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Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2699  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2768  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2809  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2850  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2891  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Han, S.-Y.; Hong, Z.-Y.; Xie, Y.-H.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicines for post stroke recovery: A traditional and network meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 49 Pages (down) e8830  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Network Meta-Analysis; Phytotherapy/*methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Stroke/*drug therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke is a condition with high morbidity and mortality, and 75% of stroke survivors lose their ability to work. Stroke is a burden to the family and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese herbal patent medicines in the treatment of patients after the acute phase of a stroke. METHODS: We searched the following databases through August 2016: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI), China Science Periodical Database (CSPD), and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) for studies that evaluated Chinese herbal patent medicines for post stroke recovery. A random-effect model was used to pool therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal patent medicines on stroke recovery. Network meta-analysis was used to rank the treatment for each Chinese herbal patent medicine. RESULTS: In our meta-analysis, we evaluated 28 trials that included 2780 patients. Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective in promoting recovery after stroke (OR, 3.03; 95% CI: 2.53-3.64; P < .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved neurological function defect scores when compared with the controls (standard mean difference [SMD], -0.89; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.35; P = .001). Chinese herbal patent medicines significantly improved the Barthel index (SMD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94; P < .001) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (SMD, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P < .001). In the network analysis, MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong were most likely to improve stroke recovery in patients without acupuncture. Additionally, Mailuoning, Xuesaitong, BuchangNaoxintong were the patented Chinese herbal medicines most likely to improve stroke recovery when combined with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: Our research suggests that the Chinese herbal patent medicines were effective for stroke recovery. The most effective treatments for stroke recovery were MLC601, Shuxuetong, and BuchangNaoxintong. However, to clarify the specific effective ingredients of Chinese herbal medicines, a well-designed study is warranted.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Shanghai Fengxian District Chinese Medicine Hospital, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29245245; PMCID:PMC5728860 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2932  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, J.-Y.; Zhang, C.; Xu, Y.-P.; Yu, Y.-Y.; Peng, L.; Leng, W.-D.; Niu, Y.-M.; Deng, M.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture therapy in the management of the clinical outcomes for temporomandibular disorders: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 9 Pages (down) e6064  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Humans; Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Visual Analog Scale  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate conventional acupuncture therapy in the management of clinical outcomes for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in adults. METHODS: The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Clinical Trails.gov were searched for reports published until March 31, 2016. RESULTS: Nine eligible studies from 8 publications involving 231 patients were included in the meta-analysis. A comparison of the main outcome of visual analog scale (VAS) values of pain between the acupuncture group and control group showed a significant decrease (MD = -0.98, 95% CI [-1.62, -0.34], I=54%, P = 0.003) in the VAS following acupuncture treatment. However, subgroup analysis according to the type of sham control group indicated that there were significant differences in the results when sham acupuncture was used as the control group (MD = -1.54, 95% CI [-2.63, -0.45], I=58%, P = 0.006) as well as when sham laser treatment was used as the control group (MD = -1.29, 95% CI [-2.32, -0.27], I = 0%, P = 0.01). However, there was no significant difference when the splint treatment group was used as the control group (MD = -0.09, 95% CI [-0.69, 0.50], I = 0%, P = 0.76). Subgroup analyses of VAS for pain by the classification of diseases indicated that the myogenous TMD subgroup demonstrated a significant difference (MD = -1.49, 95% CI [-2.45, -0.53], I = 47%, P = 0.002), and TMD showed no statistically significant difference (MD = -0.42, 95% CI [-1.14, 0.30], I = 46%, P = 0.25). Subgroup analysis according to whether the subgroup penetrated the skin showed that nonpenetrating sham acupuncture as the control group showed a significant difference (MD = -1.56, 95% CI [-2.70, -0.41], I = 58%, P = 0.008) compared with the conventional acupuncture as the treatment modality, while penetrating sham acupuncture as the control group showed no significant difference (MD = -1.29, 95% CI [-3.40, 0.82], I = not applicable, P = 0.23). No publication bias was observed considering the symmetry of the funnel plots. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that conventional acupuncture therapy is effective in reducing the degree of pain in patients with TMD, especially those with myofascial pain symptoms.  
  Address aCenter for Evidence-Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Taihe Hospital bSchool of Stomatology cDepartment of Stomatology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan dThe State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, No. 237, Luoyu Road, Wuhan, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28248862; PMCID:PMC5340435 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, S.-H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on Parkinson disease: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages (down) e5836  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most-common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease. The long-term use of levodopa leads to a loss of efficacy and to complications. Therefore, many patients with PD have turned to complementary therapies to help relieve their symptoms. Acupuncture is most commonly used as a complementary therapy in patients with PD. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acupuncture for patients with PD. This study was performed to summarize and evaluate evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in the relief of PD symptoms. METHODS: Seven databases, namely, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], and three Korean medical databases, were searched from their inception through August 2015 without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they contained reports of acupuncture compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone or acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for PD symptoms. Assessments were performed with the unified PD rating scales (UPDRS) I, II, III, and IV and the total score, the Webster scale, and effectiveness rating. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB). RESULTS: In all, 982 potentially relevant articles were identified; 25 RCTs met our inclusion criterion, 19 of 25 RCTs were high-quality studies (i.e., a score of 6 or higher). The included RCTs showed favorable results for acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in the UPDRS II, III, and IV and the total score. Acupuncture was effective in relieving PD symptoms compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone, and acupuncture plus conventional treatment had a more significant effect than conventional treatment alone. CONCLUSIONS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the use of acupuncture for relief of PD symptoms and found that acupuncture has significant positive effects. Acupuncture can be considered as a combination treatment with conventional treatment for patients with PD. Further studies on this topic should be carried out according to rigorous methodological designs in both the East and the West.  
  Address aDepartment of Applied Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University bResearch Group of Pain and Neuroscience, WHO Collaborating Center for Traditional Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute cDepartment of Meridian and Acupoint, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28099340; PMCID:PMC5279085 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2217  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2457  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2498  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2621  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2660  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2744  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2785  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2826  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cheng, C.-S.; Chen, L.-Y.; Ning, Z.-Y.; Zhang, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Xie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Abbreviated Journal Support Care Cancer  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3807-3814  
  Keywords Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/etiology/*therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/*physiopathology/*therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Staging; Physical Therapy Modalities; Pilot Projects; Quality of Life; *Acupuncture; *Cancer-related fatigue; *Lung cancer; *Quality of life  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial. RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 270 Dong'An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. isable624@163.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28707168 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2867  
Permanent link to this record
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