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Author Tasoglu, O.; Sahin Onat, S.; Boluk, H.; Tasoglu, I.; Ozgirgin, N. url  openurl
  Title Comparision of two different dry-needling techniques in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome Type of Study RCT
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Agri : Agri (Algoloji) Dernegi'nin Yayin Organidir = The Journal of the Turkish Society of Algology Abbreviated Journal Agri  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 9-16  
  Keywords AcuTrials; RCT; Dry Needling with Non-Acupuncture Needle; Pain; Myofascial Pain Syndromes; Acu Versus CAM Control; CAM Control; Dry-Needling; Peppering; Individualized Acupuncture Protocol; Symptom-Based Point Selection; Restricted Modalities, Acupuncture Only  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of two different dry needling (DN) techniques (deep dry needling & peppering) in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). METHODS: Seventy-two patients, who were diagnosed as MPS at our outpatient clinic were randomly assigned into two groups as deep dry needling (DDN) and peppering. All patients were evaluated four times as: before the treatment and 1-5-12 weeks after the completion of treatment protocol. In each evaluation, Visual analogue scale (VAS), Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale (NEADLS), Beck depression inventory (BDI) scores were recorded. Additionally, all patients were evaluated for the pain felt during the procedure and side effect profile. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients from DDN group and twenty-eight patients from peppering group accomplished the follow-up period. Both DDN and peppering seem to be effective for relieving pain and depressive symptoms and improving functionality compared to baseline when evaluated on the 1st, 5th and 12th weeks. On the other hand the intergroup analyses showed no significant differences between DDN and peppering groups. The only significant difference between the groups is the lesser pain felt during the procedure in the DDN group. CONCLUSION: Both DDN and peppering are effective in MPS and the effects last up to 12 weeks. Also the adverse event profiles of the two techniques are similar. On the other hand, DDN is a painless procedure.  
  Address Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara Physcial Medicine and Rehabiliation Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.humaboluk@gmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments 3  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency 1/WK Number of Participants 72  
  Time in Treatment 3 Weeks Condition Myofascial Pain Syndromes
  Disease Category Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28467572 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2177  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2454  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2495  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2536  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2577  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2663  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2704  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2782  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2823  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2864  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2946  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chou, R.; Deyo, R.; Friedly, J.; Skelly, A.; Hashimoto, R.; Weimer, M.; Fu, R.; Dana, T.; Kraegel, P.; Griffin, J.; Grusing, S.; Brodt, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nonpharmacologic Therapies for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review for an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume 166 Issue 7 Pages 493-505  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Disorders; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. Study Selection: Randomized trials of 9 nonpharmacologic options versus sham treatment, wait list, or usual care, or of 1 nonpharmacologic option versus another. Data Extraction: One investigator abstracted data, and a second checked abstractions for accuracy; 2 investigators independently assessed study quality. Data Synthesis: The number of trials evaluating nonpharmacologic therapies ranged from 2 (tai chi) to 121 (exercise). New evidence indicates that tai chi (strength of evidence [SOE], low) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (SOE, moderate) are effective for chronic low back pain and strengthens previous findings regarding the effectiveness of yoga (SOE, moderate). Evidence continues to support the effectiveness of exercise, psychological therapies, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, spinal manipulation, massage, and acupuncture for chronic low back pain (SOE, low to moderate). Limited evidence shows that acupuncture is modestly effective for acute low back pain (SOE, low). The magnitude of pain benefits was small to moderate and generally short term; effects on function generally were smaller than effects on pain. Limitation: Qualitatively synthesized new trials with prior meta-analyses, restricted to English-language studies; heterogeneity in treatment techniques; and inability to exclude placebo effects. Conclusion: Several nonpharmacologic therapies for primarily chronic low back pain are associated with small to moderate, usually short-term effects on pain; findings include new evidence on mind-body interventions. Primary Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (PROSPERO: CRD42014014735).  
  Address From Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, and University of Washington, Seattle, and Spectrum Research, Tacoma, Washington  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28192793 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2181  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andronis, L.; Kinghorn, P.; Qiao, S.; Whitehurst, D.G.T.; Durrell, S.; McLeod, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain: a Systematic Literature Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Applied Health Economics and Health Policy Abbreviated Journal Appl Health Econ Health Policy  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 173-201  
  Keywords Cost-Benefit Analysis; Exercise Therapy/economics; Health Care Costs; Humans; Low Back Pain/*economics/therapy; Patient Education as Topic/economics; Physical Therapy Modalities/economics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem, having a substantial effect on peoples' quality of life and placing a significant economic burden on healthcare systems and, more broadly, societies. Many interventions to alleviate LBP are available but their cost effectiveness is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To identify, document and appraise studies reporting on the cost effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment options for LBP. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database), 'similar article' searches and reference list scanning. Study selection was carried out by three assessors, independently. Study quality was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist. Data were extracted using customized extraction forms. RESULTS: Thirty-three studies were identified. Study interventions were categorised as: (1) combined physical exercise and psychological therapy, (2) physical exercise therapy only, (3) information and education, and (4) manual therapy. Interventions assessed within each category varied in terms of their components and delivery. In general, combined physical and psychological treatments, information and education interventions, and manual therapies appeared to be cost effective when compared with the study-specific comparators. There is inconsistent evidence around the cost effectiveness of physical exercise programmes as a whole, with yoga, but not group exercise, being cost effective. CONCLUSIONS: The identified evidence suggests that combined physical and psychological treatments, medical yoga, information and education programmes, spinal manipulation and acupuncture are likely to be cost-effective options for LBP.  
  Address Health Economics Unit, Public Health Building, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27550240 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2183  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, Y.; Xia, X.-R.; Ochin, H.; Huang, C.; Gao, C.; Gao, L.; Cui, Y.-G.; Liu, J.-Y.; Meng, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gynecol Obstet  
  Volume 295 Issue 3 Pages 543-558  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Clinical pregnancy rate; In vitro fertilization  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Controversial results have been reported concerning the effect of acupuncture on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. The current review was conducted to systematically review published studies of the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. METHODS: Women undergoing IVF in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were evaluated for the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. The treatment groups involved traditional, electrical, laser, auricular, and other acupuncture techniques. The control groups consisted of no, sham, and placebo acupuncture. The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched. The pregnancy outcomes data are expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on a fixed model or random model depending on the heterogeneity determined by the Q test and I2 statistic. The major outcomes were biochemical pregnancy rate (BPR), clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), and ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR). Heterogeneity of the therapeutic effect was evaluated by a forest plot analysis, and publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot analysis. RESULTS: Thirty trials (a total of 6344 participants) were included in this review. CPR data showed a significant difference between the acupuncture and control groups (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.50, p = 0.01), but there was significant statistical heterogeneity among the studies (p = 0.0002). When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area trials with a sensitivity analysis, the results significantly benefited the CPR in Asian group (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.20, p = 0.03). Based on the area subgroup analysis, we found that in the Asian group, the IVF outcomes from the EA groups were all significantly higher than those from the control groups (CPR: OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.72, p = 0.005; BPR: OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02, p = 0.02; LBR: OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.44-3.88, p = 0.0007; OPR: OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.64, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, compared with other acupuncture time, the IVF outcome results were significantly superior in the acupuncture group when acupuncture was conducted during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) (CPR: OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.27-2.29, p = 0.0004; LBR: OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.54-3.78, p = 0.0001; BPR: OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02-2.20, p = 0.04; OPR: OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.06-3.34, p = 0.03). However, when acupuncture was conducted at the time of embryo transfer, the BPR and OPR from the acupuncture groups were significantly lower than those of the controls in the Asian group (BPR: OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.48-0.92, p = 0.01; OPR: OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Based on an analysis of the studies, acupuncture improves the CPR among women undergoing IVF. When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area patients, compared with traditional acupuncture and other methods, electrical acupuncture yielded better IVF outcomes. Optimal positive effects could be expected using acupuncture in IVF during COH, especially in Asian area. However, as a limitation of this review, most of the included studies did not mention the number of embryos transferred.  
  Address The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Clinical Center of Reproductive Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. ctmengyan@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27995371 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2184  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electro-acupuncture for post-stroke spasticity: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords acupuncture; meta-analysis; muscle spasticity; spasticity; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and AMED) and four Chinese databases (CBM, CNKI, CQVIP and Wanfang) were searched from their inception to September 2016. DATA SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electro-acupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function and activity of daily living were extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials met the search criteria and were included involving 1,425 participants. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in upper limb measured by MAS (SMD: -0.57[-0.84, -0.29]) and improve overall motor function measured by FMA (MD: 10.60[8.67, 12.53]) were significant. It was also found that for spasticity in lower limb, lower-limb motor function and activity of daily living, significant add-on effects of EA were also shown (SMD: -0.88[-1.42, -0.35], MD:4.42[0.06, 8.78] and MD: 6.85[3.64, 10.05] respectively), though with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA was received. CONCLUSIONS: Electro-acupuncture combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in upper and lower limb and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activity of daily living for spasticity patients within 180 days post stroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of electro-acupuncture, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for post-stroke spasticity incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2185  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, L.; Huang, Q.-M.; Liu, Q.-G.; Thitham, N.; Li, L.-H.; Ma, Y.-T.; Zhao, J.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Dry Needling in the Management of Myofascial Trigger Points Associated With Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-11  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Myofascial Trigger Point; Dry Needling, With Non-Acupuncture Needle  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the current evidence of the effectiveness of dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) associated with low back pain (LBP). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched until January 2017. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that used dry needling as the main treatment and included participants diagnosed with LBP with the presence of MTrPs were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently screened articles, scored methodologic quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and functional disability at postintervention and follow-up. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 11 RCTs involving 802 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggested that compared with other treatments, dry needling of MTrPs was more effective in alleviating the intensity of LBP (standardized mean difference [SMD], -1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.77 to -0.36; P=.003) and functional disability (SMD, -0.76; 95% CI, -1.46 to -0.06; P=.03); however, the significant effects of dry needling plus other treatments on pain intensity could be superior to dry needling alone for LBP at postintervention (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P<.00001). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate evidence showed that dry needling of MTrPs, especially if associated with other therapies, could be recommended to relieve the intensity of LBP at postintervention; however, the clinical superiority of dry needling in improving functional disability and its follow-up effects still remains unclear.  
  Address Department of Sport Medicine and the Center of Rehabilitation, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28690077 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2461  
Permanent link to this record
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