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Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2704  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2782  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2823  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2864  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, T.; Yu, J.-N.; Cao, B.-Y.; Peng, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-P.; Zhang, L. url  openurl
  Title (up) Acupuncture for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Altern Ther Health Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Context * Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is one of the most common complaints among young women. Acupuncture has been widely applied as a therapeutic modality in China and abroad for PD; however, the evidence for its benefits is still not convincing. Objective * The study intended to conduct a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of acupuncture in treating PD. Design * The research team retrieved reports for RCTs published in 7 databases from their inception to March 2016, with no language restrictions: PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical database, and the Wanfang database. Setting * The study was conducted at the Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China). Participants * Participants in the reviewed studies were women aged 14 to 49 y who had received a diagnosis of PD in the absence of any visible pelvic pathology. Interventions * The types of acupuncture included traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, ear acupuncture, scalp acupuncture, superficial acupuncture, electrosuperficial acupuncture, wrist-ankle acupuncture, and abdominal acupuncture. Outcome Measures * The primary outcome was pain relief measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), a verbal rating scale (VRS), or a numerical rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes included (1) overall improvement as measured by the short-form McGill pain questionnaire or symptom scale based on the Clinical Study Guideline for New Developed Chinese Medicine, (2) menstrual distress as measured by the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, (3) quality of life as measured by a validated scale (eg, the short-form 36), and (4) adverse effects. Results * Twenty-three trials enrolling a total of 2770 patients were included in the review. Overall, most trials were of poor quality. Among the trials, only 6 were evaluated as having a low risk of bias, 3 of which indicated that acupuncture was statistically more effective than sham acupuncture-mean difference (MD), -3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.27 to -1.75; P < .0001; I(2), 0%-or no treatment-MD, -21.95; 95% CI, -25.45 to -18.45; P < .00001; I(2), 0%-on the VAS (0 to 100 mm). Acupuncture also showed superiority to the control arms on the VRS, the NRS, and the McGill pain questionnaire, but those findings had been influenced by methodological flaws. Conclusions * The available evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective for PD and justifies future high-quality studies.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29112942 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2946  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nielsen, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the Prevention of Tension-Type Headache (2016) Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Explore (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Explore (NY)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, et al. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache.Cochrane Database Syst Rev2016, Issue 48. Art No.: CD007587. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007587.pub2. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is often used for prevention of tension-type headache but its effectiveness is still controversial. This is an update of our Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2009 of The Cochrane Library. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether acupuncture is (a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; (b) more effective than “sham” (placebo) acupuncture; and (c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and AMED to 19 January 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to 10 February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least eight weeks, which compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another prophylactic intervention in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results; and assessed study risk of bias and the quality of the acupuncture intervention. The main efficacy outcome measure was response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency) after completion of treatment (three to four months after randomization). To assess safety/acceptability we extracted the number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and the number of participants reporting adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials (11 included in the previous version and one newly identified) with 2349 participants (median = 56, range: 10-1265) met the inclusion criteria. Acupuncture was compared with routine care or treatment of acute headaches only in two large trials (1265 and 207 participants), but they had quite different baseline headache frequency and management in the control groups. Neither trial was blinded but trial quality was otherwise high (low risk of bias). While effect size estimates of the two trials differed considerably, the proportion of participants experiencing at least 50% reduction of headache frequency was much higher in groups receiving acupuncture than in control groups (moderate quality evidence; trial 1: 302/629 (48%) versus 121/636 (19%); risk ratio (RR) = 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1-3.0; trial 2: 60/132 (45%) versus 3/75 (4%); RR = 11; 95% CI: 3.7-35). Long-term effects (beyond four months) were not investigated. Acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture in seven trials of moderate- to high-quality (low risk of bias); five large studies provided data for one or more meta-analyses. Among participants receiving acupuncture, 205 of 391 (51%) had at least 50% reduction of headache frequency compared to 133 of 312 (43%) in the sham group after treatment (RR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.09-1.5; four trials; moderate quality evidence). Results six months after randomization were similar. Withdrawals were low: 1 of 420 participants receiving acupuncture dropped out due to adverse effects and 0 of 343 receiving sham (six trials; low quality evidence). Three trials reported the number of participants reporting adverse effects: 29 of 174 (17%) with acupuncture versus 12 of 103 with sham (12%; odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.60-2.7; low quality evidence). Acupuncture was compared with physiotherapy, massage, or exercise in four trials of low to moderate quality (high risk of bias); study findings were inadequately reported. No trial found a significant superiority of acupuncture and for some outcomes the results slightly favored the comparison therapy. None of these trials reported the number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects or the number of participants reporting adverse effects. Overall, the quality of the evidence assessed using GRADE was moderate or low, downgraded mainly due to a lack of blinding and variable effect sizes. AUTHORS CONCLUSIONS: The available results suggest that acupuncture is effective for treating frequent episodic or chronic tension-type headaches, but further trials-particularly comparing acupuncture with other treatment options-are needed.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28392178 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2204  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grant, S.; Colaiaco, B.; Motala, A.; Shanman, R.; Sorbero, M.; Hempel, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the Treatment of Adults with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) Abbreviated Journal J Trauma Dissociation  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Alternative medicine; complementary medicine; meta-analysis; posttraumatic stress disorder; systematic review  
  Abstract Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet its clinical effects are unclear. This review aims to estimate effects of acupuncture on PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep quality for adults with PTSD. We searched 10 databases in January 2016 to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We performed random effects meta-analyses and examined quality of the body of evidence (QoE) using the GRADE approach to rate confidence in meta-analytic effect estimates. Seven RCTs with 709 participants met inclusion criteria. We identified very low QoE indicating significant differences favoring acupuncture (versus any comparator) at post-intervention on PTSD symptoms (standardized mean difference [SMD] = -0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.59, -0.01], 6 RCTs), and low QoE at longer follow-up on PTSD (SMD = -0.46, 95% CI [-0.85, -0.06], 4 RCTs) and depressive symptoms (SMD = -0.56; 95% CI [-0.88, -0.23], 4 RCTs). No significant differences were observed between acupuncture and comparators at post-intervention for depressive symptoms (SMD = -0.58, 95% CI [-1.18, 0.01], 6 RCTs, very low QoE), anxiety symptoms (SMD = -0.82, 95% CI [-2.16, 0.53], 4 RCTs, very low QoE), and sleep quality (SMD = -0.46, 95% CI [-3.95, 3.03], 2 RCTs, low QoE). Safety data (7 RCTs) suggest little risk of serious adverse events, though some participants experienced minor/moderate pain, superficial bleeding, and hematoma at needle insertion sites. To increase confidence in findings, sufficiently powered replication trials are needed that measure all relevant clinical outcomes and dedicate study resources to minimizing participant attrition.  
  Address a RAND Corporation , Santa Monica , California , USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28151093 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2214  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yue, J.; Liu, M.; Li, J.; Wang, Y.; Hung, E.-S.; Tong, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Golianu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of hiccups following stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 2-8  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Hiccup/etiology/*therapy; Humans; Stroke/*complications; Treatment Outcome; *Acupuncture; *Stroke; *Systematic Reviews  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for hiccups following stroke. METHODS: Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and four Chinese medical databases were searched from their inception to 1 June 2015. The dataset included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared acupuncture as an adjunct to medical treatment (effectiveness) or acupuncture versus medical treatment (comparative effectiveness) in stroke patients with hiccups. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. RESULTS: Out of 436 potentially relevant studies, five met the inclusion criteria. When acupuncture was compared with other interventions (as sole or adjunctive treatment), meta-analysis revealed a significant difference in favour of cessation of hiccups within a specified time period (CHWST) following intervention when used as an adjunct (risk ratio (RR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.19, I2=0%), but not when used alone (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.47, I2=65%, ie, high heterogeneity). No safety information was reported in these studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for patients suffering from hiccups following stroke when used as an adjunct to medical treatment. However, due to the limited number of RCTs and poor methodology quality, we cannot reach a definitive conclusion, hence further large, rigorously designed trials are needed.  
  Address Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27286862 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2459  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2500  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2541  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2582  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2623  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2659  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2700  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2746  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2787  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, R.-Q.; Tan, J.; Li, F.-Y.; Ma, Y.-H.; Han, L.-X.; Yang, X.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Acupuncture for the treatment of obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Postgraduate Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Postgrad Med J  
  Volume 93 Issue 1106 Pages 743-751  
  Keywords Meta-analysis; Rct; acupuncture; obesity; treatment  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Meta-analysis was used to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for simple obesity and to provide evidence-based medical data for treating obesity with acupuncture. METHODS: A comprehensive search of studies on MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Chinese databases (Wan Fang,CNKI and VIP) from 1 January 1915 through 30 November 2015 (MEDLINE search updated through 31 December 2015) was performed. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that used acupuncture and sham acupuncture to treat simple obesity. The effect of acupuncture on simple obesity was measured using body mass index (BMI), body fat mass (BFM), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and body weight (BW). The Jadad scale was used to assess methodological quality. The random effects model was used in the pooled analysis to adjust for the heterogeneity of the included studies, and funnel plots were used to examine publication bias. The differences between treatment groups were reported as mean differences (MD). RESULTS: Eleven RCTs were selected after all relevant literature from the electronic databases had been screened. There were 338 and 305 participants in the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups, respectively. Auricular and electro acupuncture were both able to reduce BMI in obese patients (MD 0.47 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58, p<0.001; MD 0.50 kg/m(2), 95% CI 0.38 to 0.62, p<0.001). BFM change after acupuncture treatment compared with sham treatment was statistically significant (MD 0.66 kg, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.80, p<0.001). There were also significant differences in WC and HC between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MDwc2.02 cm, 95% CI 0.21 to 3.83, p=0.03; MDHC2.74 cm, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.27, p=0.0004). BW was not statistically significantly different between the acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (MD 0.60 kg, 95% CI -0.20 to 1.39, p=0.14). Begg's test and funnel plots showed that the potential publication bias of the included studies was very slight (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture for simple obesity appeared to be an effective treatment, but more studies on the safety of acupuncture used to treat simple obesity are required.  
  Address Institute of Endemic Diseases of School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases of the National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28689171 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2828  
Permanent link to this record
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