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Author Yue, J.; Liu, M.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.; Hung, E.-S.; Tong, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Golianu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the treatment of hiccups following stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 2-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Hiccup/etiology/*therapy; Humans; Stroke/*complications; Treatment Outcome; *Acupuncture; *Stroke; *Systematic Reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for hiccups following stroke. METHODS: Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and four Chinese medical databases were searched from their inception to 1 June 2015. The dataset included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared acupuncture as an adjunct to medical treatment (effectiveness) or acupuncture versus medical treatment (comparative effectiveness) in stroke patients with hiccups. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. RESULTS: Out of 436 potentially relevant studies, five met the inclusion criteria. When acupuncture was compared with other interventions (as sole or adjunctive treatment), meta-analysis revealed a significant difference in favour of cessation of hiccups within a specified time period (CHWST) following intervention when used as an adjunct (risk ratio (RR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.19, I2=0%), but not when used alone (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.47, I2=65%, ie, high heterogeneity). No safety information was reported in these studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for patients suffering from hiccups following stroke when used as an adjunct to medical treatment. However, due to the limited number of RCTs and poor methodology quality, we cannot reach a definitive conclusion, hence further large, rigorously designed trials are needed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27286862 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Torkzahrani, S.; Mahmoudikohani, F.; Saatchi, K.; Sefidkar, R.; Banaei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor: A randomized controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Women and Birth : Journal of the Australian College of Midwives Abbreviated Journal Women Birth  
  Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 46-50  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Adult; Female; Humans; Labor, Induced/*methods; Labor, Obstetric; *Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Uterine Contraction/*physiology; *Acupressure; *Initiation of labor; *Labor; *Sham acupressure; *Term pregnancy  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Induction of labor is a common obstetric procedure. Acupressure is a natural method that is used for inducing uterine contractions. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the impact of acupressure on the induction of labor. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on the initiation of labor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, 162 nulliparous pregnant women were admitted to the hospital. They were categorized into 3 groups; acupressure, sham acupressure and control. Acupressure points SP6, BL 60 and BL 32 were pressured bilaterally. The intervention was done by the researcher every other day between 9 am and 11 am. The intervention was carried out on women in the afternoon and the following day. Subjects were examined to determine the initiation of labor symptoms48 and 96h after the start of intervention and at the time of hospitalization. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests (p<0.05). RESULTS: There was no significant difference among the groups for spontaneous initiation of labor within 48h (P=0.464), and 49-96h after beginning the intervention (P=0.111) and 97h after beginning the intervention to the time of hospitalization for the spontaneous initiation of labor (P=0.897). There were no significant differences in the secondary outcomes between the groups. CONCLUSION: According to the finding of this study, it seems that acupressure treatment was not effective in initiating labor as compared with the sham acupressure and the routine care groups.  
  Address Student Research Committee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27444642 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2226  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yeung, W.-F.; Chung, K.-F.; Yu, Y.-M.B.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What predicts a positive response to acupuncture? A secondary analysis of three randomised controlled trials of insomnia Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 24-29  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Educational Status; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*therapy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; *Sleep Medicine; *Statistics & Research Methods  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Few studies have investigated the predictors of the specific and non-specific effects of acupuncture. The aim of this secondary analysis was to determine patient characteristics that may predict a better treatment response to acupuncture for insomnia. METHODS: We pooled the data of three randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of acupuncture for insomnia to examine sociodemographic variables, clinical characteristics, baseline sleep-wake variables, and treatment expectancy in relation to acupuncture response. Subjects with an improvement in insomnia severity index (ISI) scores of >/=8 points from baseline to 1 week post-treatment were classified as responders. Factors were compared between responders and non-responders, and also by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 116 subjects who received traditional needle acupuncture were included, of which 37 (31.9%) were classified as responders. Acupuncture responders had a higher educational level (p<0.01) and higher baseline ISI score (p<0.05), compared to non-responders. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the number of years spent in full-time education remained significant as a predictor of treatment response (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.38, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with previous studies, our data suggest that the response to acupuncture is difficult to predict. Although the predictive power of educational level is weak overall, our findings provide potentially valuable information that could be built upon in further research (including a larger sample size), and may help to inform patient selection for the treatment of chronic insomnia with acupuncture in the future. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov: #NCT00839592; Results, #NCT00838994; Results, and #NCT01707706; Results.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27503746 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2170  
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Author Thiagarajah, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How effective is acupuncture for reducing pain due to plantar fasciitis? Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Singapore Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Singapore Med J  
  Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 92-97  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Foot Diseases; Fasciitis, Plantar; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. METHODS: Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected. The Delphi list was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies retrieved. RESULTS: Three studies that compared acupuncture with standard treatment and one study on real versus sham acupuncture were found. These showed that acupuncture significantly reduced pain levels in patients with plantar fasciitis, as measured on the visual analogue scale and the Plantar Fasciitis Pain/Disability Scale. These benefits were noted between four and eight weeks of treatment, with no further significant reduction in pain beyond this duration. Side effects were found to be minimal. CONCLUSION: Although acupuncture may reduce plantar fasciitis pain in the short term, there is insufficient evidence for a definitive conclusion regarding its effectiveness in the longer term. Further research is required to strengthen the acceptance of acupuncture among healthcare providers.  
  Address Queenstown Polyclinic, SingHealth Polyclinics, Singapore  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fasciitis, Plantar
  Disease Category Foot Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27526703; PMCID:PMC5311890 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2224  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andronis, L.; Kinghorn, P.; Qiao, S.; Whitehurst, D.G.T.; Durrell, S.; McLeod, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain: a Systematic Literature Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Applied Health Economics and Health Policy Abbreviated Journal Appl Health Econ Health Policy  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 173-201  
  Keywords Cost-Benefit Analysis; Exercise Therapy/economics; Health Care Costs; Humans; Low Back Pain/*economics/therapy; Patient Education as Topic/economics; Physical Therapy Modalities/economics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem, having a substantial effect on peoples' quality of life and placing a significant economic burden on healthcare systems and, more broadly, societies. Many interventions to alleviate LBP are available but their cost effectiveness is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To identify, document and appraise studies reporting on the cost effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment options for LBP. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database), 'similar article' searches and reference list scanning. Study selection was carried out by three assessors, independently. Study quality was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist. Data were extracted using customized extraction forms. RESULTS: Thirty-three studies were identified. Study interventions were categorised as: (1) combined physical exercise and psychological therapy, (2) physical exercise therapy only, (3) information and education, and (4) manual therapy. Interventions assessed within each category varied in terms of their components and delivery. In general, combined physical and psychological treatments, information and education interventions, and manual therapies appeared to be cost effective when compared with the study-specific comparators. There is inconsistent evidence around the cost effectiveness of physical exercise programmes as a whole, with yoga, but not group exercise, being cost effective. CONCLUSIONS: The identified evidence suggests that combined physical and psychological treatments, medical yoga, information and education programmes, spinal manipulation and acupuncture are likely to be cost-effective options for LBP.  
  Address Health Economics Unit, Public Health Building, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27550240 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2183  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, H.; Adams, C.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese medicine for schizophrenia: A survey of randomized trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists Abbreviated Journal Asia Pac Psychiatry  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Mental Disorders; Schizophrenia  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To survey the reports of randomized trials of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) interventions for schizophrenia and produce a broad overview of this type of research activity in this area. METHOD: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's comprehensive Trials Register (January 2016), selected all relevant randomized trials, and extracted the data within each study. Finally, we sought relevant reviews on the Cochrane Library. RESULTS: We initially screened 423 articles from which we identified 378 relevant studies randomizing 35 341 participants (average study size 94, SD 60). There were 7 herbs used as single medicine, 4 compositions or extractions, more than 144 herbal mixes, and 7 TCM principles reported for schizophrenia. Nonpharmacological interventions of TCM included acupuncture and exercise. The most commonly evaluated treatments are Ginkgo biloba, acupuncture, Wendan decoction, and Shugan Jieyu Capsule. There are 3 directly relevant Cochrane reviews. CONCLUSIONS: Most treatment approaches-and some in common use-have only one or two relevant small trials. Some coordination of effort would help ensure that further well-designed appropriately sized randomized trials are conducted. Systematic reviews should be performed in this field but with titles that take into account the complexity of TCM.  
  Address Cochrane Schizophrenia Group, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Schizophrenia
  Disease Category Mental Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27734592 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2186  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H.; Vertosick, E.A.; Foster, N.E.; Lewith, G.; Linde, K.; Sherman, K.J.; Witt, C.M.; Vickers, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The persistence of the effects of acupuncture after a course of treatment: a meta-analysis of patients with chronic pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 158 Issue 5 Pages 784-793  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Animals; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Humans  
  Abstract There is uncertainty regarding how long the effects of acupuncture treatment persist after a course of treatment. We aimed to determine the trajectory of pain scores over time after acupuncture, using a large individual patient data set from high-quality randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain. The available individual patient data set included 29 trials and 17,922 patients. The chronic pain conditions included musculoskeletal pain (low back, neck, and shoulder), osteoarthritis of the knee, and headache/migraine. We used meta-analytic techniques to determine the trajectory of posttreatment pain scores. Data on longer term follow-up were available for 20 trials, including 6376 patients. In trials comparing acupuncture to no acupuncture control (wait-list, usual care, etc), effect sizes diminished by a nonsignificant 0.011 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: -0.014 to 0.037, P = 0.4) after treatment ended. The central estimate suggests that approximately 90% of the benefit of acupuncture relative to controls would be sustained at 12 months. For trials comparing acupuncture to sham, we observed a reduction in effect size of 0.025 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: 0.000-0.050, P = 0.050), suggesting approximately a 50% diminution at 12 months. The effects of a course of acupuncture treatment for patients with chronic pain do not seem to decrease importantly over 12 months. Patients can generally be reassured that treatment effects persist. Studies of the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture should take our findings into account when considering the time horizon of acupuncture effects. Further research should measure longer term outcomes of acupuncture.  
  Address aDepartment of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom bDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA cResearch Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom dDepartment of Primary Care, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom eInstitute of General Practice, Technische Universitat Munchen, Munchen, Germany fGroup Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA gInstitute for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland hInstitute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite-Universitatsmedizin, Berlin, Germany iCenter for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27764035; PMCID:PMC5393924 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2220  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Perez-Palomares, S.; Olivan-Blazquez, B.; Perez-Palomares, A.; Gaspar-Calvo, E.; Perez-Benito, M.; Lopez-Lapena, E.; de la Torre-Beldarrain, M.L.; Magallon-Botaya, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contribution of Dry Needling to Individualized Physical Therapy Treatment of Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 47 Issue 1 Pages 11-20  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Shoulder Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Acu Versus Usual Care; Dry Needling, With Acupuncture Needle; Myofascial Trigger Points; MTrPs; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom Based Point Selection; Usual Care Control, Physical  
  Abstract Study Design Multicenter, parallel randomized clinical trial. Background Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are implicated in shoulder pain and functional limitations. An intervention intended to treat MTrPs is dry needling. Objectives To investigate the effectiveness of dry needling in addition to evidence-based personalized physical therapy treatment in the treatment of shoulder pain. Methods One hundred twenty patients with nonspecific shoulder pain were randomly allocated into 2 parallel groups: (1) personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment; and (2) trigger point dry needling in addition to personalized, evidence-based physical therapy treatment. Patients were assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was pain assessed by a visual analog scale at 3 months, and secondary variables were joint range-of-motion limitations, Constant-Murley score for pain and function, and number of active MTrPs. Clinical efficacy was assessed using intention-to-treat analysis. Results Of the 120 enrolled patients, 63 were randomly assigned to the control group and 57 to the intervention group. There were no significant differences in outcome between the 2 treatment groups. Both groups showed improvement over time. Conclusion Dry needling did not offer benefits in addition to personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment for patients with nonspecific shoulder pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered February 11, 2009 at www.isrctn.com (ISRCTN30907460). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):11-20. Epub 9 Dec 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6698.  
  Address Dr. Barbara Olivan-Blazquez, Department of Psychology and Sociology, University of Zaragoza, Violante de Hungria 23, 50-009 Zaragoza, Spain  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency <1/WK Number of Participants 120  
  Time in Treatment 10 Weeks Condition Shoulder Pain
  Disease Category Shoulder Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27937046 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2213  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vixner, L.; Schytt, E.; Martensson, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 180-188  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Analgesia; Adult; Age Factors; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Labor Pain/*therapy; Labor, Obstetric; Pregnancy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; Acupuncture; Obstetrics; Pain Management  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Patient characteristics are modulators of pain experience after acupuncture treatment for chronic pain. Whether this also applies to labour pain is unknown. AIM: To examine for associations between maternal characteristics and response to acupuncture in terms of labour pain intensity in close proximity to the treatment (within 60 min) and over a longer time period (up to 240 min), and whether or not epidural analgesia is used, before and after adjustment for obstetric status upon admission to the labour ward. METHODS: Cohort study (n=253) using data collected for a randomised controlled trial. Associations were examined using linear mixed models and logistic regression analyses. Tests of interactions were also applied to investigate whether maternal characteristics were influenced by treatment group allocation. RESULTS: In close proximity to the treatment, advanced age and cervical dilation were associated with lower pain scores (mean difference (MD) -13.2, 95% CI -23.4 to -2.9; and MD -5.0, 95% CI -9.6 to -0.5, respectively). For the longer time period, labour pain was negatively associated with age (MD -11.8, 95% CI -19.6 to -3.9) and positively associated with dysmenorrhoea (MD 5.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Previous acupuncture experience and advanced cervical dilatation were associated with higher and lower use of epidural analgesia (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.9; and OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5, respectively). No interactions with treatment allocation were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study did not identify any maternal characteristics associated with women's responses to acupuncture during labour. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01197950; Post-results.  
  Address School of Health and Education, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27986648; PMCID:PMC5466917 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, Y.; Xia, X.-R.; Ochin, H.; Huang, C.; Gao, C.; Gao, L.; Cui, Y.-G.; Liu, J.-Y.; Meng, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gynecol Obstet  
  Volume 295 Issue 3 Pages 543-558  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Clinical pregnancy rate; In vitro fertilization  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Controversial results have been reported concerning the effect of acupuncture on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. The current review was conducted to systematically review published studies of the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. METHODS: Women undergoing IVF in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were evaluated for the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. The treatment groups involved traditional, electrical, laser, auricular, and other acupuncture techniques. The control groups consisted of no, sham, and placebo acupuncture. The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched. The pregnancy outcomes data are expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on a fixed model or random model depending on the heterogeneity determined by the Q test and I2 statistic. The major outcomes were biochemical pregnancy rate (BPR), clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), and ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR). Heterogeneity of the therapeutic effect was evaluated by a forest plot analysis, and publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot analysis. RESULTS: Thirty trials (a total of 6344 participants) were included in this review. CPR data showed a significant difference between the acupuncture and control groups (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.50, p = 0.01), but there was significant statistical heterogeneity among the studies (p = 0.0002). When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area trials with a sensitivity analysis, the results significantly benefited the CPR in Asian group (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.20, p = 0.03). Based on the area subgroup analysis, we found that in the Asian group, the IVF outcomes from the EA groups were all significantly higher than those from the control groups (CPR: OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.72, p = 0.005; BPR: OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02, p = 0.02; LBR: OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.44-3.88, p = 0.0007; OPR: OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.64, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, compared with other acupuncture time, the IVF outcome results were significantly superior in the acupuncture group when acupuncture was conducted during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) (CPR: OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.27-2.29, p = 0.0004; LBR: OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.54-3.78, p = 0.0001; BPR: OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02-2.20, p = 0.04; OPR: OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.06-3.34, p = 0.03). However, when acupuncture was conducted at the time of embryo transfer, the BPR and OPR from the acupuncture groups were significantly lower than those of the controls in the Asian group (BPR: OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.48-0.92, p = 0.01; OPR: OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Based on an analysis of the studies, acupuncture improves the CPR among women undergoing IVF. When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area patients, compared with traditional acupuncture and other methods, electrical acupuncture yielded better IVF outcomes. Optimal positive effects could be expected using acupuncture in IVF during COH, especially in Asian area. However, as a limitation of this review, most of the included studies did not mention the number of embryos transferred.  
  Address The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Clinical Center of Reproductive Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. ctmengyan@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:27995371 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2184  
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Author Schlaeger, J.M.; Gabzdyl, E.M.; Bussell, J.L.; Takakura, N.; Yajima, H.; Takayama, M.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Acupressure in Labor Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 62 Issue 1 Pages 12-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Delivery, Obstetric; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture and acupressure, 2 modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine, are based on reducing pain and symptoms of disease through balancing yin and yang. Acupuncture and acupressure have been used in China for reduction of labor pain, labor augmentation, and other intrapartum indications for more than 2 millennia. This article presents a review of the current literature that has addressed the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on intrapartum events. Studies of acupuncture have demonstrated that acupuncture may reduce labor pain, the use of pharmacologic agents, the use of forceps and vacuum-assisted births, and the length of labor. Studies that examined the effect of acupuncture on labor that is induced or augmented for premature rupture of membranes have found that acupuncture may increase the degree of cervical ripening but does not reduce the amount of oxytocin or epidural analgesia administration, nor does it shorten length of induced labor. Acupressure may reduce labor pain and labor duration, but acupressure has not been found to increase cervical ripening or induce labor. There are insufficient studies about acupuncture and acupressure and their effects on labor at this time, and there is need for further research. Areas of uncertainty include efficacy, optimal point selection, best techniques, and length of time for point stimulation.  
  Address Judith M. Schlaeger, CNM, PhD, LAc, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing (M/C 802), Room 856, 845 S. Damen Ave. Chicago, IL 60612  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Delivery, Obstetric
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28002621 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2211  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jo, J.; Lee, Y.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 162-170  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Genital Diseases, Female; Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome; Women's Health; Gynecology; PCOS; Infertility, Female  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). METHODS: We searched a total of 15 databases through October 2015. The participants were women with PCOS (diagnosed using the Rotterdam criteria) undergoing IVF or ICSI. Eligible trials were those with intervention groups receiving manual acupuncture (MA) or electroacupuncture (EA), and control groups receiving sham acupuncture, no treatment or other treatments. Outcomes included the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR) and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and adverse events (AEs). For statistical pooling, the risk ratio (RR) and its 95% (confidence interval) CI was calculated using a random effects model. RESULTS: Four RCTs including 430 participants were selected. All trials compared acupuncture (MA/EA) against no treatment. Acupuncture significantly increased the CPR (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.71) and OPR (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.81) and decreased the risk of OHSS (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.94); however, there was no significant difference in the LBR (RR 1.61, 95% CI 0.73 to 3.58). None of the RCTs reported on AEs. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may increase the CPR and OPR and decrease the risk of OHSS in women with PCOS undergoing IVF or ICSI. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of acupuncture as an adjunct to assisted reproductive technology in this particular population.  
  Address Department of Korean Gynecology, Jaseng Hospital of Korean Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Genital Diseases, Female Condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  Disease Category Genital Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28077366 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Landgren, K.; Hallstrom, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL) Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 171-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Pain; Colic; Acu + Usual Care Versus Usual Care; Acupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; Semi-Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Manualized Acupuncture Protocol; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only; Usual Care Control, Unspecified; Infantile Colic; Pediatrics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating infantile colic with acupuncture is contradictory. AIM: To evaluate and compare the effect of two types of acupuncture versus no acupuncture in infants with colic in public child health centres (CHCs). METHODS: A multicentre, randomised controlled, single-blind, three-armed trial (ACU-COL) comparing two styles of acupuncture with no acupuncture, as an adjunct to standard care, was conducted. Among 426 infants whose parents sought help for colic and registered their child's fussing/crying in a diary, 157 fulfilled the criteria for colic and 147 started the intervention. All infants received usual care plus four extra visits to CHCs with advice/support (twice a week for 2 weeks), comprising gold standard care. The infants were randomly allocated to three groups: (A) standardised minimal acupuncture at LI4; (B) semi-standardised individual acupuncture inspired by Traditional Chinese Medicine; and (C) no acupuncture. The CHC nurses and parents were blinded. Acupuncture was given by nurses with extensive experience of acupuncture. RESULTS: The effect of the two types of acupuncture was similar and both were superior to gold standard care alone. Relative to baseline, there was a greater relative reduction in time spent crying and colicky crying by the second intervention week (p=0.050) and follow-up period (p=0.031), respectively, in infants receiving either type of acupuncture. More infants receiving acupuncture cried <3 hours/day, and thereby no longer fulfilled criteria for colic, in the first (p=0.040) and second (p=0.006) intervention weeks. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture appears to reduce crying in infants with colic safely. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01761331; Results.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, Lund SE-22100, Sweden  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 4  
  Treatment Follow-up 3 Weeks Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 157  
  Time in Treatment 2 Weeks Condition Colic
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28093383 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2174  
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Author Lee, S.-H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on Parkinson disease: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages e5836  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most-common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease. The long-term use of levodopa leads to a loss of efficacy and to complications. Therefore, many patients with PD have turned to complementary therapies to help relieve their symptoms. Acupuncture is most commonly used as a complementary therapy in patients with PD. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acupuncture for patients with PD. This study was performed to summarize and evaluate evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in the relief of PD symptoms. METHODS: Seven databases, namely, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], and three Korean medical databases, were searched from their inception through August 2015 without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they contained reports of acupuncture compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone or acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for PD symptoms. Assessments were performed with the unified PD rating scales (UPDRS) I, II, III, and IV and the total score, the Webster scale, and effectiveness rating. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB). RESULTS: In all, 982 potentially relevant articles were identified; 25 RCTs met our inclusion criterion, 19 of 25 RCTs were high-quality studies (i.e., a score of 6 or higher). The included RCTs showed favorable results for acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in the UPDRS II, III, and IV and the total score. Acupuncture was effective in relieving PD symptoms compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone, and acupuncture plus conventional treatment had a more significant effect than conventional treatment alone. CONCLUSIONS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the use of acupuncture for relief of PD symptoms and found that acupuncture has significant positive effects. Acupuncture can be considered as a combination treatment with conventional treatment for patients with PD. Further studies on this topic should be carried out according to rigorous methodological designs in both the East and the West.  
  Address aDepartment of Applied Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University bResearch Group of Pain and Neuroscience, WHO Collaborating Center for Traditional Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute cDepartment of Meridian and Acupoint, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28099340; PMCID:PMC5279085 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2217  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, R.; Li, X.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Yang, K.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Manual acupuncture for myofascial pain syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of manual acupuncture (MA) in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing MA versus sham/placebo or no intervention in patients with MPS in the following databases from inception to January 2016: PubMed; Cochrane Library; Embase; Web of Science; and China Biology Medicine. Two reviewers independently screened the literature extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies according to the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Handbook (V.5.1.0). Then, a meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software. RESULTS: Ten RCTs were combined in a meta-analysis of MA versus sham, which showed a favourable effect of MA on pain intensity after stimulation of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.90, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.32; p=0.002) but not traditional acupuncture points (p>0.05). Benefit was seen both after a single treatment (SMD -1.05, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.27; p=0.009) and course of eight sessions (weighted mean difference (WMD) -1.96, 95% CI -2.72 to -1.20; p<0.001). We also found a significant increase in pressure pain threshold following MA stimulation of MTrPs (WMD 1.00, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.67; p=0.004). Two of the included studies reported mild adverse events (soreness/haemorrhage) secondary to MA. CONCLUSIONS: Through stimulation of MTrPs, MA might be efficacious in terms of pain relief and reduction of muscle irritability in MPS patients. Additional well-designed/reported studies are required to determine the optimal number of sessions for the treatment of MPS.  
  Address Department of Joint Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Military Command, Lanzhou, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28115321 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2173  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, B.H.; Kim, K.; Nam, H.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparative study on the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture, and digital electroacupuncture to treat tinnitus: A randomized, paralleled, open-labeled exploratory trial Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 85  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Ear Diseases; Tinnitus; Hearing Disorders; Acu Versus Acu; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Auricular Electroacupuncture; TCM Acupuncture Style; CAM Control; Fixed Acupuncture Protocol; Traditional Diagnosis Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many previous studies of electroacupuncture used combined therapy of electroacupuncture and systemic manual acupuncture, so it was uncertain which treatment was effective. This study evaluated and compared the effects of systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture for treating patients with tinnitus. METHODS: A randomized, parallel, open-labeled exploratory trial was conducted. Subjects aged 20-75 years who had suffered from idiopathic tinnitus for > 2 weeks were recruited from May 2013 to April 2014. The subjects were divided into three groups by systemic manual acupuncture group (MA), periauricular electroacupuncture group (PE), and distal electroacupuncture group (DE). The groups were selected by random drawing. Nine acupoints (TE 17, TE21, SI19, GB2, GB8, ST36, ST37, TE3 and TE9), two periauricular acupoints (TE17 and TE21), and four distal acupoints (TE3, TE9, ST36, and ST37) were selected. The treatment sessions were performed twice weekly for a total of eight sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes were the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) score and the loud and uncomfortable visual analogue scales (VAS). Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were compared between the groups upon admission using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the THI, VAS loud, and VAS uncomfortable scores. The least significant difference test was used as a post-hoc test. RESULTS: Thirty-nine subjects were eligible and their data were analyzed. No difference in THI and VAS loudness scores was observed in between groups. The VAS uncomfortable scores decreased significantly in MA and DE compared with those in PE. Within the group, all three treatments showed some effect on THI, VAS loudness scores and VAS uncomfortable scores after treatment except DE in THI. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference between systemic manual acupuncture, periauricular electroacupuncture and distal electroacupuncture in tinnitus. However, all three treatments had some effect on tinnitus within the group before and after treatment. Systemic manual acupuncture and distal electroacupuncture have some effect on VAS uncomfortable. TRIAL REGISTRATION: KCT0001991 by CRIS (Clinical Research Information Service), 2016-8-1, retrospectively registered.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-701, Republic of Korea. ophthrl@khu.ac.kr  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 8  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency >1/WK Number of Participants 42  
  Time in Treatment 4 Weeks Condition Tinnitus
  Disease Category Ear Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28143471; PMCID:PMC5282839 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grant, S.; Colaiaco, B.; Motala, A.; Shanman, R.; Sorbero, M.; Hempel, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Adults with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) Abbreviated Journal J Trauma Dissociation  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Alternative medicine; complementary medicine; meta-analysis; posttraumatic stress disorder; systematic review  
  Abstract Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet its clinical effects are unclear. This review aims to estimate effects of acupuncture on PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep quality for adults with PTSD. We searched 10 databases in January 2016 to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We performed random effects meta-analyses and examined quality of the body of evidence (QoE) using the GRADE approach to rate confidence in meta-analytic effect estimates. Seven RCTs with 709 participants met inclusion criteria. We identified very low QoE indicating significant differences favoring acupuncture (versus any comparator) at post-intervention on PTSD symptoms (standardized mean difference [SMD] = -0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.59, -0.01], 6 RCTs), and low QoE at longer follow-up on PTSD (SMD = -0.46, 95% CI [-0.85, -0.06], 4 RCTs) and depressive symptoms (SMD = -0.56; 95% CI [-0.88, -0.23], 4 RCTs). No significant differences were observed between acupuncture and comparators at post-intervention for depressive symptoms (SMD = -0.58, 95% CI [-1.18, 0.01], 6 RCTs, very low QoE), anxiety symptoms (SMD = -0.82, 95% CI [-2.16, 0.53], 4 RCTs, very low QoE), and sleep quality (SMD = -0.46, 95% CI [-3.95, 3.03], 2 RCTs, low QoE). Safety data (7 RCTs) suggest little risk of serious adverse events, though some participants experienced minor/moderate pain, superficial bleeding, and hematoma at needle insertion sites. To increase confidence in findings, sufficiently powered replication trials are needed that measure all relevant clinical outcomes and dedicate study resources to minimizing participant attrition.  
  Address a RAND Corporation , Santa Monica , California , USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28151093 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2214  
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Author Salazar, A.P. de S.; Stein, C.; Marchese, R.R.; Plentz, R.D.M.; Pagnussat, A.D.S. url  openurl
  Title Electric Stimulation for Pain Relief in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Pain Physician Abbreviated Journal Pain Physician  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 15-25  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome whose primary symptoms include chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The treatment of patients with FM aims to provide symptomatic relief and improvement in physical capacities to perform daily tasks and quality of life. Invasive or non-invasive electric stimulation (ES) is used for pain relief in patients with FM. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of treatment with ES, combined or not combined with other types of therapy, for pain relief in patients with FM. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: Electronic search was conducted on databases (from the inception to April 2016): MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane CENTRAL), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). METHODS: Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies based on the inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of ES combined or not with other types of treatment for pain relief in patients with FM (according to the American College of Rheumatology), regardless of the ES dosages. The primary outcome was pain, assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes extracted were quality of life, assessed by short form-36 health survey (SF- 36), and fatigue, assessed by VAS. RESULTS: Nine studies were included, with 301 patients. The meta-analysis for pain showed positive effect of ES treatment versus control [-1.24 (95% CI: -2.39 to -0.08; I(2): 87%, P = 0.04) n = 8 RCTs]. The sensitivity analysis for pain showed significant results for invasive ES, combined or not with other types of therapy [-0.94 (95% CI, -1.50 to -0.38; I(2) 0%, P = 0.001) n = 3 RCTs]. No significant improvement was found regarding quality of life [-3.48 (95% CI: -12.58 to 5.62; I(2): 0%, P = 0.45), n = 2 RCTs] or fatigue [-0.57 (95% CI, -1.25 to 0.11; I(2) 34%, P = 0.100; n = 4 RCTs]. LIMITATIONS: This systematic review included a small number of studies and reduced number of participants in each study. Furthermore, most of the studies showed some biases and lack of methodological quality. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that there is low-quality evidence for the effectiveness of ES for pain relief in patients with FM. However, moderate-quality evidence for the effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA), combined or not combined with other types of treatment, was found for pain relief. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: PROSPERO under the identification CRD42015025323Key words: Electric stimulation, electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, pain, fibromyalgia, review, physical therapy, rehabilitation.  
  Address 1Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Reabilitacao, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Bolsista de Desenvolvimento Tecnico e Industrial da Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Movement Analysis and Neurological Rehabilitation Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil; Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre, Brazil  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28158150 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2222  
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Author Gattie, E.; Cleland, J.A.; Snodgrass, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Musculoskeletal Conditions by Physical Therapists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 47 Issue 3 Pages 133-149  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Dry Needling; Myofascial Trigger Points  
  Abstract Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Background An increasing number of physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain. Objective To examine the short- and long-term effectiveness of dry needling delivered by a physical therapist for any musculoskeletal pain condition. Methods Electronic databases were searched. Eligible randomized controlled trials included those with human subjects who had musculoskeletal conditions that were treated with dry needling performed by a physical therapist, compared with a control or other intervention. The overall quality of the evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Results The initial search returned 218 articles. After screening, 13 were included. Physiotherapy Evidence Database quality scale scores ranged from 4 to 9 (out of a maximum score of 10), with a median score of 7. Eight meta-analyses were performed. In the immediate to 12-week follow-up period, studies provided evidence that dry needling may decrease pain and increase pressure pain threshold when compared to control/sham or other treatment. At 6 to 12 months, dry needling was favored for decreasing pain, but the treatment effect was not statistically significant. Dry needling, when compared to control/sham treatment, provides a statistically significant effect on functional outcomes, but not when compared to other treatments. Conclusion Very low-quality to moderate-quality evidence suggests that dry needling performed by physical therapists is more effective than no treatment, sham dry needling, and other treatments for reducing pain and improving pressure pain threshold in patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain in the immediate to 12-week follow-up period. Low-quality evidence suggests superior outcomes with dry needling for functional outcomes when compared to no treatment or sham needling. However, no difference in functional outcomes exists when compared to other physical therapy treatments. Evidence of long-term benefit of dry needling is currently lacking. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1a. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):133-149. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7096.  
  Address Dr Eric Gattie, 264 Pleasant Street, Concord, NH 03301  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28158962 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2212  
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Author Cheng, K.; Law, A.; Guo, M.; Wieland, L.S.; Shen, X.; Lao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for acute hordeolum Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages Cd011075  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or comparing acupuncture plus another treatment versus another treatment alone. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures used by Cochrane. MAIN RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs with a total of 531 participants from China. The mean age of the participants ranged from 18 to 28 years. Four RCTs included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum with a duration of less than seven days; one RCT included participants diagnosed with initial acute hordeolum without specifying the duration; and one RCT included participants with recurrent acute hordeolum with a mean duration of 24 days. About 55% (291/531) of participants were women. Three RCTs included participants with either external or internal hordeolum; one RCT included participants with only external hordeolum; and two RCTs did not specify the type of hordeolum. Follow-up was no more than seven days after treatment in all included RCTs; no data were available for long-term outcomes. Overall, the certainty of the evidence for all outcomes was low to very low, and we judged all RCTs to be at high or unclear risk of bias.Three RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional treatments. We did not pool the data from these RCTs because the conventional treatments were not similar among trials. Two trials showed that resolution of acute hordeolum was more likely in the acupuncture group when compared with topical antibiotics (1 RCT; 32 participants; risk ratio (RR) 3.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34 to 9.70; low-certainty of evidence) or oral antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 120 participants; RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.78; low-certainty of evidence). In the third trial, little or no difference in resolution of hordeolum was observed when acupuncture was compared with topical antibiotics plus warm compresses (1 RCT; 109 participants; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.04; low-certainty of evidence). One RCT mentioned adverse outcomes, stating that there was no adverse event associated with acupuncture.Three RCTs compared acupuncture plus conventional treatments (two RCTs used topical antibiotics and warm compresses, one RCT used topical antibiotics only) versus the conventional treatments alone. One of the three RCTs, with very low-certainty evidence, did not report the resolution of acute hordeolum; however, it reported that acute hordeolum relief might be higher when acupuncture was combined with conventional treatments than with conventional treatments alone group (60 participants; RR 1.80; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.23). Pooled analysis of the remaining two RCTs, with low-certainty evidence, estimated resolution of acute hordeolum was slightly higher in the combined treatment group compared with the conventional treatment alone group at 7-day follow-up (210 participants; RR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.23; I2 = 0%). None of the three RCTs reported adverse outcomes. Among the included RCTs, four participants, two from the acupuncture plus conventional treatments group and two from the conventional treatments alone group, withdrew due to exacerbation of symptoms. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Low-certainty evidence suggests that acupuncture with or without conventional treatments may provide short-term benefits for treating acute hordeolum when compared with conventional treatments alone. The certainty of the evidence was low to very low mainly due to small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of masking of the outcome assessors, inadequate or unclear randomization method, and a high or unreported number of dropouts. All RCTs were conducted in China, which may limit their generalizability to non-Chinese populations.Because no RCTs included a valid sham acupuncture control, we cannot rule out a potential expectation/placebo effect associated with acupuncture. As resolution is based on clinical observation, the outcome could be influenced by the observer's knowledge of the assigned treatment. Adverse effects of acupuncture were reported sparsely in the included RCTs, and, when reported, were rare. RCTs with better methodology, longer follow-up, and which are conducted among other populations are warranted to provide more general evidence regarding the benefit of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum.  
  Address School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 10 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam Rd, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes (up) PMID:28181687; PMCID:PMC5378315 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2194  
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