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Author Wang, T.; Xu, C.; Pan, K.; Xiong, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic fatigue syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 163  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: As the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unclear and the treatment is still a big issue. There exists a wide range of literature about acupuncture and moxibustion (AM) for CFS in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). But there are certain doubts as well in the effectiveness of its treatment due to the lack of a comprehensive and evidence-based medical proof to dispel the misgivings. Current study evaluated systematically the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion treatments on CFS, and clarified the difference among them and Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. METHODS: We comprehensively reviewed literature including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CBM (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) up to May 2016, for RCT clinical research on CFS treated by acupuncture and moxibustion. Traditional direct meta-analysis was adopted to analyze the difference between AM and other treatments. Analysis was performed based on the treatment in experiment and control groups. Network meta-analysis was adopted to make comprehensive comparisons between any two kinds of treatments. The primary outcome was total effective rate, while relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as the final pooled statistics. RESULTS: A total of 31 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were enrolled in analyses. In traditional direct meta-analysis, we found that in comparison to Chinese herbal medicine, CbAM (combined acupuncture and moxibustion, which meant two or more types of acupuncture and moxibustion were adopted) had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.17 (1.09 ~ 1.25)). Compared with Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture, SAM (single acupuncture or single moxibustion) had a higher total effective rate, with RR (95% CI) of 1.22 (1.14 ~ 1.30), 1.51 (1.31-1.74), 5.90 (3.64-9.56). In addition, compared with SAM, CbAM had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.23 (1.12 ~ 1.36)). In network meta-analyses, similar results were recorded. Subsequently, we ranked all treatments from high to low effective rate and the order was CbAM, SAM, Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: In the treatment of CFS, CbAM and SAM may have better effect than other treatments. However, the included trials have relatively poor quality, hence high quality studies are needed to confirm our finding.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Gaotanyan Road 30, Shapingba District, Chongqing, 400038, China. hongyanxiong@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28335756; PMCID:PMC5363012 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2188  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, J.; Li, S.-N.; Liu, L.; Zhou, K.; Li, Y.; Cui, X.-Y.; Wan, J.; Lu, J.-J.; Huang, Y.-C.; Wang, X.-S.; Lin, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conventional acupuncture for cardiac arrhythmia: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin J Integr Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arrhythmias, Cardiac  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To exam the effect and safety of conventional acupuncture (CA) on cardiac arrhythmia. METHODS: Nine medical databases were searched until February 2016 for randomized controlled trials. Heterogeneity was measured by Cochran Q test. Meta-analysis was conducted if I2 was less than 85% and the characteristics of included trials were similar. RESULTS: Nine qualified studies involving 638 patients were included. Only 1 study had definitely low risk of bias, while 7 trials were rated as unclear and 1 as high. Meta-analysis of CA alone did not have a significant benefit on response rate compared to amiodarone in patients with atrial fibrillation (Af) and atrial flutter (AF) [relative risk (RR): 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.49; P=0.61; I2=61%, P=0.11]. However, 1 study with higher methodological quality detected a lower recurrence rate of Af in CA alone as compared with sham acupuncture plus no treatment, and benefits on ventricular rate and time of conversion to normal sinus rhythm were found in CA alone group by 1 study, as well as the response rate in CA plus deslanoside group by another study. Meta-analysis of CA plus anti-arrhythmia drug (AAD) was associated with a significant benefit on the response rate when compared with AAD alone in ventricular premature beat (VPB) patients (RR, 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.34; P=0.005; I2=13%, P=0.32), and an improvement in quality-of-life score (QOLS) of VPB also showed in 1 individual study. Besides, a lower heart rate was detected in the CA alone group by 1 individual study when compared with no treatment in sinus tachycardia patients (MD-21.84 [-27.21,-16.47]) and lower adverse events of CA alone were reported than amiodarone. CONCLUSIONS: CA may be a useful and safe alternative or additive approach to AADs for cardiac arrhythmia, especially in VPB and Af patients, which mainly based on a pooled estimate and result from 1 study with higher methodological quality. However, we could not reach a robust conclusion due to low quality of overall evidence.  
  Address Department of Cardiology, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100078, China. 13910565673@126.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Arrhythmias, Cardiac
  Disease Category Cardiovascular Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28432528 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2191  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Dahlen, H.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture or acupressure for induction of labour Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 2017 Issue 10 Pages 1-126  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Labor, Induced; Women's Health; Labor Induction; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture; Acupressure  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This is one of a series of reviews of methods of cervical ripening and labour induction. The use of complementary therapies is increasing. Women may look to complementary therapies during pregnancy and childbirth to be used alongside conventional medical practice. Acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points of the body. Acupressure is using the thumbs or fingers to apply pressure to specific points. The limited observational studies to date suggest acupuncture for induction of labour has no known adverse effects to the fetus, and may be effective. However, the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness of this technique is limited. OBJECTIVES: To determine, from the best available evidence, the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture and acupressure for third trimester cervical ripening or induction of labour. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2016), PubMed (1966 to 25 November 2016), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (25 November 2016), CINAHL (25 November 2016), Embase (25 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Portal (ICTRP) (3 October 2016), and bibliographies of relevant papers. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture or acupressure, used for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction, with placebo/no treatment or other methods on a predefined list of labour induction methods. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data, and checked them for accuracy. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes 22 trials, reporting on 3456 women. The trials using manual or electro-acupuncture were compared with usual care (eight trials, 760 women), sweeping of membranes (one trial, 207 women), or sham controls (seven trials, 729 women). Trials using acupressure were compared with usual care (two trials, 151 women) or sham controls (two trials, 239 women). Many studies had a moderate risk of bias.Overall, few trials reported on primary outcomes. No trial reported vaginal delivery not achieved within 24 hours and uterine hyperstimulation with fetal heart rate (FHR) changes. Serious maternal and neonatal death or morbidity were only reported under acupuncture versus sham control. Acupuncture versus sham control There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 1.15, eight trials, 789 women; high-quality evidence). There were no reports of maternal death or perinatal death in the one trial that reported this outcome. There was evidence of a benefit from acupuncture in improving cervical readiness for labour (mean difference (MD) 0.40, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.69, one trial, 125 women), as measured by cervical maturity within 24 hours using Bishop's score. There was no evidence of a difference between groups for oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, Apgar score < 7 at five minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL, time from the trial to time of birth, use of induction methods, length of labour, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupuncture versus usual care There was no clear difference in caesarean sections between groups (average RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.17, eight trials, 760 women; low-quality evidence). There was an increase in cervical maturation for the acupuncture (electro) group compared with control (MD 1.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 2.49, one trial, 67 women) and a shorter length of labour (minutes) in the usual care group compared to electro-acupuncture (MD 124.00, 95% CI 37.39 to 210.61, one trial, 67 women).There appeared be a differential effect according to type of acupuncture based on subgroup analysis. Electro-acupuncture appeared to have more of an effect than manual acupuncture for the outcomes caesarean section (CS), and instrumental vaginal and spontaneous vaginal birth. It decreased the rate of CS (average RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.80, 3 trials, 327 women), increased the rate of instrumental vaginal birth (average RR 2.30, 95%CI 1.15 to 4.60, two trials, 271 women), and increased the rate of spontaneous vaginal birth (average RR 2.06, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.56, one trial, 72 women). However, subgroup analyses are observational in nature and so results should be interpreted with caution.There were no clear differences between groups for other outcomes: oxytocin augmentation, use of epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, maternal infection, perineal tear, fetal infection, maternal satisfaction, use of other induction methods, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupuncture versus sweeping if fetal membranes One trial of acupuncture versus sweeping of fetal membranes showed no clear differences between groups in caesarean sections (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.22, one trial, 207 women, moderate-quality evidence), need for augmentation, epidural analgesia, instrumental vaginal birth, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, neonatal intensive care admission, and postpartum bleeding greater than 500 mL. Acupressure versus sham control There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to control (RR, 0.94, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.30, two trials, 239 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced oxytocin augmentation, instrumental vaginal birth, meconium-stained liquor, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, and spontaneous vaginal birth. Acupressure versus usual care There was no evidence of benefit from acupressure in reducing caesarean sections compared to usual care (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.53, two trials, 151 women, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence of a clear benefit in reduced epidural analgesia, Apgar score < 7 at 5 minutes, admission to neonatal intensive care, time from trial intervention to birth of the baby, use of other induction methods, and spontaneous vaginal birth. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there was no clear benefit from acupuncture or acupressure in reducing caesarean section rate. The quality of the evidence varied between low to high. Few trials reported on neonatal morbidity or maternal mortality outcomes. Acupuncture showed some benefit in improving cervical maturity, however, more well-designed trials are needed. Future trials could include clinically relevant safety outcomes.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM),Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Sydney, New South Wales, 2751, Australia  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Labor, Induced
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29036756 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2406  
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Author Chaudhry, F.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of dry needling and high-volume image-guided injection in the management of chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy in adult population: a literature review Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology : Orthopedie Traumatologie Abbreviated Journal Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 441-448  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Achilles Tendinopathy; Dry Needling; High-volume image-guided injection  
  Abstract Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse condition affecting the adult population. The incidence is on the rise because of greater participation of people in recreational or competitive sporting activities. There are several treatment options available both non-operative and operative. Ultrasound-guided dry needling and high-volume image-guided injection is relatively a new procedure. The aim of this study was to find out the effectiveness of dry needling and HVIGI in the management of mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy by performing a literature review. Search strategy was devised to find the suitable articles for critical appraisal using the electronic databases. Four articles were selected for critical appraisal, and these papers showed good short- to long-term results of image-guided high-volume injection in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. We conclude that high-volume image-guided injection is effective in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. It provides good short- and medium-term relief of symptoms. It should be considered as one of the many options available for this condition.  
  Address The University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. fouad.chaudhry@doctors.org.uk  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28424882 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2201  
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Author Dimitrova, A.; Murchison, C.; Oken, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for the Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 164-179  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Peripheral Neuropathy; Neuropathic Pain; Polyneuropathy; Mononeuropathy  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Neuropathy and its associated pain pose great therapeutic challenges. While there has been a recent surge in acupuncture use and research, little remains known about its effects on nerve function. This review aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of neuropathy of various etiologies. METHODS: The Medline, AMED, Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL, and clintrials.gov databases were systematically searched from inception to July 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing acupuncture's efficacy for poly- and mononeuropathy were reviewed. Parallel and crossover RCTs focused on acupuncture's efficacy were reviewed and screened for eligibility. The Scale for Assessing Scientific Quality of Investigations in Complementary and Alternative Medicine was used to assess RCT quality. RCTs with score of >9 and active control treatments such as sham acupuncture or medical therapy were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies were included: 13 original RCTs, a long-term follow-up, and a re-analysis of a prior RCT. The selected RCTs studied acupuncture for neuropathy caused by diabetes, Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and idiopathic conditions. Acupuncture regimens, control conditions, and outcome measures differed among studies, and various methodological issues were identified. Still, the majority of RCTs showed benefit for acupuncture over control in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, Bell's palsy, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Acupuncture is probably effective in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathy, and there is insufficient evidence for its benefits in idiopathic neuropathy. Acupuncture appears to improve nerve conduction study parameters in both sensory and motor nerves. Meta-analyses were conducted on all diabetic neuropathy and Bell's palsy individual subject data (six RCTs; a total of 680 subjects) using a summary estimate random effects model, which showed combined odds ratio of 4.23 (95% confidence interval 2.3-7.8; p < 0.001) favoring acupuncture over control for neuropathic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture is beneficial in some peripheral neuropathies, but more rigorously designed studies using sham-acupuncture control are needed to characterize its effect and optimal use better.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, OR  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2209  
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Author Schlaeger, J.M.; Gabzdyl, E.M.; Bussell, J.L.; Takakura, N.; Yajima, H.; Takayama, M.; Wilkie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture and Acupressure in Labor Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health Abbreviated Journal J Midwifery Womens Health  
  Volume 62 Issue 1 Pages 12-28  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Labor, Obstetric; Delivery, Obstetric; Women's Health  
  Abstract Acupuncture and acupressure, 2 modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine, are based on reducing pain and symptoms of disease through balancing yin and yang. Acupuncture and acupressure have been used in China for reduction of labor pain, labor augmentation, and other intrapartum indications for more than 2 millennia. This article presents a review of the current literature that has addressed the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on intrapartum events. Studies of acupuncture have demonstrated that acupuncture may reduce labor pain, the use of pharmacologic agents, the use of forceps and vacuum-assisted births, and the length of labor. Studies that examined the effect of acupuncture on labor that is induced or augmented for premature rupture of membranes have found that acupuncture may increase the degree of cervical ripening but does not reduce the amount of oxytocin or epidural analgesia administration, nor does it shorten length of induced labor. Acupressure may reduce labor pain and labor duration, but acupressure has not been found to increase cervical ripening or induce labor. There are insufficient studies about acupuncture and acupressure and their effects on labor at this time, and there is need for further research. Areas of uncertainty include efficacy, optimal point selection, best techniques, and length of time for point stimulation.  
  Address Judith M. Schlaeger, CNM, PhD, LAc, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing (M/C 802), Room 856, 845 S. Damen Ave. Chicago, IL 60612  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Delivery, Obstetric
  Disease Category Labor, Obstetric OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28002621 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2211  
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Author Gattie, E.; Cleland, J.A.; Snodgrass, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Musculoskeletal Conditions by Physical Therapists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Sports Phys Ther  
  Volume 47 Issue 3 Pages 133-149  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Dry Needling; Myofascial Trigger Points  
  Abstract Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Background An increasing number of physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain. Objective To examine the short- and long-term effectiveness of dry needling delivered by a physical therapist for any musculoskeletal pain condition. Methods Electronic databases were searched. Eligible randomized controlled trials included those with human subjects who had musculoskeletal conditions that were treated with dry needling performed by a physical therapist, compared with a control or other intervention. The overall quality of the evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Results The initial search returned 218 articles. After screening, 13 were included. Physiotherapy Evidence Database quality scale scores ranged from 4 to 9 (out of a maximum score of 10), with a median score of 7. Eight meta-analyses were performed. In the immediate to 12-week follow-up period, studies provided evidence that dry needling may decrease pain and increase pressure pain threshold when compared to control/sham or other treatment. At 6 to 12 months, dry needling was favored for decreasing pain, but the treatment effect was not statistically significant. Dry needling, when compared to control/sham treatment, provides a statistically significant effect on functional outcomes, but not when compared to other treatments. Conclusion Very low-quality to moderate-quality evidence suggests that dry needling performed by physical therapists is more effective than no treatment, sham dry needling, and other treatments for reducing pain and improving pressure pain threshold in patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain in the immediate to 12-week follow-up period. Low-quality evidence suggests superior outcomes with dry needling for functional outcomes when compared to no treatment or sham needling. However, no difference in functional outcomes exists when compared to other physical therapy treatments. Evidence of long-term benefit of dry needling is currently lacking. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1a. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):133-149. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7096.  
  Address Dr Eric Gattie, 264 Pleasant Street, Concord, NH 03301  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28158962 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2212  
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Author Zhang, F.; Yu, X.; Xiao, H. url  openurl
  Title Cardioprotection of Electroacupuncture for Enhanced Recovery after Surgery on Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Replacement with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Control Clinical Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HEART valves -- Surgery; CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; ACUPUNCTURE points; CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Electroacupuncture; CARDIAC surgery; REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); RANDOMIZED controlled trials  
  Abstract We attempted to investigate cardioprotection of electroacupuncture (EA) for enhanced recovery after surgery on patients

undergoing heart valve replacement with cardiopulmonary bypass. Forty-four patients with acquired heart valve replacement were

randomly allocated to the EA group or the control group. Patients in the EA group received EA stimulus at bilateral Neiguan

(PC6), Ximen (PC4), Shenting (GV24), and Baihui (GV20) acupoints twenty minutes before anesthesia induction to the end of

surgery.The primary end point was cardioprotection effect of electroacupuncture postoperatively and the secondary endpoints were

quality of recovery and cognitive functioning postoperatively. The present study demonstrated that electroacupuncture reduced

the occurrence of complications and played a role of cardioprotective effect on patients after heart valve replacement surgery with

cardiopulmonary bypass, and it benefits patients more comfortable and contributes to recovery after surgery.
 
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121302083; Source Information: 2/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: HEART valves -- Surgery; Subject Term: CONVALESCENCE -- Evaluation; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: CARDIOPULMONARY bypass; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: CARDIAC surgery; Subject Term: REIMPLANTATION (Surgery); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 2 Diagrams, 4 Charts, 3 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2227  
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Author Lei, H.; Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, Z. url  openurl
  Title Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral and Hepatic Fat in Women with Abdominal Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Study Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 285-294  
  Keywords OBESITY -- Treatment; FATTY liver -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ADIPOSE tissues; ALTERNATIVE medicine; Anthropometry; HUMAN body composition; CLINICAL trials; Electroacupuncture; LONGITUDINAL method; MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Mathematics; PROBABILITY theory; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); Statistics; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; DATA analysis; BODY mass index; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; WAIST circumference; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; MANN Whitney U Test; China  
  Abstract Objective: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat deposition are the most important risk factors for women's health. Acupuncture, including electroacupuncture (EA), is used to treat obesity throughout the world. The effect of EA is evaluated mainly by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Few studies have assessed its effect in reducing VAT volume and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) based on an exact measurement method such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aimed to resolve this issue. Methods: Thirty subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The control group ( n = 15) did not receive any intervention and maintained a normal diet and their usual exercise habits. The treatment group ( n = 15) received EA three times a week for 3 months. BMI and WC were measured using different devices. VAT and HFF were measured by MRI and calculated by related software before and after the intervention. Results: A marked difference was evident in group that received EA treatment in the following tests. The differences in BMI (U = 21.00, p < 0.001), WC (U = 40.50, p = 0.002), VAT volume (U = 13.00, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (U = 0.00, p < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the treatment group were distinct and significant compared with those of the control group. Three months later, the treatment group showed a lower BMI (W = 91.00, p = 0.001), WC ( t = 4.755, p < 0.001), VAT volume ( t = 5.164, p < 0.001), and mean HFF (W = 120.00, p = 0.001) compared with pretreatment levels. Compared with the control group, the treatment group showed a lower VAT volume ( t = 60.00, p = 0.029) after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months, the control group showed higher mean HFF ( t = ?2.900, p = 0.012) and VAT volume (W = 11.50, p = 0.006) compared with their initial levels. Conclusion: Based on MRI evaluation, this randomized controlled study proved that EA treatment reduces BMI and WC as well as VAT volume and HFF in women with abdominal obesity.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 122401275; Source Information: Apr2017, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p285; Subject Term: OBESITY -- Treatment; Subject Term: FATTY liver -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ADIPOSE tissues; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTHROPOMETRY; Subject Term: HUMAN body composition; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MAGNETIC resonance imaging; Subject Term: MATHEMATICS; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: STATISTICS; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: DATA analysis; Subject Term: BODY mass index; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: WAIST circumference; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: ABDOMINAL adipose tissue; Subject Term: MANN Whitney U Test; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: CHINA; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2228  
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Author Lee, S.-H.; Lim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on Parkinson disease: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages e5836  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most-common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease. The long-term use of levodopa leads to a loss of efficacy and to complications. Therefore, many patients with PD have turned to complementary therapies to help relieve their symptoms. Acupuncture is most commonly used as a complementary therapy in patients with PD. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acupuncture for patients with PD. This study was performed to summarize and evaluate evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in the relief of PD symptoms. METHODS: Seven databases, namely, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], and three Korean medical databases, were searched from their inception through August 2015 without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they contained reports of acupuncture compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone or acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for PD symptoms. Assessments were performed with the unified PD rating scales (UPDRS) I, II, III, and IV and the total score, the Webster scale, and effectiveness rating. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB). RESULTS: In all, 982 potentially relevant articles were identified; 25 RCTs met our inclusion criterion, 19 of 25 RCTs were high-quality studies (i.e., a score of 6 or higher). The included RCTs showed favorable results for acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in the UPDRS II, III, and IV and the total score. Acupuncture was effective in relieving PD symptoms compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone, and acupuncture plus conventional treatment had a more significant effect than conventional treatment alone. CONCLUSIONS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the use of acupuncture for relief of PD symptoms and found that acupuncture has significant positive effects. Acupuncture can be considered as a combination treatment with conventional treatment for patients with PD. Further studies on this topic should be carried out according to rigorous methodological designs in both the East and the West.  
  Address aDepartment of Applied Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University bResearch Group of Pain and Neuroscience, WHO Collaborating Center for Traditional Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute cDepartment of Meridian and Acupoint, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28099340; PMCID:PMC5279085 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2217  
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Author Thiagarajah, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How effective is acupuncture for reducing pain due to plantar fasciitis? Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Singapore Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Singapore Med J  
  Volume 58 Issue 2 Pages 92-97  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Foot Diseases; Fasciitis, Plantar; Musculoskeletal Diseases  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. METHODS: Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected. The Delphi list was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies retrieved. RESULTS: Three studies that compared acupuncture with standard treatment and one study on real versus sham acupuncture were found. These showed that acupuncture significantly reduced pain levels in patients with plantar fasciitis, as measured on the visual analogue scale and the Plantar Fasciitis Pain/Disability Scale. These benefits were noted between four and eight weeks of treatment, with no further significant reduction in pain beyond this duration. Side effects were found to be minimal. CONCLUSION: Although acupuncture may reduce plantar fasciitis pain in the short term, there is insufficient evidence for a definitive conclusion regarding its effectiveness in the longer term. Further research is required to strengthen the acceptance of acupuncture among healthcare providers.  
  Address Queenstown Polyclinic, SingHealth Polyclinics, Singapore  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Fasciitis, Plantar
  Disease Category Foot Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27526703; PMCID:PMC5311890 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2224  
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Author Xiao Wu; Cuihong Zheng; Xiaohu Xu; Pei Ding; Fan Xiong; Man Tian; Ying Wang; Haoxu Dong; Mingmin Zhang; Wei Wang; Shabei Xu; Minjie Xie; Guangying Huang url  openurl
  Title Electroacupuncture for Functional Constipation: A Multicenter, Randomized, Control Trial Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Constipation; Defecation; Electroacupuncture; GASTROINTESTINAL agents; MEDICAL cooperation; ORAL medication; PATIENT satisfaction; QUALITY of life; Research; SAMPLING (Statistics); RANDOMIZED controlled trials; TREATMENT effectiveness  
  Abstract Background and Aim. To investigate the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) with different current intensities for functional constipation (FC) and to assess whether the effects of EA with different current intensities are superior to the mosapride. Methods. Patients with FC were randomly divided into low current intensity group (LCI), high current intensity group (HCI), and mosapride group (MC). The primary outcome was three or more spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) per week and an increase of one or more SBMs from baseline during at least 3 of the 4 weeks. Results. The primary outcome was reached by 53.45%, 66.15%, and 52.24% of the patients who received LCI, HCI, and mosapride, respectively. EA can significantly improve the weekly SBMs and stool consistency and reduce straining severity ( p < 0.0001, all). HCI improved the quality of life better than mosapride ( p < 0.05) and reduced the proportion of severe constipation more than LCI and mosapride ( p < 0.05, both). Conclusions. EA is effective and safe at both current intensities for FC; therapeutic effects of LCI and HCI are not superior to mosapride. EA is superior to mosapride in improving patients’ life quality and satisfaction level of treatment; EA has fewer adverse events than mosapride.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121086632; Source Information: 1/31/2017, p1; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION -- Treatment; Subject Term: CONSTIPATION; Subject Term: DEFECATION; Subject Term: ELECTROACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: GASTROINTESTINAL agents; Subject Term: MEDICAL cooperation; Subject Term: ORAL medication; Subject Term: PATIENT satisfaction; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 10p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 5 Charts, 2 Graphs; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2239  
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Author Shin, N.Y.; Lim, Y.J.; Yang, C.H.; Kim, C. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Alcohol Use Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-6  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Alcoholism; Drug Addiction; Substance Abuse  
  Abstract Empirical research has produced mixed results regarding the e?ects of acupuncture on the treatment of alcohol use disorder in humans. Few studies have provided a comprehensive review or a systematic overview of the magnitude of the treatment e?ect

of acupuncture on alcoholism. This study investigated the e?ects of acupuncture on alcohol-related symptoms and behaviors in patients with this disorder. The PubMed database was searched until 23 August 2016, and reference lists from review studies were also reviewed. Seventeen studies were identified for a full-text inspection, and seven (243 patients) of these met our inclusion criteria. The outcomes assessed at the last posttreatment point and any available follow-up data were extracted from each of the studies. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that an acupuncture intervention had a stronger e?ect on reducing alcohol-related symptoms and behaviors than did the control intervention (g = 0.67). A beneficial but weak effect of acupuncture treatment was also found in the follow-up data (g = 0.29). Although our analysis showed a significant difference between acupuncture and the control intervention in patients with alcohol use disorder, this meta-analysis is limited by the small number of studies included. Thus, a larger cohort study is required to provide a firm conclusion.
 
  Address Chae Ha Yang, chyang@dhu.ac.kr; Cheongtag Kim, ctkim@snu.ac.kr  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Alcohol-Related Disorders
  Disease Category Substance-Related Disorders OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 120681737; Source Information: 1/12/2017, p1; Subject Term: ALCOHOL-induced disorders -- Treatment; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE; Subject Term: EXPERIMENTAL design; Subject Term: LONGITUDINAL method; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: META-analysis; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: EMPIRICAL research; Subject Term: TREATMENT effectiveness; Subject Term: CONTROL groups (Research); Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 6p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 3 Charts; ; Document Type: Article; Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2244  
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Author Derksen, T.M.E.; Bours, M.J.L.; Mols, F.; Weijenberg, M.P. url  openurl
  Title Lifestyle-Related Factors in the Self-Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM) Abbreviated Journal Evidence-based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (eCAM)  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords ALTERNATIVE medicine; ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; COLON tumors; DIETARY supplements; Exercise; INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Medline; PERIPHERAL neuropathy; ONLINE information services; QUALITY of life; RECTUM -- Tumors; HEALTH self-care; SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Oxaliplatin; Lifestyles  
  Abstract Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify lifestyle-related factors that can aid in preventing or reducing CIPN, as such factors may promote self-management options for CRC patients suffering from CIPN. Methods. A literature search was conducted through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. Original research articles investigating oxaliplatin-related CIPN in CRC were eligible for inclusion. Results. In total, 22 articles were included, which suggested that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants and herbal extracts, as well as physical exercise and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, may have beneficial effects on preventing or reducing CIPN symptoms. However, many of the reviewed articles presented various limitations, including small sample sizes and heterogeneity in study design and measurements of CIPN. Conclusions. No strong conclusions can be drawn regarding the role of lifestyle-related factors in the management of CIPN in CRC patients. Certain dietary supplements and physical exercise may be beneficial for the management of CIPN, but further research is warranted.  
  Address  
  Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 121885369; Source Information: 3/16/2017, p1; Subject Term: ALTERNATIVE medicine; Subject Term: ANTINEOPLASTIC agents; Subject Term: COLON tumors; Subject Term: DIETARY supplements; Subject Term: EXERCISE; Subject Term: INFORMATION storage & retrieval systems -- Medicine; Subject Term: MEDLINE; Subject Term: PERIPHERAL neuropathy; Subject Term: ONLINE information services; Subject Term: QUALITY of life; Subject Term: RECTUM -- Tumors; Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: SYSTEMATIC reviews (Medical research); Subject Term: OXALIPLATIN; Subject Term: LIFESTYLES; Subject Term: ; Number of Pages: 14p; ; Illustrations: 1 Diagram, 1 Chart; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2283  
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Author Nakamura, S.; Horiuchi, S. url  openurl
  Title Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Effectiveness of a Self-Care Program for Pregnant Women for Relieving Hiesho Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 53-59  
  Keywords ARM -- Physiology; EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; LEG -- Physiology; PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; ACUPUNCTURE points; ANALYSIS of variance; BODY temperature; CHI-squared test; CLINICAL trials; CLOTHING & dress; CONFIDENCE intervals; EXERCISE therapy; MEDICAL thermography; PROBABILITY theory; Questionnaires; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SCALE analysis (Psychology); HEALTH self-care; T-test (Statistics); WOMEN -- Health; STATISTICAL power analysis; STATISTICAL significance; SKIN temperature; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; RELATIVE risk (Medicine); PRE-tests & post-tests; DATA analysis -- Software; DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Pregnancy; Japan  
  Abstract Background A group of adults can be identified with chronic non-responding anxiety symptoms who have repeatedly accessed treatments through their GP, such as cognitive behaviour therapy, bibliotherapy and medication, but with no effect. These patients make heavy use of health service resources with no beneficial outcome. This study aims to test the effect of an acupuncture formula of three specific acupuncture points, suggested in a previous pilot study. Method 40 participants from a psychiatry waiting list were randomised into one of two groups: group 1 (n=25) received 10 weeks of acupuncture at PC6, HT7 and LR3, and group 2 was a waiting list control group. The waiting list group (n=15) then received acupuncture. Both groups were followed up for 10 weeks after treatment. The outcome measure was the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results 36 patients completed the study, with two dropouts in each group. State anxiety scores in the acupuncture group decreased from 57.7 (SD 13.1) to 38.8 (12.0); scores in the waiting list control group decreased from 61.5 (11.6) to 60.6 (11.7). The difference was highly significant (p<0.0001). Similar changes were seen for trait anxiety scores. The control group showed similar statistically significant improvements when they received acupuncture. The improvements were maintained after 10 weeks of follow-up in each group. Conclusions Acupuncture is a promising intervention for patients with chronic anxiety symptoms that have proven resistant to other forms of treatment.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes Accession Number: 120746245; Source Information: Jan2017, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p53; Subject Term: ARM -- Physiology; Subject Term: EXTREMITIES (Anatomy) -- Physiology; Subject Term: LEG -- Physiology; Subject Term: PREGNANCY complications -- Prevention; Subject Term: ACUPUNCTURE points; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: BODY temperature; Subject Term: CHI-squared test; Subject Term: CLINICAL trials; Subject Term: CLOTHING & dress; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: EXERCISE therapy; Subject Term: MEDICAL thermography; Subject Term: PROBABILITY theory; Subject Term: QUESTIONNAIRES; Subject Term: RESEARCH -- Finance; Subject Term: SAMPLING (Statistics); Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: HEALTH self-care; Subject Term: T-test (Statistics); Subject Term: WOMEN -- Health; Subject Term: STATISTICAL power analysis; Subject Term: STATISTICAL significance; Subject Term: SKIN temperature; Subject Term: RANDOMIZED controlled trials; Subject Term: RELATIVE risk (Medicine); Subject Term: PRE-tests & post-tests; Subject Term: DATA analysis -- Software; Subject Term: DESCRIPTIVE statistics; Subject Term: PREGNANCY; Subject Term: ; Geographic Subject: JAPAN; Geographic Subject: ; Number of Pages: 7p; ; Document Type: Article; Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2288  
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Author Xu, Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, T.; Bu, H.; Zhao, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Song, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of acupoint-stimulation for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea compared with NSAIDs: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 RCTs Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Complement Altern Med  
  Volume 17 Issue 436 Pages 1-12  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Menstruation Disturbances; Dysmenorrhea; Women's Health; Gynecology; Acupuncture; Auricular Acupressure; Moxibustion; Direct Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa; Electroacupuncture; Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs; NSAIDs  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD), defined as painful menses in women with normal pelvic anatomy, is one of the most common gynaecological syndromes. Acupoint-stimulation could potentially be an effective intervention for PD. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of acupoint-stimulation compared with Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NASIDs) in the treatment of PD. METHODS: Six databases were searched to December 2014. Sixteen studies involving 1679 PD patients were included. We included randomized controlled trials that compared acupoint-stimulation with NASIDs for the treatment of PD. The main outcomes assessed were clinical effectiveness rate, symptom score, visual analogue score, variation in peripheral blood prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) and side effects. All analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis statistical software. RESULTS: (1) The total efficacy was better than control group: odds ratio = 5.57; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 3.96, 7.83; P < 0.00001; (2) The effect of intervention was positive in relieving the severity of PD symptoms: mean difference (MD) = 2.99; 95%CI = 2.49, 3.49; P < 0.00001; (3) No statistical difference existed between two groups in terms of a reduction in the VAS: MD = 1.24; 95%CI = -3.37, 5.85; P = 0.60; (4) The effect of intervention on the variation in peripheral blood PGF2alpha between two groups was positive: MD = 7.55; 95%CI = 4.29,10.82; P < 0.00001; (5) The side effects of control groups was more than the acupoint-stimulation group: OR = 0.03; 95%CI =0.00,0.22; P = 0.0005. CONCLUSIONS: According to this article, acupoint-stimulation can relieve pain effectively in the treatment of PD and offers advantages in increasing the overall effectiveness.  
  Address Graduate School, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Dysmenorrhea
  Disease Category Menstruation Disturbances OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28859645; PMCID:PMC5580316 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2411  
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Author Noh, H.; Kwon, S.; Cho, S.-Y.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, S.-K.; Park, J.-M.; Ko, C.-N.; Park, S.-U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 86-103  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Nervous System Diseases; Parkinson Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Acupuncture; Electroacupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: English, Chinese, and Korean electronic databases were searched up to June 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible. The methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane's risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3. RESULTS: In total, 42 studies involving 2625 participants were systematically reviewed. Participants treated using combined acupuncture and conventional medication (CM) showed significant improvements in total Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS), UPDRS I, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, and the Webster scale compared to those treated using CM alone. The combination of electroacupuncture and CM was significantly superior to CM alone in total UPDRS, UPDRS I, UPDRS II, and UPDRS IV. Similarly, the combination of scalp electroacupuncture, acupuncture, and CM was significantly more effective than CM alone in total UPDRS. However, our meta-analysis showed that the combination of electroacupuncture and CM was not significantly more effective than CM alone in UPDRS III, the Webster, and the Tension Assessment Scale. The results also failed to show that acupuncture was significantly more effective than placebo acupuncture in total UPDRS. Overall, the methodological quality of the RCTs was low. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: We found that acupuncture might be a safe and useful adjunctive treatment for patients with PD. However, because of methodological flaws in the included studies, conclusive evidence is still lacking. More rigorous and well-designed placebo-controlled trials should be conducted.  
  Address Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Parkinson Disease
  Disease Category Nervous System Diseases OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2409  
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Author Ye, Q.; Xie, Y.; Shi, J.; Xu, Z.; Ou, A.; Xu, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review on Acupuncture for Treatment of Dysphagia after Stroke Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume 2017 Issue Pages 1-18  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Stroke; Deglutition Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Swallowing Disorders; Dysphagia; Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the therapeutic efficacy of acupuncture for dysphagia after stroke. METHODS: Seven electronic databases were searched from their inception until 31 September 2016. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) incorporating acupuncture or acupuncture combined with other interventions for treatment of dysphagia after stroke were enrolled. Then they were extracted and assessed by two independent evaluators. Direct comparisons were conducted in RevMan 5.3.0 software. RESULTS: 6010 patients of 71 papers were included. The pooled analysis of efficacy rate of 58 studies indicated that acupuncture group was superior to the control group with moderate heterogeneity (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.13 1.21, Z = 9.08, and P < 0.00001); meta-analysis of the studies using blind method showed that the efficacy rate of acupuncture group was 3.01 times that of control group with no heterogeneity (RR = 3.01, 95% CI: 1.95 4.65, Z = 4.97, and P < 0.00001). Only 13 studies mentioned the safety evaluation. CONCLUSION: The result showed that the acupuncture group was better than control group in terms of efficacy rate of dysphagia after stroke. And the combining result of those researches using blind method was more strong in proof. Strict evaluation standard and high-quality RCT design are necessary for further exploration.  
  Address Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Airport Road, Baiyun District, Guangdong, Guangzhou 510006, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Deglutition Disorders
  Disease Category Stroke OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28852414; PMCID:PMC5568619 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2412  
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Author Chien, T.-J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Liu, C.-Y.; Fang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Climacteric; Menopause; Hot Flushes; Women's Health; Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Acupuncture  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.  
  Address Medical Library, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Menopause
  Disease Category Climacteric OCSI Score  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2413  
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Author Zhang, Y.-J.; Cao, H.-J.; Li, X.-L.; Yang, X.-Y.; Lai, B.-Y.; Yang, G.-Y.; Liu, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cupping therapy versus acupuncture for pain-related conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and trial sequential analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Chinese Medicine Abbreviated Journal Chin Med  
  Volume 12 Issue 21 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic review; Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Neuralgia; Acupuncture; Cupping  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Both cupping therapy and acupuncture have been used in China for a long time, and their target indications are pain-related conditions. There is no systematic review comparing the effectiveness of these two therapies. OBJECTIVES: To compare the beneficial effectiveness and safety between cupping therapy and acupuncture for pain-related conditions to provide evidence for clinical practice. METHODS: Protocol of this review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016050986). We conducted literature search from six electronic databases until 31st March 2017. We included randomized trials comparing cupping therapy with acupuncture on pain-related conditions. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated by risk of bias tool. Mean difference, risk ratio, risk difference and their 95% confidence interval were used to report the estimate effect of the pooled results through meta-analysis or the results from each individual study. Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was applied to adjust random errors and calculate the sample size. RESULTS: Twenty-three randomized trials with 2845 participants were included covering 12 pain-related conditions. All included studies were of poor methodological quality. Three meta-analyses were conducted, which showed similar clinical beneficial effects of cupping therapy and acupuncture for the rate of symptom improvement in cervical spondylosis (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.26; n = 646), lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22; n = 102) and scapulohumeral periarthritis (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51; n = 208). Results from other outcomes (such as visual analogue and numerical rating scale) in each study also showed no statistical significant difference between these two therapies for all included pain-related conditions. The results of TSA for cervical spondylosis demonstrated that the current available data have not reached a powerful conclusion. No serious adverse events related to cupping therapy or acupuncture was found in included studies. CONCLUSION: Cupping therapy and acupuncture are potentially safe, and they have similar effectiveness in relieving pain. However, further rigorous studies investigating relevant pain-related conditions are warranted to establish comparative effectiveness analysis between these two therapies. Cost-effectiveness studies should be considered in the future studies to establish evidence for decision-making in clinical practice.  
  Address Centre for Evidence?Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments (down)  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Pain
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28770000; PMCID:PMC5525375 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2414  
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