities to perform daily tasks and quality of life. Invasive or non-invasive electric stimulation (ES) is used for pain relief in patients with FM. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of treatment with ES, combined or not combined with other types of therapy, for pain relief in patients with FM. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: Electronic search was conducted on databases (from the inception to April 2016): MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane CENTRAL), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). METHODS: Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies based on the inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of ES combined or not with other types of treatment for pain relief in patients with FM (according to the American College of Rheumatology), regardless of the ES dosages. The primary outcome was pain, assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes extracted were quality of life, assessed by short form-36 health survey (SF- 36), and fatigue, assessed by VAS. RESULTS: Nine studies were included, with 301 patients. The meta-analysis for pain showed positive effect of ES treatment versus control [-1.24 (95% CI: -2.39 to -0.08; I(2): 87%, P = 0.04) n = 8 RCTs]. The sensitivity analysis for pain showed significant results for invasive ES, combined or not with other types of therapy [-0.94 (95% CI, -1.50 to -0.38; I(2) 0%, P = 0.001) n = 3 RCTs]. No significant improvement was found regarding quality of life [-3.48 (95% CI: -12.58 to 5.62; I(2): 0%, P = 0.45), n = 2 RCTs] or fatigue [-0.57 (95% CI, -1.25 to 0.11; I(2) 34%, P = 0.100; n = 4 RCTs]. LIMITATIONS: This systematic review included a small number of studies and reduced number of participants in each study. Furthermore, most of the studies showed some biases and lack of methodological quality. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that there is low-quality evidence for the effectiveness of ES for pain relief in patients with FM. However, moderate-quality evidence for the effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA), combined or not combined with other types of treatment, was found for pain relief. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: PROSPERO under the identification CRD42015025323Key words: Electric stimulation, electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, pain, fibromyalgia, review, physical therapy, rehabilitation.  
  Address (up) 1Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Reabilitacao, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Bolsista de Desenvolvimento Tecnico e Industrial da Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Movement Analysis and Neurological Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil  
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  Notes PMID:28158150 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2222  
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Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2484  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2525  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2566  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2607  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2661  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2702  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2730  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2771  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2812  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2853  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address (up) 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2935  
Permanent link to this record
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