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Author Perez-Palomares, S.; Olivan-Blazquez, B.; Perez-Palomares, A.; Gaspar-Calvo, E.; Perez-Benito, M.; Lopez-Lapena, E.; de la Torre-Beldarrain, M.L.; Magallon-Botaya, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contribution of Dry Needling to Individualized Physical Therapy Treatment of Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 47 Issue (up) 1 Pages 11-20  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Shoulder Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acu Versus Usual Care; Dry Needling, With Acupuncture Needle; Myofascial Trigger Points; MTrPs; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract Study Design Multicenter, parallel randomized clinical trial. Background Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are implicated in shoulder pain and functional limitations. An intervention intended to treat MTrPs is dry needling. Objectives To investigate the effectiveness of dry needling in addition to evidence-based personalized physical therapy treatment in the treatment of shoulder pain. Methods One hundred twenty patients with nonspecific shoulder pain were randomly allocated into 2 parallel groups: (1) personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment; and (2) trigger point dry needling in addition to personalized, evidence-based physical therapy treatment. Patients were assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was pain assessed by a visual analog scale at 3 months, and secondary variables were joint range-of-motion limitations, Constant-Murley score for pain and function, and number of active MTrPs. Clinical efficacy was assessed using intention-to-treat analysis. Results Of the 120 enrolled patients, 63 were randomly assigned to the control group and 57 to the intervention group. There were no significant differences in outcome between the 2 treatment groups. Both groups showed improvement over time. Conclusion Dry needling did not offer benefits in addition to personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment for patients with nonspecific shoulder pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered February 11, 2009 at www.isrctn.com (ISRCTN30907460). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):11-20. Epub 9 Dec 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6698.  
  Address Dr. Barbara Olivan-Blazquez, Department of Psychology and Sociology, University of Zaragoza, Violante de Hungria 23, 50-009 Zaragoza, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27937046 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2213  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Torkzahrani, S.; Mahmoudikohani, F.; Saatchi, K.; Sefidkar, R.; Banaei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives Abbreviated Journal Women Birth  
  Volume 30 Issue (up) 1 Pages 46-50  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Adult; Female; Humans; Labor, Induced/*methods; Labor, Obstetric; *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Uterine Contraction/*physiology; *Acupressure; *Initiation of labor; *Labor; *Sham acupressure; *Term pregnancy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Induction of labor is a common obstetric procedure. Acupressure is a natural method that is used for inducing uterine contractions. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the impact of acupressure on the induction of labor. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, 162 nulliparous pregnant women were admitted to the hospital. They were categorized into 3 groups; acupressure, sham acupressure and control. Acupressure points SP6, BL 60 and BL 32 were pressured bilaterally. The intervention was done by the researcher every other day between 9 am and 11 am. The intervention was carried out on women in the afternoon and the following day. Subjects were examined to determine the initiation of labor symptoms48 and 96h after the start of intervention and at the time of hospitalization. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests (p<0.05). RESULTS: There was no significant difference among the groups for spontaneous initiation of labor within 48h (P=0.464), and 49-96h after beginning the intervention (P=0.111) and 97h after beginning the intervention to the time of hospitalization for the spontaneous initiation of labor (P=0.897). There were no significant differences in the secondary outcomes between the groups. CONCLUSION: According to the finding of this study, it seems that acupressure treatment was not effective in initiating labor as compared with the sham acupressure and the routine care groups.  
  Address Student Research Committee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27444642 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2226  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nakamura, S.; Horiuchi, S. url  openurl
  Title Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Effectiveness of a Self-Care Program for Pregnant Women for Relieving Hiesho Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue (up) 1 Pages 53-59  
  Keywords ARM -- Physiology; EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; LEG -- Physiology; PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ANALYSIS of variance; BODY temperature; CHI-squared test; CLINICAL trials; CLOTHING & dress; CONFIDENCE intervals; EXERCISE therapy; MEDICAL thermography; PROBABILITY theory; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SCALE analysis (Psychology); HEALTH self-care; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; STATISTICAL power analysis; STATISTICAL significance; SKIN temperature; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; RELATIVE risk (Medicine); PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Pregnancy; Japan  
  Abstract Background A group of adults can be identified with chronic non-responding anxiety symptoms who have repeatedly accessed treatments through their GP, such as cognitive behaviour therapy, bibliotherapy and medication, but with no effect. These patients make heavy use of health service resources with no beneficial outcome. This study aims to test the effect of an acupuncture formula of three specific acupuncture points, suggested in a previous pilot study. Method 40 participants from a psychiatry waiting list were randomised into one of two groups: group 1 (n=25) received 10 weeks of acupuncture at PC6, HT7 and LR3, and group 2 was a waiting list control group. The waiting list group (n=15) then received acupuncture. Both groups were followed up for 10 weeks after treatment. The outcome measure was the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results 36 patients completed the study, with two dropouts in each group. State anxiety scores in the acupuncture group decreased from 57.7 (SD 13.1) to 38.8 (12.0); scores in the waiting list control group decreased from 61.5 (11.6) to 60.6 (11.7). The difference was highly significant (p<0.0001). Similar changes were seen for trait anxiety scores. The control group showed similar statistically significant improvements when they received acupuncture. The improvements were maintained after 10 weeks of follow-up in each group. Conclusions Acupuncture is a promising intervention for patients with chronic anxiety symptoms that have proven resistant to other forms of treatment.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 120746245; Source Information: Jan2017, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p53; Subject Term: ARM -- Physiology; Subject Term: EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; Subject Term: LEG -- Physiology; Subject Term: PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: BODY temperature; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: CLOTHING & dress; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: EXERCISE therapy; Subject Term: MEDICAL thermography; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: STATISTICAL power analysis; Subject Term: STATISTICAL significance; Subject Term: SKIN temperature; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: RELATIVE risk (Medicine); Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: PREGNANCY; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: JAPAN; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2288  
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Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Dahlen, H.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture or acupressure for induction of labour Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) 10 Pages 1-126  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Labor, Induced; Women's Health; Labor Induction; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Acupressure  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This is one of a series of reviews of methods of cervical ripening and labour induction. The use of complementary therapies is increasing. Women may look to complementary therapies during pregnancy and childbirth to be used alongside conventional medical practice. Acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points of the body. Acupressure is using the thumbs or fingers to apply pressure to specific points. The limited observational studies to date suggest acupuncture for induction of labour has no known adverse effects to the fetus, and may be effective. However, the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness of this technique is limited. OBJECTIVES: To determine, from the best available evidence, the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture and acupressure for third trimester cervical ripening or induction of labour. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2016), PubMed (1966 to 25 November 2016), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (25 November 2016), CINAHL (25 November 2016), Embase (25 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Portal (ICTRP) (3 October 2016), and bibliographies of relevant papers. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture or acupressure, used for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction, with placebo/no treatment or other methods on a predefined list of labour induction methods. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data, and checked them for accuracy. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes 22 trials, reporting on 3456 women. The trials using manual or electro-acupuncture were compared with usual care (eight trials, 760 women), sweeping of membranes (one trial, 207 women), or sham controls (seven trials, 729 women). Trials using acupressure were compared with usual care (two trials, 151 women) or sham controls (two trials, 239 women). Many studies had a moderate risk of bias.Overall, few trials reported on primary outcomes. No trial reported vaginal delivery not achieved within 24 hours and uterine hyperstimulation with fetal heart rate (FHR) changes. Serious maternal and neonatal death or morbidity were only reported under acupuncture versus sham control. Acupuncture versus sham control There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 1.15, eight trials, 789 women; high-quality evidence). There were no reports of maternal death or perinatal death in the one trial that reported this outcome. There was evidence of a benefit from acupuncture in improving cervical readiness for labour (mean difference (MD) 0.40, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.69, one trial, 125 women), as measured by cervical maturity within 24 hours using Bishop's score. There was no evidence of a difference between groups for oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, Apgar score < 7 at five minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL, time from the trial to time of birth, use of induction methods, length of labour, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupuncture versus usual care There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.17, eight trials, 760 women; low-quality evidence). There was an increase in cervical maturation for the acupuncture (electro) group compared with control (MD 1.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 2.49, one trial, 67 women) and a shorter length of labour (minutes) in the usual care group compared to electro-acupuncture (MD 124.00, 95% CI 37.39 to 210.61, one trial, 67 women).There appeared be a differential effect according to type of acupuncture based on subgroup analysis. Electro-acupuncture appeared to have more of an effect than manual acupuncture for the outcomes caesarean section (CS), and instrumental vaginal and spontaneous vaginal birth. It decreased the rate of CS (average RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.80, 3 trials, 327 women), increased the rate of instrumental vaginal birth (average RR 2.30, 95%CI 1.15 to 4.60, two trials, 271 women), and increased the rate of spontaneous vaginal birth (average RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.56, one trial, 72 women). However, subgroup analyses are observational in nature and so results should be interpreted with caution.There were no clear differences between groups for other outcomes: oxytocin augmentation, use of epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, perineal tear, fetal infection, maternal satisfaction, use of other induction methods, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupuncture versus sweeping if fetal membranes One trial of acupuncture versus sweeping of fetal membranes showed no clear differences between groups in caesarean sections (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.22, one trial, 207 women, moderate-quality evidence), need for augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupressure versus sham control There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to control (RR, 0.94, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.30, two trials, 239 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced oxytocin augmentation, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupressure versus usual care There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to usual care (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.53, two trials, 151 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, admission to neonatal intensive care, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, use of other induction methods, and spontaneous vaginal birth. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there was no clear benefit from acupuncture or acupressure in reducing caesarean section rate. The quality of the evidence varied between low to high. Few trials reported on neonatal morbidity or maternal mortality outcomes. Acupuncture showed some benefit in improving cervical maturity, however, more well-designed trials are needed. Future trials could include clinically relevant safety outcomes.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM),Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Sydney, New South Wales, 2751, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Labor, Induced
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29036756 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2446  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2487  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2528  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2569  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2610  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2666  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2707  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2733  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2774  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2815  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2856  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2897  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Zhao, Y.; Bu, H.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupuncture for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 10 Pages e0186616  
  Keywords *Acupuncture; Endometriosis/*complications; Female; Humans; Pain Management/*methods; Pain Measurement; Publication Bias  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain. Our aim in the present study was to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for endometriosis-related pain. METHODS: In December 2016, six databases were searched for randomised controlled trials that determined the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Ultimately, 10 studies involving 589 patients were included. The main outcomes assessed were variation in pain level, variation in peripheral blood CA-125 level, and clinical effective rate. All analyses were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis statistical software. RESULTS: Of the 10 studies included, only one pilot study used a placebo control and assessed blinding; the rest used various controls (medications and herbs), which were impossible to blind. The sample sizes were small in all studies, ranging from 8 to 36 patients per arm. The mean difference (MD) in pain reduction (pre- minus post-interventional pain level-measured on a 0-10-point scale) between the acupuncture and control groups was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.01-1.72, P<0.0001). Acupuncture had a positive effect on peripheral blood CA-125 levels, as compared with the control groups (MD = 5.9, 95% CI = 1.56-10.25, P = 0.008). Similarly, the effect of acupuncture on clinical effective rate was positive, as compared with the control groups (odds ratio = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.24-3.44, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few randomised, blinded clinical trials have addressed the efficacy of acupuncture in treating endometriosis-related pain. Nonetheless, the current literature suggests that acupuncture reduces pain and serum CA-125 levels, regardless of the control intervention used. To confirm these findings, additional, blinded studies with proper controls and adequate sample sizes are needed.  
  Address Laboratory of Anatomy, School of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29077705; PMCID:PMC5659600 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2938  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cohen, M.M.; Smit, D.V.; Andrianopoulos, N.; Ben-Meir, M.; Taylor, D.M.D.; Parker, S.J.; Xue, C.C.; Cameron, P.A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication The Medical Journal of Australia Abbreviated Journal Med J Aust  
  Volume 206 Issue (up) 11 Pages 494-499  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Analgesia/*methods; Ankle Injuries/therapy; Emergency Medical Services/*methods; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Migraine Disorders/therapy; Pain Measurement; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. DESIGN: A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. RESULTS: 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.  
  Address The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28918732 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, X.; Liu, Y.; Liu, B.; He, L.; Liu, Z.; Yan, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors related to acupuncture response in patients with chronic severe functional constipation: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) 11 Pages e0187723  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Constipation/*physiopathology/*therapy; Demography; Electroacupuncture; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been demonstrated to be effective and safe for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). However, which patients with CSFC will have a better response to acupuncture remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To explore factors related to acupuncture response in patients with CSFC. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a previous multicenter randomized controlled trial consisting of a 2-week run-in period, 8-week treatment, and 12-week follow-up without treatment in which patients with CSFC were randomly allocated to an electroacupuncture group or a sham electroacupuncture group. Responders were defined as participants with an increase of at least one complete spontaneous bowel movement (CSBM) in week 20 compared with the baseline period. The CSBM responder rate in both groups was described, and the baseline characteristics of participants potentially related to acupuncture response were mainly analyzed using logistic regression analysis with bootstrapping techniques. RESULTS: A total of 1021 participants were analyzed in this study, of whom 516 (50.5%) were classified as responders. The CSBM responder rate in week 20 was significantly greater in the electroacupuncture group than in the sham electroacupuncture group (62.9% vs. 37.9%, respectively; P<0.001). Both age and comorbidity were negatively associated with clinical response: with every one-year increase in age, the likelihood of clinical response was reduced by 1.2% (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.980 to 0.996; P = 0.005), and patients with comorbidities were approximately 42% less likely to respond to treatment (OR 0.581, 95%CI 0.248 to 0.914; P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: CSFC patients with increasing age and comorbidity may be less likely to respond to acupuncture. These findings contribute to guiding clinical practice in terms of pretreatment patient selection. Further research is needed to confirm the association.  
  Address Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29166673; PMCID:PMC5699843 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2448  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chavez, L.M.; Huang, S.-S.; MacDonald, I.; Lin, J.-G.; Lee, Y.-C.; Chen, Y.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation: A Literature Review of Basic Studies Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 18 Issue (up) 11 Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; basic research; cerebral ischemia; rehabilitation; stroke  
  Abstract Acupuncture is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an alternative and complementary strategy for stroke treatment and for improving stroke care. Clinical trial and meta-analysis findings have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture in improving balance function, reducing spasticity, and increasing muscle strength and general well-being post-stroke. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review, summarize the current known mechanisms in ischemic stroke rehabilitation through acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) therapy, and to detail the frequently used acupoints implicated in these effects. The evidence in this review indicates that five major different mechanisms are involved in the beneficial effects of acupuncture/EA on ischemic stroke rehabilitation: (1) Promotion of neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the central nervous system (CNS); (2) Regulation of cerebral blood flow in the ischemic area; (3) Anti-apoptosis in the ischemic area; (4) Regulation of neurochemicals; and, (5) Improvement of impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory after stroke. The most frequently used acupoints in basic studies include Baihui (GV20), Zusanli (ST36), Quchi (LI11), Shuigou (GV26), Dazhui (GV14), and Hegu (LI4). Our findings show that acupuncture exerts a beneficial effect on ischemic stroke through modulation of different mechanisms originating in the CNS.  
  Address Department of Photonics and Communication Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan. yihungchen@mail.cmu.edu.tw  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29143805; PMCID:PMC5713240 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2449  
Permanent link to this record
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