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Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2764  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2799  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2805  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2840  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2846  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2887  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.-H.; Dong, G.-T.; Ye, Y.; Zheng, J.-B.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, H.-S.; Wang, X.-Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Early Recovery of Bowel Function in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 2504021  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy to reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI) and to enhance bowel function in cancer patients. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases for studies published from inception until January 2017 was carried out from six databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of acupuncture and acupressure for POI and bowel function in cancer patients were identified. Outcomes were extracted from each study and pooled to determine the risk ratio and standardized mean difference. Results: 10 RCTs involving 776 cancer patients were included. Compared with control groups (no acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and other active therapies), acupuncture was associated with shorter time to first flatus and time to first defecation. A subgroup analysis revealed that manual acupuncture was more effective on the time to first flatus and the time to first defecation; electroacupuncture was better in reducing the length of hospital stay. Compared with control groups (sham or no acupressure), acupressure was associated with shorter time to first flatus. However, GRADE approach indicated a low quality of evidence. Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Oncology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29422935; PMCID:PMC5750515 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2922  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yu, S.-Y.; Lv, Z.-T.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, S.; Wu, X.; Hu, Y.-P.; Zeng, F.; Liang, F.-R.; Yang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture is Beneficial for Primary Dysmenorrhea: The Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM Abbreviated Journal Evid Based Complement Alternat Med  
  Volume (down) 2017 Issue Pages 1791258  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Electroacupuncture (EA) is considered to be a promising alternative therapy to relieve the menstrual pain for primary dysmenorrhea (PD), but the conclusion is controversial. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis specifically to evaluate the clinical efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of EA in patients with PD. PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of EA for PD. The outcome measurements included visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), COX retrospective symptom scale (RSS), and the curative rate. Nine RCTs with high risk of bias were included for meta-analysis. The combined VAS 30 minutes after the completion of intervention favoured EA at SP6 when compared with EA at GB39, nonacupoints, and waiting-list groups. EA was superior to pharmacological treatment when the treatment duration lasted for three menstrual cycles, evidenced by significantly higher curative rate. No statistically significant differences between EA at SP6 and control groups were found regarding the VRS, RSS-COX1, and RSS-COX2. The findings of our study suggested that EA can provide considerable immediate analgesia effect for PD. Additional studies with rigorous design and larger sample sizes are needed.  
  Address The 3rd Teaching Hospital, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29358960; PMCID:PMC5735637 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2928  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, Y.; Xia, X.-R.; Ochin, H.; Huang, C.; Gao, C.; Gao, L.; Cui, Y.-G.; Liu, J.-Y.; Meng, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on the outcomes of in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gynecol Obstet  
  Volume (down) 295 Issue 3 Pages 543-558  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Clinical pregnancy rate; In vitro fertilization  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Controversial results have been reported concerning the effect of acupuncture on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. The current review was conducted to systematically review published studies of the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. METHODS: Women undergoing IVF in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were evaluated for the effects of acupuncture on IVF outcomes. The treatment groups involved traditional, electrical, laser, auricular, and other acupuncture techniques. The control groups consisted of no, sham, and placebo acupuncture. The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched. The pregnancy outcomes data are expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on a fixed model or random model depending on the heterogeneity determined by the Q test and I2 statistic. The major outcomes were biochemical pregnancy rate (BPR), clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), live birth rate (LBR), and ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR). Heterogeneity of the therapeutic effect was evaluated by a forest plot analysis, and publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot analysis. RESULTS: Thirty trials (a total of 6344 participants) were included in this review. CPR data showed a significant difference between the acupuncture and control groups (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.50, p = 0.01), but there was significant statistical heterogeneity among the studies (p = 0.0002). When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area trials with a sensitivity analysis, the results significantly benefited the CPR in Asian group (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.20, p = 0.03). Based on the area subgroup analysis, we found that in the Asian group, the IVF outcomes from the EA groups were all significantly higher than those from the control groups (CPR: OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.20-2.72, p = 0.005; BPR: OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02, p = 0.02; LBR: OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.44-3.88, p = 0.0007; OPR: OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.64, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, compared with other acupuncture time, the IVF outcome results were significantly superior in the acupuncture group when acupuncture was conducted during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) (CPR: OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.27-2.29, p = 0.0004; LBR: OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.54-3.78, p = 0.0001; BPR: OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02-2.20, p = 0.04; OPR: OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.06-3.34, p = 0.03). However, when acupuncture was conducted at the time of embryo transfer, the BPR and OPR from the acupuncture groups were significantly lower than those of the controls in the Asian group (BPR: OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.48-0.92, p = 0.01; OPR: OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Based on an analysis of the studies, acupuncture improves the CPR among women undergoing IVF. When the studies were restricted to Asian or non-Asian area patients, compared with traditional acupuncture and other methods, electrical acupuncture yielded better IVF outcomes. Optimal positive effects could be expected using acupuncture in IVF during COH, especially in Asian area. However, as a limitation of this review, most of the included studies did not mention the number of embryos transferred.  
  Address The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Clinical Center of Reproductive Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. ctmengyan@hotmail.com  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27995371 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2184  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cohen, M.M.; Smit, D.V.; Andrianopoulos, N.; Ben-Meir, M.; Taylor, D.M.D.; Parker, S.J.; Xue, C.C.; Cameron, P.A. url  openurl
  Title Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication The Medical Journal of Australia Abbreviated Journal Med J Aust  
  Volume (down) 206 Issue 11 Pages 494-499  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Adult; Analgesia/*methods; Ankle Injuries/therapy; Emergency Medical Services/*methods; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/therapy; Male; Middle Aged; Migraine Disorders/therapy; Pain Measurement; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. DESIGN: A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. RESULTS: 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.  
  Address The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28918732 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chou, R.; Deyo, R.; Friedly, J.; Skelly, A.; Hashimoto, R.; Weimer, M.; Fu, R.; Dana, T.; Kraegel, P.; Griffin, J.; Grusing, S.; Brodt, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nonpharmacologic Therapies for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review for an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Annals of Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Intern Med  
  Volume (down) 166 Issue 7 Pages 493-505  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Back Pain; Low Back Pain; Musculoskeletal Disorders; Acupuncture  
  Abstract Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. Study Selection: Randomized trials of 9 nonpharmacologic options versus sham treatment, wait list, or usual care, or of 1 nonpharmacologic option versus another. Data Extraction: One investigator abstracted data, and a second checked abstractions for accuracy; 2 investigators independently assessed study quality. Data Synthesis: The number of trials evaluating nonpharmacologic therapies ranged from 2 (tai chi) to 121 (exercise). New evidence indicates that tai chi (strength of evidence [SOE], low) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (SOE, moderate) are effective for chronic low back pain and strengthens previous findings regarding the effectiveness of yoga (SOE, moderate). Evidence continues to support the effectiveness of exercise, psychological therapies, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, spinal manipulation, massage, and acupuncture for chronic low back pain (SOE, low to moderate). Limited evidence shows that acupuncture is modestly effective for acute low back pain (SOE, low). The magnitude of pain benefits was small to moderate and generally short term; effects on function generally were smaller than effects on pain. Limitation: Qualitatively synthesized new trials with prior meta-analyses, restricted to English-language studies; heterogeneity in treatment techniques; and inability to exclude placebo effects. Conclusion: Several nonpharmacologic therapies for primarily chronic low back pain are associated with small to moderate, usually short-term effects on pain; findings include new evidence on mind-body interventions. Primary Funding Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (PROSPERO: CRD42014014735).  
  Address From Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, and University of Washington, Seattle, and Spectrum Research, Tacoma, Washington  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Low Back Pain
  Disease Category Back Pain OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28192793 Approved yes  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2181  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author MacPherson, H.; Vertosick, E.A.; Foster, N.E.; Lewith, G.; Linde, K.; Sherman, K.J.; Witt, C.M.; Vickers, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The persistence of the effects of acupuncture after a course of treatment: a meta-analysis of patients with chronic pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume (down) 158 Issue 5 Pages 784-793  
  Keywords Acupuncture Therapy/*methods; Animals; Chronic Pain/*therapy; Humans  
  Abstract There is uncertainty regarding how long the effects of acupuncture treatment persist after a course of treatment. We aimed to determine the trajectory of pain scores over time after acupuncture, using a large individual patient data set from high-quality randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain. The available individual patient data set included 29 trials and 17,922 patients. The chronic pain conditions included musculoskeletal pain (low back, neck, and shoulder), osteoarthritis of the knee, and headache/migraine. We used meta-analytic techniques to determine the trajectory of posttreatment pain scores. Data on longer term follow-up were available for 20 trials, including 6376 patients. In trials comparing acupuncture to no acupuncture control (wait-list, usual care, etc), effect sizes diminished by a nonsignificant 0.011 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: -0.014 to 0.037, P = 0.4) after treatment ended. The central estimate suggests that approximately 90% of the benefit of acupuncture relative to controls would be sustained at 12 months. For trials comparing acupuncture to sham, we observed a reduction in effect size of 0.025 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: 0.000-0.050, P = 0.050), suggesting approximately a 50% diminution at 12 months. The effects of a course of acupuncture treatment for patients with chronic pain do not seem to decrease importantly over 12 months. Patients can generally be reassured that treatment effects persist. Studies of the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture should take our findings into account when considering the time horizon of acupuncture effects. Further research should measure longer term outcomes of acupuncture.  
  Address aDepartment of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom bDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA cResearch Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom dDepartment of Primary Care, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom eInstitute of General Practice, Technische Universitat Munchen, Munchen, Germany fGroup Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA gInstitute for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland hInstitute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite-Universitatsmedizin, Berlin, Germany iCenter for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:27764035; PMCID:PMC5393924 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2220  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xie, X.-C.; Cao, Y.-Q.; Gao, Q.; Wang, C.; Li, M.; Wei, S.-G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture Improves Intestinal Absorption of Iron in Iron-deficient Obese Patients: A Randomized Controlled Preliminary Trial Type of Study
  Year 2017 Publication Chinese Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Chin Med J (Engl)  
  Volume (down) 130 Issue 5 Pages 508-515  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy; Adult; Female; Hepcidins/blood; Humans; Intestinal Absorption/*physiology; Iron/*deficiency/*metabolism; Leptin/blood; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity/blood/*metabolism/*therapy; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Obesity has an adverse effect on iron status. Hepcidin-mediated inhibition of iron absorption in the duodenum is a potential mechanism. Iron-deficient obese patients have diminished response to oral iron therapy. This study was designed to assess whether acupuncture could promote the efficacy of oral iron supplementation for the treatment of obesity-related iron deficiency (ID). METHODS: Sixty ID or ID anemia (IDA) patients with obesity were screened at Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine and were randomly allocated to receive either oral iron replacement allied with acupuncture weight loss treatment (acupuncture group, n = 30) or oral iron combined with sham-acupuncture treatment (control group, n = 30). Anthropometric parameters were measured and blood samples were tested pre- and post-treatment. Differences in the treatment outcomes of ID/IDA were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: After 8 weeks of acupuncture treatment, there was a significant decrease in body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip circumference ratio of patients in the acupuncture group, while no significant changes were observed in the control group. Oral iron supplementation brought more obvious improvements of iron status indicators including absolute increases in serum iron (11.08 +/- 2.19 mumol/L vs. 4.43 +/- 0.47 mumol/L), transferrin saturation (11.26 +/- 1.65% vs. 1.01 +/- 0.23%), and hemoglobin (31.47 +/- 1.19 g/L vs. 21.00 +/- 2.69 g/L) in the acupuncture group than control group (all P < 0.05). Meanwhile, serum leptin (2.26 +/- 0.45 ng/ml vs. 8.13 +/- 0.55 ng/ml, P < 0.05) and hepcidin (3.52 +/- 1.23 ng/ml vs. 6.77 +/- 0.84 ng/ml, P < 0.05) concentrations declined significantly in the acupuncture group than those in the control group. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture-based weight loss can enhance the therapeutic effects of iron replacement therapy for obesity-related ID/IDA through improving intestinal iron absorption, probably by downregulating the systemic leptin-hepcidin levels.  
  Address Department of Children's and Women's Health, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28229980; PMCID:PMC5339922 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2193  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Choi, T.-Y.; Lee, M.S.; Kim, J.I.; Zaslawski, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moxibustion for the treatment of osteoarthritis: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Systematic Review
  Year 2017 Publication Maturitas Abbreviated Journal Maturitas  
  Volume (down) 100 Issue Pages 33-48  
  Keywords AcuTrials; Systematic Review; Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Pain; OA; Moxibustion; Direct Moxibustion; Indirect Moxibustion; Moxa  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to update previous reviews and examine recent evidence from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of the use of moxibustion for osteoarthritis (OA). Twelve databases were searched from inception through to September 2016 with no language limits applied. Data extraction and risk-of-bias assessments were performed by two independent reviewers. A total of 19 RCTs met all inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Three RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of sham moxibustion in patients with knee OA (KOA) and found favourable effects of moxibustion on pain reduction (n=305; SMD, -0.46; 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.06, P=0.02, I2=65%), including at follow-up (n=305; SMD, -0.36; 95% CI: -0.70 to -0.01, P=0.04, I2=54%). Eleven RCTs compared the effects of moxibustion with those of conventional oral drug therapies. Eight RCTs reported a total symptom score and the meta-analysis showed superior effects of moxibustion compared with drug therapies for this measure (n=691; SMD, -0.24; 95% CI: -0.78 to 0.29; P=0.37, I2=91%) and response rate (n=758 knees; RR, 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05-1.16, P <0.0001, I2=0%). Three RCTs found superior or equivalent effects of moxibustion on symptom score compared with intra-articular injection or topical drug therapy. The existing trial evidence is sufficiently convincing to suggest that moxibustion, compared with sham moxibustion and oral drugs, is effective for pain reduction and symptom management in KOA. The level of evidence is moderate, given the high risk of bias and small sample size.  
  Address Clinical Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition Osteoarthritis
  Disease Category Arthritis OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28539175 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2420  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2461  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2502  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2543  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2584  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, Y.; Zhang, C.S.; Liu, S.; Wen, Z.; Zhang, A.L.; Guo, X.; Lu, C.; Xue, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil  
  Volume (down) 98 Issue 12 Pages 2578-2589.e4  
  Keywords Electroacupuncture/*methods; Humans; Muscle Spasticity/*rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation/*methods; Upper Extremity; *Acupuncture; *Meta-Analysis; *Muscle spasticity; *Rehabilitation; *Stroke  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. DATA SOURCES: Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. DATA EXTRACTION: Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. DATA SYNTHESIS: In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. CONCLUSIONS: EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm the effects and safety of EA, and to explore the adequate and optimal protocol of EA for poststroke spasticity, incorporating a group of comprehensive outcome measures in different populations.  
  Address China-Australia International Research Centre for Chinese Medicine, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine (The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine), Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: charlie.xue@rmit.edu.au  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:28455191 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2625  
Permanent link to this record
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