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  Records Links
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2503  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2544  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2585  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2626  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2664  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2705  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2749  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2790  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2831  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2872  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2913  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Criado, M.B.; Santos, M.J.; Machado, J.; Goncalves, A.M.; Greten, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 852-857  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*physiopathology/*therapy; acupuncture; gait dysfunction; multiple sclerosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. DESIGN: We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. RESULTS: The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. CONCLUSIONS: Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.  
  Address 4 Heidelberg School of Chinese Medicine , Heidelberg, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28410453 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2954  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Deng, H.; Adams, C.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese medicine for schizophrenia: A survey of randomized trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists Abbreviated Journal Asia Pac Psychiatry  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Schizophrenia  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To survey the reports of randomized trials of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) interventions for schizophrenia and produce a broad overview of this type of research activity in this area. METHOD: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's comprehensive Trials Register (January 2016), selected all relevant randomized trials, and extracted the data within each study. Finally, we sought relevant reviews on the Cochrane Library. RESULTS: We initially screened 423 articles from which we identified 378 relevant studies randomizing 35 341 participants (average study size 94, SD 60). There were 7 herbs used as single medicine, 4 compositions or extractions, more than 144 herbal mixes, and 7 TCM principles reported for schizophrenia. Nonpharmacological interventions of TCM included acupuncture and exercise. The most commonly evaluated treatments are Ginkgo biloba, acupuncture, Wendan decoction, and Shugan Jieyu Capsule. There are 3 directly relevant Cochrane reviews. CONCLUSIONS: Most treatment approaches-and some in common use-have only one or two relevant small trials. Some coordination of effort would help ensure that further well-designed appropriately sized randomized trials are conducted. Systematic reviews should be performed in this field but with titles that take into account the complexity of TCM.  
  Address Cochrane Schizophrenia Group, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Schizophrenia
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27734592 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2186  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Derksen, T.M.E.; Bours, M.J.L.; Mols, F.; Weijenberg, M.P. url  openurl
  Title Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords ALTERNATIVE medicine; ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; COLON tumors; DIETARY supplements; Exercise; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; PERIPHERAL neuropathy; ONLINE information services; QUALITY of life; RECTUM -- Tumors; HEALTH self-care; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Oxaliplatin; Lifestyles  
  Abstract Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121885369; Source Information: 3/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; Subject Term: COLON tumors; Subject Term: DIETARY supplements; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: PERIPHERAL neuropathy; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RECTUM -- Tumors; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: OXALIPLATIN; Subject Term: LIFESTYLES; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 14p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2283  
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Author (up) Dimitrova, A.; Murchison, C.; Oken, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 164-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Neuropathy; Neuropathic Pain; Polyneuropathy; Mononeuropathy  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Neuropathy and its associated pain pose great therapeutic challenges. While there has been a recent surge in acupuncture use and research, little remains known about its effects on nerve function. This review aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of neuropathy of various etiologies. METHODS: The Medline, AMED, Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL, and clintrials.gov databases were systematically searched from inception to July 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing acupuncture's efficacy for poly- and mononeuropathy were reviewed. Parallel and crossover RCTs focused on acupuncture's efficacy were reviewed and screened for eligibility. The Scale for Assessing Scientific Quality of Investigations in Complementary and Alternative Medicine was used to assess RCT quality. RCTs with score of >9 and active control treatments such as sham acupuncture or medical therapy were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies were included: 13 original RCTs, a long-term follow-up, and a re-analysis of a prior RCT. The selected RCTs studied acupuncture for neuropathy caused by diabetes, Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and idiopathic conditions. Acupuncture regimens, control conditions, and outcome measures differed among studies, and various methodological issues were identified. Still, the majority of RCTs showed benefit for acupuncture over control in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, Bell's palsy, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Acupuncture is probably effective in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathy, and there is insufficient evidence for its benefits in idiopathic neuropathy. Acupuncture appears to improve nerve conduction study parameters in both sensory and motor nerves. Meta-analyses were conducted on all diabetic neuropathy and Bell's palsy individual subject data (six RCTs; a total of 680 subjects) using a summary estimate random effects model, which showed combined odds ratio of 4.23 (95% confidence interval 2.3-7.8; p < 0.001) favoring acupuncture over control for neuropathic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is beneficial in some peripheral neuropathies, but more rigorously designed studies using sham-acupuncture control are needed to characterize its effect and optimal use better.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, OR  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2209  
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Author (up) Dong, B.; Chen, Z.; Yin, X.; Li, D.; Ma, J.; Yin, P.; Cao, Y.; Lao, L.; Xu, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Efficacy of Acupuncture for Treating Depression-Related Insomnia Compared with a Control Group: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BioMed Research International Abbreviated Journal Biomed Res Int  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 9614810  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Sleep Disorders; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder; Insomnia; Depression  
  Abstract Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as monotherapy and as an alternative therapy in treating depression-related insomnia. Data Source. Seven databases were searched starting from 1946 to March 30, 2016. Study Eligibility Criteria. Randomized-controlled trials of adult subjects (18-75 y) who had depression-related insomnia and had received acupuncture. Results. 18 randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were introduced in this meta-analysis. The findings determined that the acupuncture treatment made significant improvements in PSQI score (MD = -2.37, 95% CI -3.52 to -1.21) compared with Western medicine. Acupuncture combined with Western medicine had a better effect on improving sleep quality (MD = -2.63, 95% CI -4.40 to -0.86) compared with the treatment of Western medicine alone. There was no statistical difference (MD = -2.76, 95% CI -7.65 to 2.12) between acupuncture treatment and Western medicine towards improving the HAMD score. Acupuncture combined with Western medicine (MD = -5.46, CI -8.55 to -2.38) had more effect on improving depression degree compared with the Western medicine alone. Conclusion. This systematic review indicates that acupuncture could be an alternative therapy to medication for treating depression-related insomnia.  
  Address Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Shanghai, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai 200071, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorder
  Disease Category Sleep Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28286776; PMCID:PMC5329663 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2187  
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Author (up) Ee, C.; French, S.D.; Xue, C.C.; Pirotta, M.; Teede, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes: clinical evidence update and its relevance to decision making Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Menopause (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Menopause  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes. This article synthesizes the best available evidence for when women are considering whether acupuncture might be useful for menopausal hot flashes. METHODS: We searched electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. RESULTS: The overall evidence demonstrates that acupuncture is effective when compared with no treatment, but not efficacious compared with sham. Methodological challenges such as the complex nature of acupuncture treatment, the physiological effects from sham, and the significant efficacy of placebo therapy generally in treating hot flashes all impact on these considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture improves menopausal hot flashes compared with no treatment; however, not compared with sham acupuncture. This is also consistent with the evidence that a range of placebo interventions improve menopausal symptoms. As clinicians play a vital role in assisting evidence-informed decisions, we need to ensure women understand the evidence and can integrate it with personal preferences. Some women may choose acupuncture for hot flashes, a potentially disabling condition without long-term adverse health consequences. Yet, women should do so understanding the evidence, and its strengths and weaknesses, around both effective medical therapies and acupuncture. Likewise, cost to the individual and the health system needs to be considered in the context of value-based health care.  
  Address 1National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia 2Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 3School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada 4School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Australia 5Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28350757 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2218  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2441  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2482  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2523  
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