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Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2512  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2518  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ju, Z.Y.; Wang, K.; Cui, H.S.; Yao, Y.; Liu, S.M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, T.Y.; Xia, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) Pages Cd012057  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Analgesics/therapeutic use; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use; Humans; Inositol/therapeutic use; Middle Aged; Neuralgia/*therapy; Nimodipine/therapeutic use; Pain Measurement; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Vitamin B 12/analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken. OBJECTIVES: To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate 'Summary of findings' tables. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies involving 462 participants with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain (442 completers (251 male), mean ages 52 to 63 years). The included studies recruited 403 participants from China and 59 from the UK. Most studies included a small sample size (fewer than 50 participants per treatment arm) and all studies were at high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. Most studies had unclear risk of bias for sequence generation (four out of six studies), allocation concealment (five out of six) and selective reporting (all included studies). All studies investigated manual acupuncture, and we did not identify any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study investigating other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).One study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. We are uncertain if there is any difference between the two interventions on reducing pain intensity (n = 45; MD -0.4, 95% CI -1.83 to 1.03, very low-quality evidence), and neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain' (visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10) average score was 5.8 and 6.2 respectively in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, where 0 = no pain). There was limited data on quality of life, which showed no clear difference between groups. Evidence was not available on pain relief, adverse events or other pre-defined secondary outcomes for this comparison.Three studies compared acupuncture alone versus other therapies (mecobalamin combined with nimodipine, and inositol). Acupuncture may reduce the risk of 'no clinical response' to pain than other therapies (n = 209; RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.51), however, evidence was not available for pain intensity, pain relief, adverse events or any of the other secondary outcomes.Two studies compared acupuncture combined with other active therapies (mecobalamin, and Xiaoke bitong capsule) versus other active therapies used alone. We found that the acupuncture combination group had a lower VAS score for pain intensity (n = 104; MD -1.02, 95% CI -1.09 to -0.95) and improved quality of life (n = 104; MD -2.19, 95% CI -2.39 to -1.99), than those receiving other therapy alone. However, the average VAS score of the acupuncture and control groups was 3.23 and 4.25 respectively, indicating neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain'. Furthermore, this evidence was from a single study with high risk of bias and a very small sample size. There was no evidence on pain relief and we identified no clear differences between groups on other parameters, including 'no clinical response' to pain and withdrawals. There was no evidence on adverse events.The overall quality of evidence is very low due to study limitations (high risk of performance, detection, and attrition bias, and high risk of bias confounded by small study size) or imprecision. We have limited confidence in the effect estimate and the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimated effect. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Due to the limited data available, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture for neuropathic pain in general, or for any specific neuropathic pain condition when compared with sham acupuncture or other active therapies. Five studies are still ongoing and seven studies are awaiting classification due to the unclear treatment duration, and the results of these studies may influence the current findings.  
  Address College of Acumox and Tuina, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29197180 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2524  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2525  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2536  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2553  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2559  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ju, Z.Y.; Wang, K.; Cui, H.S.; Yao, Y.; Liu, S.M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, T.Y.; Xia, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) Pages Cd012057  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Analgesics/therapeutic use; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use; Humans; Inositol/therapeutic use; Middle Aged; Neuralgia/*therapy; Nimodipine/therapeutic use; Pain Measurement; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Vitamin B 12/analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken. OBJECTIVES: To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate 'Summary of findings' tables. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies involving 462 participants with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain (442 completers (251 male), mean ages 52 to 63 years). The included studies recruited 403 participants from China and 59 from the UK. Most studies included a small sample size (fewer than 50 participants per treatment arm) and all studies were at high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. Most studies had unclear risk of bias for sequence generation (four out of six studies), allocation concealment (five out of six) and selective reporting (all included studies). All studies investigated manual acupuncture, and we did not identify any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study investigating other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).One study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. We are uncertain if there is any difference between the two interventions on reducing pain intensity (n = 45; MD -0.4, 95% CI -1.83 to 1.03, very low-quality evidence), and neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain' (visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10) average score was 5.8 and 6.2 respectively in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, where 0 = no pain). There was limited data on quality of life, which showed no clear difference between groups. Evidence was not available on pain relief, adverse events or other pre-defined secondary outcomes for this comparison.Three studies compared acupuncture alone versus other therapies (mecobalamin combined with nimodipine, and inositol). Acupuncture may reduce the risk of 'no clinical response' to pain than other therapies (n = 209; RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.51), however, evidence was not available for pain intensity, pain relief, adverse events or any of the other secondary outcomes.Two studies compared acupuncture combined with other active therapies (mecobalamin, and Xiaoke bitong capsule) versus other active therapies used alone. We found that the acupuncture combination group had a lower VAS score for pain intensity (n = 104; MD -1.02, 95% CI -1.09 to -0.95) and improved quality of life (n = 104; MD -2.19, 95% CI -2.39 to -1.99), than those receiving other therapy alone. However, the average VAS score of the acupuncture and control groups was 3.23 and 4.25 respectively, indicating neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain'. Furthermore, this evidence was from a single study with high risk of bias and a very small sample size. There was no evidence on pain relief and we identified no clear differences between groups on other parameters, including 'no clinical response' to pain and withdrawals. There was no evidence on adverse events.The overall quality of evidence is very low due to study limitations (high risk of performance, detection, and attrition bias, and high risk of bias confounded by small study size) or imprecision. We have limited confidence in the effect estimate and the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimated effect. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Due to the limited data available, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture for neuropathic pain in general, or for any specific neuropathic pain condition when compared with sham acupuncture or other active therapies. Five studies are still ongoing and seven studies are awaiting classification due to the unclear treatment duration, and the results of these studies may influence the current findings.  
  Address College of Acumox and Tuina, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29197180 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2565  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2566  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2577  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2594  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ju, Z.Y.; Wang, K.; Cui, H.S.; Yao, Y.; Liu, S.M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, T.Y.; Xia, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) Pages Cd012057  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Analgesics/therapeutic use; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use; Humans; Inositol/therapeutic use; Middle Aged; Neuralgia/*therapy; Nimodipine/therapeutic use; Pain Measurement; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Vitamin B 12/analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken. OBJECTIVES: To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate 'Summary of findings' tables. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies involving 462 participants with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain (442 completers (251 male), mean ages 52 to 63 years). The included studies recruited 403 participants from China and 59 from the UK. Most studies included a small sample size (fewer than 50 participants per treatment arm) and all studies were at high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. Most studies had unclear risk of bias for sequence generation (four out of six studies), allocation concealment (five out of six) and selective reporting (all included studies). All studies investigated manual acupuncture, and we did not identify any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study investigating other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).One study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. We are uncertain if there is any difference between the two interventions on reducing pain intensity (n = 45; MD -0.4, 95% CI -1.83 to 1.03, very low-quality evidence), and neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain' (visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10) average score was 5.8 and 6.2 respectively in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, where 0 = no pain). There was limited data on quality of life, which showed no clear difference between groups. Evidence was not available on pain relief, adverse events or other pre-defined secondary outcomes for this comparison.Three studies compared acupuncture alone versus other therapies (mecobalamin combined with nimodipine, and inositol). Acupuncture may reduce the risk of 'no clinical response' to pain than other therapies (n = 209; RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.51), however, evidence was not available for pain intensity, pain relief, adverse events or any of the other secondary outcomes.Two studies compared acupuncture combined with other active therapies (mecobalamin, and Xiaoke bitong capsule) versus other active therapies used alone. We found that the acupuncture combination group had a lower VAS score for pain intensity (n = 104; MD -1.02, 95% CI -1.09 to -0.95) and improved quality of life (n = 104; MD -2.19, 95% CI -2.39 to -1.99), than those receiving other therapy alone. However, the average VAS score of the acupuncture and control groups was 3.23 and 4.25 respectively, indicating neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain'. Furthermore, this evidence was from a single study with high risk of bias and a very small sample size. There was no evidence on pain relief and we identified no clear differences between groups on other parameters, including 'no clinical response' to pain and withdrawals. There was no evidence on adverse events.The overall quality of evidence is very low due to study limitations (high risk of performance, detection, and attrition bias, and high risk of bias confounded by small study size) or imprecision. We have limited confidence in the effect estimate and the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimated effect. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Due to the limited data available, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture for neuropathic pain in general, or for any specific neuropathic pain condition when compared with sham acupuncture or other active therapies. Five studies are still ongoing and seven studies are awaiting classification due to the unclear treatment duration, and the results of these studies may influence the current findings.  
  Address College of Acumox and Tuina, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29197180 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2606  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2607  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ju, Z.Y.; Wang, K.; Cui, H.S.; Yao, Y.; Liu, S.M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, T.Y.; Xia, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for neuropathic pain in adults Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 12 Issue (up) Pages Cd012057  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Analgesics/therapeutic use; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use; Humans; Inositol/therapeutic use; Middle Aged; Neuralgia/*therapy; Nimodipine/therapeutic use; Pain Measurement; Quality of Life; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Vitamin B 12/analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain may be caused by nerve damage, and is often followed by changes to the central nervous system. Uncertainty remains regarding the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture treatments for neuropathic pain, despite a number of clinical trials being undertaken. OBJECTIVES: To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of acupuncture treatments for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four Chinese databases, ClinicalTrials.gov and World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 14 February 2017. We also cross checked the reference lists of included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with treatment duration of eight weeks or longer comparing acupuncture (either given alone or in combination with other therapies) with sham acupuncture, other active therapies, or treatment as usual, for neuropathic pain in adults. We searched for studies of acupuncture based on needle insertion and stimulation of somatic tissues for therapeutic purposes, and we excluded other methods of stimulating acupuncture points without needle insertion. We searched for studies of manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture or other acupuncture techniques used in clinical practice (such as warm needling, fire needling, etc). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and pain relief. The secondary outcomes were any pain-related outcome indicating some improvement, withdrawals, participants experiencing any adverse event, serious adverse events and quality of life. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous outcomes we calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We also calculated number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) where possible. We combined all data using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE to generate 'Summary of findings' tables. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies involving 462 participants with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain (442 completers (251 male), mean ages 52 to 63 years). The included studies recruited 403 participants from China and 59 from the UK. Most studies included a small sample size (fewer than 50 participants per treatment arm) and all studies were at high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. Most studies had unclear risk of bias for sequence generation (four out of six studies), allocation concealment (five out of six) and selective reporting (all included studies). All studies investigated manual acupuncture, and we did not identify any study comparing acupuncture with treatment as usual, nor any study investigating other acupuncture techniques (such as electroacupuncture, warm needling, fire needling).One study compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture. We are uncertain if there is any difference between the two interventions on reducing pain intensity (n = 45; MD -0.4, 95% CI -1.83 to 1.03, very low-quality evidence), and neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain' (visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10) average score was 5.8 and 6.2 respectively in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, where 0 = no pain). There was limited data on quality of life, which showed no clear difference between groups. Evidence was not available on pain relief, adverse events or other pre-defined secondary outcomes for this comparison.Three studies compared acupuncture alone versus other therapies (mecobalamin combined with nimodipine, and inositol). Acupuncture may reduce the risk of 'no clinical response' to pain than other therapies (n = 209; RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.51), however, evidence was not available for pain intensity, pain relief, adverse events or any of the other secondary outcomes.Two studies compared acupuncture combined with other active therapies (mecobalamin, and Xiaoke bitong capsule) versus other active therapies used alone. We found that the acupuncture combination group had a lower VAS score for pain intensity (n = 104; MD -1.02, 95% CI -1.09 to -0.95) and improved quality of life (n = 104; MD -2.19, 95% CI -2.39 to -1.99), than those receiving other therapy alone. However, the average VAS score of the acupuncture and control groups was 3.23 and 4.25 respectively, indicating neither group achieved 'no worse than mild pain'. Furthermore, this evidence was from a single study with high risk of bias and a very small sample size. There was no evidence on pain relief and we identified no clear differences between groups on other parameters, including 'no clinical response' to pain and withdrawals. There was no evidence on adverse events.The overall quality of evidence is very low due to study limitations (high risk of performance, detection, and attrition bias, and high risk of bias confounded by small study size) or imprecision. We have limited confidence in the effect estimate and the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimated effect. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Due to the limited data available, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of acupuncture for neuropathic pain in general, or for any specific neuropathic pain condition when compared with sham acupuncture or other active therapies. Five studies are still ongoing and seven studies are awaiting classification due to the unclear treatment duration, and the results of these studies may influence the current findings.  
  Address College of Acumox and Tuina, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29197180 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2648  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bridgett, R.; Klose, P.; Duffield, R.; Mydock, S.; Lauche, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords complementary medicine; efficacy; pain; safety; traditional medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. METHODS: SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. RESULTS: Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. CONCLUSIONS: No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.  
  Address 4 Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29185802 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2661  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2663  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2668  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue (up) Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2669  
Permanent link to this record
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