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Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2434  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2475  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2516  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2557  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2598  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2637  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2678  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2721  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2762  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2803  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2844  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhan, J.; Pan, R.; Zhou, M.; Tan, F.; Huang, Z.; Dong, J.; Wen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for motor dysfunction in acute stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analyses Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) e017153  
  Keywords *Rct; *electroacupuncture; *motor function; *post-stroke; *systematic review  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) and/or conventional drugs (CD) for improving poststroke motor dysfunction (PSMD). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: The China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase were electronically searched from inception to December 2016. The methodological quality of the included trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Statistical analyses were performed by RevMan V.5.3 and Stata SE V.11.0. RESULTS: Nineteen trials with 1434 participants were included for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. The meta-analysis indicated that the EA group might be benefiting more than the non-EA group in terms of the changes in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 10.79, 95% CI 6.39 to 15.20, P<0.001), FMA for lower extremity (WMD: 5.16, 95% CI 3.78 to 6.54, P<0.001) and activities of daily living (standardised mean difference: 1.37, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96, P<0.001). However, there was no difference between EA and non-EA groups in terms of the effective rate (relative risk: 1.13, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.27, P=0.050). Moreover, there were not any reports of side effects due to EA combined with RT and/or CD in the included trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides new evidence for the effectiveness and safety of EA combined with RT and/or CD for PSMD. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because of methodological weakness and publication bias. Further clinical trials with a rigorous design and large sample sizes are warranted. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42016037597.  
  Address National Centre for Design Measurement and Evaluation in Clinical Research, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371267; PMCID:PMC5786119 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2926  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2428  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2469  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2510  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2592  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2633  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mo, Q.; Wang, Y.; Yu, J.; Liu, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Medicine Abbreviated Journal Medicine (Baltimore)  
  Volume 97 Issue 8 Pages (down) e9838  
  Keywords *Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects; Adult; Humans; Urinary Bladder, Overactive/drug therapy/physiopathology/*therapy; Urination; Urological Agents/therapeutic use  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients' health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. METHODS: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients' quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB.  
  Address Department of Acupuncture, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29465566 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2674  
Permanent link to this record
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