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Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2596  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2634  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2675  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2719  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2760  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2801  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2842  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2883  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2924  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2465  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2506  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2547  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2588  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2632  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2673  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2711  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2752  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2793  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2834  
Permanent link to this record
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