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Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2616  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2650  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2691  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2739  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2780  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2821  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2862  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2903  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, Q.; Yue, J.; Golianu, B.; Sun, Z.; Lu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic knee pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 392-403  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Arthralgia/*therapy; Humans; Osteoarthritis, Knee/*therapy; Pain Management; Pain Measurement; Research Design; Treatment Outcome; acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; electroacupuncture; pain management; pain research  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic knee pain (CKP). METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to June 2017. We included randomised controlled trials of acupuncture as the sole treatment or as an adjunctive treatment for CKP. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale and 11-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measurements included the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and adverse events. The quality of all included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) checklist. RESULTS: Nineteen trials were included in this systematic review. Of these, data from 17 studies were available for analysis. Regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or combined with other treatment, the results of the meta-analysis showed that acupuncture was associated with significantly reduced CKP at 12 weeks on WOMAC pain subscale (mean difference (MD) -1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.98 to -0.26, I(2)=62%, 3 trials, 608 participants) and VAS (MD -10.56, 95% CI -17.69 to -3.44, I(2)=0%, 2 trials, 145 patients). As for safety, no difference was found between the acupuncture and control groups (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.17, I(2)=29%). CONCLUSION: From this systematic review, we conclude that acupuncture may be effective at relieving CKP 12 weeks after acupuncture administration, based on the current evidence and our protocol. However, given the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of the included trials, we are currently unable to draw any strong conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. In addition, we found that acupuncture appears to have a satisfactory safety profile, although further studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm the safety of this technique. STRENGTHS: Systematic review without language restrictions. LIMITATIONS: Only a few high-quality and consistent trials could be included in this review.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29117967 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2944  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract We attempted to investigate cardioprotection of electroacupuncture (EA) for enhanced recovery after surgery on patients

undergoing heart valve replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass. Forty-four patients with acquired heart valve replacement were

randomly allocated to the EA group or the control group. Patients in the EA group received EA stimulus at bilateral Neiguan

(PC6), Ximen (PC4), Shenting (GV24), and Baihui (GV20) acupoints twenty minutes before anesthesia induction to the end of

surgery.The primary end point was cardioprotection effect of electroacupuncture postoperatively and the secondary endpoints were

quality of recovery and cognitive functioning postoperatively. The present study demonstrated that electroacupuncture reduced

the occurrence of complications and played a role of cardioprotective effect on patients after heart valve replacement surgery with

cardiopulmonary bypass, and it benefits patients more comfortable and contributes to recovery after surgery.
 
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2227  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract Copyright of Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is the property of Hindawi Publishing Corporation and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2248  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yue, J.; Liu, M.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.; Hung, E.-S.; Tong, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Golianu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of hiccups following stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 2-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Hiccup/etiology/*therapy; Humans; Stroke/*complications; Treatment Outcome; *Acupuncture; *Stroke; *Systematic Reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for hiccups following stroke. METHODS: Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and four Chinese medical databases were searched from their inception to 1 June 2015. The dataset included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared acupuncture as an adjunct to medical treatment (effectiveness) or acupuncture versus medical treatment (comparative effectiveness) in stroke patients with hiccups. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. RESULTS: Out of 436 potentially relevant studies, five met the inclusion criteria. When acupuncture was compared with other interventions (as sole or adjunctive treatment), meta-analysis revealed a significant difference in favour of cessation of hiccups within a specified time period (CHWST) following intervention when used as an adjunct (risk ratio (RR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.19, I2=0%), but not when used alone (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.47, I2=65%, ie, high heterogeneity). No safety information was reported in these studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for patients suffering from hiccups following stroke when used as an adjunct to medical treatment. However, due to the limited number of RCTs and poor methodology quality, we cannot reach a definitive conclusion, hence further large, rigorously designed trials are needed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27286862 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2436  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2477  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2518  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2559  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2669  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2710  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2723  
Permanent link to this record
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