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  Records Links
Author Yeh, M.-L.; Ko, S.-H.; Wang, M.-H.; Chi, C.-C.; Chung, Y.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 930-940  
  Keywords Acupressure/*methods; Acupuncture Points; Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Humans; Network Meta-Analysis; Psoriasis/*therapy; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data; acupoint stimulation; acupressure; acupuncture; bloodletting; catgut embedding; network meta-analysis; pairwise meta-analysis; psoriasis; systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. METHODS: This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. RESULTS: A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.  
  Address 5 Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology , Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28628749 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2952  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2441  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2482  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2523  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2564  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2647  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2688  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2728  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2769  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2810  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2851  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Essex, H.; Parrott, S.; Atkin, K.; Ballard, K.; Bland, M.; Eldred, J.; Hewitt, C.; Hopton, A.; Keding, A.; Lansdown, H.; Richmond, S.; Tilbrook, H.; Torgerson, D.; Watt, I.; Wenham, A.; Woodman, J.; MacPherson, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) An economic evaluation of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture sessions for patients with chronic neck pain: A randomized trial (ATLAS) Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0178918  
  Keywords Acupuncture/economics/*methods; Age Factors; Chronic Pain/*therapy; *Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Humans; Male; *Movement; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/economics/*methods; Neck Pain/*therapy; Primary Health Care  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and usual care, and Alexander Technique lessons and usual care, compared with usual GP care alone for chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: An economic evaluation was undertaken alongside the ATLAS trial, taking both NHS and wider societal viewpoints. Participants were offered up to twelve acupuncture sessions or twenty Alexander lessons (equivalent overall contact time). Costs were in pounds sterling. Effectiveness was measured using the generic EQ-5D to calculate quality adjusted life years (QALYs), as well as using a specific neck pain measure-the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). RESULTS: In the base case analysis, incremental QALY gains were 0.032 and 0.025 in the acupuncture and Alexander groups, respectively, in comparison to usual GP care, indicating moderate health benefits for both interventions. Incremental costs were pound451 for acupuncture and pound667 for Alexander, mainly driven by intervention costs. Acupuncture was likely to be cost-effective (ICER = pound18,767/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI pound4,426 to pound74,562) and was robust to most sensitivity analyses. Alexander lessons were not cost-effective at the lower NICE threshold of pound20,000/QALY ( pound25,101/QALY bootstrapped 95% CI – pound150,208 to pound248,697) but may be at pound30,000/QALY, however, there was considerable statistical uncertainty in all tested scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison with usual care, acupuncture is likely to be cost-effective for chronic neck pain, whereas, largely due to higher intervention costs, Alexander lessons are unlikely to be cost-effective. However, there were high levels of missing data and further research is needed to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of these interventions.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29211741; PMCID:PMC5718562 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2933  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2439  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2480  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2521  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2562  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2603  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abo Almaali, H.M.M.; Gelewkhan, A.; Mahdi, Z.A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Analysis of Evidence-Based Autism Symptoms Enhancement by Acupuncture Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies Abbreviated Journal J Acupunct Meridian Stud  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages 375-384  
  Keywords acupuncture; autism; clinical trials; meta-analysis  
  Abstract Autism is considered as a complex developmental disability that appears during the first two years of life. It is considered as a neurological disorder that affects brain function leading to impaired development in social interaction and communication skills. Some clinical trials demonstrated that certain acupuncture points play relatively significant role in improving both signs and symptoms of this disease. Owing to limited information available about acupuncture point's combination and protocols, the present study aimed to explore the most frequently used acupuncture points and their channels for children with autism. Thirteen articles about autism enhancement were selected from 2007 to 2015. Acupoints and their channels used in these articles were analyzed according to usage frequencies. The present study identified the following main channels that contribute to autism symptoms enhancement along with the corresponding points' frequencies: Governing Vessel channel (12), Gall bladder channel (9), Kidney channel (8), Pericardium channel (7), Extra points channel (7), Liver channel (7), Heart channel (6), Conception vessel channel (6), and Bladder channel (6). On the other hand, the frequency of each corresponding acupuncture points are EX-HN1 (5), GV-17 (4), PC-6 (4), LR-3 (3), KI-3 (3), HT-7 (3), Lu-9 (3), GV-20 (2), GV-24 (2), GV-24.5 (2), GB-13(2), GB-19 (2), KI-4 (2), LR-4 (2), ST-36 (2), SP-3 (2), SP-6 (2). In conclusion, the consensus is that both channels and points may have an important role in autism symptoms enhancement. Based on the present study, the specific channels and points selection and stimulation types need further investigation through clinical trials.  
  Address Ahl-Albait University, College of Pharmacy, Kerbala, Iraq  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29275793 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2655  
Permanent link to this record
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