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Author Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Lee, M.S.; Wang, L.-Q.; Hay, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for depression Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages Cd004046  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is recognised as a major public health problem that has a substantial impact on individuals and on society. People with depression may consider using complementary therapies such as acupuncture, and an increasing body of research has been undertaken to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression. This is the second update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression.To determine:* Whether acupuncture is more effective than treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than control acupuncture for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than pharmacological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture plus pharmacological therapy is more effective than pharmacological therapy alone for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than psychological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Adverse effects of acupuncture compared with treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control, control acupuncture, pharmacological therapies, and psychological therapies for treatment of individuals with depression. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases to June 2016: Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR), Korean Studies Information Service System (KISS), DBPIA (Korean article database website), Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Research Information Service System (RISS), Korea Med, Korean Medical Database (KM base), and Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), as well as several Korean medical journals. SELECTION CRITERIA: Review criteria called for inclusion of all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture versus control acupuncture, no treatment, medication, other structured psychotherapies (cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychotherapy, or counselling), or standard care. Modes of treatment included acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and laser acupuncture. Participants included adult men and women with depression diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), or Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders Third Edition Revised (CCMD-3-R). If necessary, we used trial authors' definitions of depressive disorder. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcomes were reduction in the severity of depression, measured by self-rating scales or by clinician-rated scales, and improvement in depression, defined as remission versus no remission. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE method. MAIN RESULTS: This review is an update of previous versions and includes 64 studies (7104 participants). Most studies were at high risk of performance bias, at high or unclear risk of detection bias, and at low or unclear risk of selection bias, attrition bias, reporting bias, and other bias.Acupuncture versus no treatment/wait list/treatment as usualWe found low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture (manual and electro-) may moderately reduce the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.66, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.25, five trials, 488 participants). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.35 to 2.24, one trial, 302 participants; low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus control acupuncture (invasive, non-invasive sham controls)Acupuncture may be associated with a small reduction in the severity of depression of 1.69 points on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) by end of treatment (95% CI -3.33 to -0.05, 14 trials, 841 participants; low-quality evidence). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 1.63, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.86, five trials, 300 participants; moderate-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus medicationWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture may confer small benefit in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.05, 31 trials, 3127 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different classes of medications and different modes of acupuncture stimulation. Very low-quality evidence suggests lower ratings of adverse events following acupuncture compared with medication alone, as measured by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (mean difference (MD) -4.32, 95% CI -7.41 to -1.23, three trials, 481 participants).Acupuncture plus medication versus medication aloneWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture is highly beneficial in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.66, 11 trials, 775 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different modes of acupuncture stimulation. It is unclear whether differences in adverse events are associated with different modes of acupuncture (SMD -1.32, 95% CI -2.86 to 0.23, three trials, 200 participants; very low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus psychological therapyIt is unclear whether data show differences between acupuncture and psychological therapy in the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.5, 95% CI -1.33 to 0.33, two trials, 497 participants; low-quality evidence). Low-quality evidence suggests no differences between groups in rates of adverse events (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.33, one trial, 452 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in severity of depression was less when acupuncture was compared with control acupuncture than when acupuncture was compared with no treatment control, although in both cases, results were rated as providing low-quality evidence. The reduction in severity of depression with acupuncture given alone or in conjunction with medication versus medication alone is uncertain owing to the very low quality of evidence. The effect of acupuncture compared with psychological therapy is unclear. The risk of adverse events with acupuncture is also unclear, as most trials did not report adverse events adequately. Few studies included follow-up periods or assessed important outcomes such as quality of life. High-quality randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to examine the clinical efficacy and acceptability of acupuncture, as well as its effectiveness, compared with acupuncture controls, medication, or psychological therapies.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29502347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2426  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tang, S.; Mo, Z.; Zhang, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). METHODS: Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for LDH. A meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 and the evidence level was assessed using GRADE methodology. RESULTS: Thirty RCTs involving 3503 participants were included in the study. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had a higher total effective rate than lumbar traction (RR=1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15; p<0.001), ibuprofen (RR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.48; p=0.02), diclofenac sodium (RR=1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.67; p<0.001) and meloxicam (RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.31; p=0.01). Acupuncture was also better than lumbar traction (SMD -1.33, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.84; p<0.001) and diclofenac sodium (SMD -1.36, 95% CI -2.59 to -0.13; p=0.03) in terms ofvisual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and better than lumbar traction (SMD 0.96, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.45; p=0.0001) with respect toJapanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. In addition, the total effective rate in five individual trials was greater for acupuncture than for mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, ibuprofen plus fugui gutong capsule, loxoprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone and huoxue zhitong decoction, respectively. Additionally, two individual trials showed a superior effect of acupuncture in VAS scores comparedwith ibuprofen or mannitol plus dexamethasone, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture showed a more favourable effect in the treatment of LDH than lumbar traction, ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, meloxicam, mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, fugui gutong capsule plus ibuprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone, loxoprofen and huoxue zhitong decoction. However, further rigorously designed, large-scale RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29496679 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 30  
  Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2432  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chubak, B.; Doctor, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sexual Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sex Med Rev  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Chinese Herbal Drugs; Meditation; Sexual Dysfunction; Traditional Chinese Medicine; Yoga  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite the growing popularity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the Western world, biomedical students and practitioners struggle to understand TCM and how it relates to their standard diagnosis and treatment practices. AIMS: To describe the fundamentals of TCM theory and practice relevant to sexual dysfunction; to review and critique the current state of TCM research within Western biomedical literature; and to identify sites for improvement of future research and for collaborative integration of TCM and biomedicine in practice. METHODS: Information about TCM from an insider perspective was obtained from English-language textbooks and lectures intended to teach Western students its theory and practice. PubMed search using Medical Subject Heading terms for Western sexual diagnoses and TCM treatments was performed in April and October 2017 to represent the evidence for TCM in Western biomedical literature. Articles in non-English languages and without human subjects were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 27 studies were included in this review. The most commonly studied intervention was acupuncture. An equal number of studies addressed sexual dysfunction in men and women, but only women were included in studies of physically passive mindfulness meditation. RESULTS: Compared with Western biomedicine, TCM offers a more interdisciplinary and individualized approach to disease and its treatment. This embrace of individual idiosyncrasy in diagnosis and treatment presents a challenge to Western biomedical research norms that rely almost exclusively on quantitative methods that compare large and homogeneous groups with a fixed diagnosis and treatment regimen. CONCLUSION: TCM offers a very different understanding of the human body, health, and disease from Western biomedicine. There is value in the study and application of these 2 medical systems, particularly for biopsychosocial problems of sexual dysfunction. However, this must be done cautiously, with attention to appropriate study design, to avoid shallow and unscientific cultural appropriation of TCM practices. Chubak B, Doctor A. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence. Sex Med Rev 2018;X:XXX-XXX.  
  Address Wellpoints, New York, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371144 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2435  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2437  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2465  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Lee, M.S.; Wang, L.-Q.; Hay, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for depression Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages Cd004046  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is recognised as a major public health problem that has a substantial impact on individuals and on society. People with depression may consider using complementary therapies such as acupuncture, and an increasing body of research has been undertaken to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression. This is the second update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression.To determine:* Whether acupuncture is more effective than treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than control acupuncture for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than pharmacological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture plus pharmacological therapy is more effective than pharmacological therapy alone for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than psychological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Adverse effects of acupuncture compared with treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control, control acupuncture, pharmacological therapies, and psychological therapies for treatment of individuals with depression. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases to June 2016: Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR), Korean Studies Information Service System (KISS), DBPIA (Korean article database website), Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Research Information Service System (RISS), Korea Med, Korean Medical Database (KM base), and Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), as well as several Korean medical journals. SELECTION CRITERIA: Review criteria called for inclusion of all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture versus control acupuncture, no treatment, medication, other structured psychotherapies (cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychotherapy, or counselling), or standard care. Modes of treatment included acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and laser acupuncture. Participants included adult men and women with depression diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), or Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders Third Edition Revised (CCMD-3-R). If necessary, we used trial authors' definitions of depressive disorder. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcomes were reduction in the severity of depression, measured by self-rating scales or by clinician-rated scales, and improvement in depression, defined as remission versus no remission. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE method. MAIN RESULTS: This review is an update of previous versions and includes 64 studies (7104 participants). Most studies were at high risk of performance bias, at high or unclear risk of detection bias, and at low or unclear risk of selection bias, attrition bias, reporting bias, and other bias.Acupuncture versus no treatment/wait list/treatment as usualWe found low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture (manual and electro-) may moderately reduce the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.66, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.25, five trials, 488 participants). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.35 to 2.24, one trial, 302 participants; low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus control acupuncture (invasive, non-invasive sham controls)Acupuncture may be associated with a small reduction in the severity of depression of 1.69 points on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) by end of treatment (95% CI -3.33 to -0.05, 14 trials, 841 participants; low-quality evidence). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 1.63, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.86, five trials, 300 participants; moderate-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus medicationWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture may confer small benefit in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.05, 31 trials, 3127 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different classes of medications and different modes of acupuncture stimulation. Very low-quality evidence suggests lower ratings of adverse events following acupuncture compared with medication alone, as measured by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (mean difference (MD) -4.32, 95% CI -7.41 to -1.23, three trials, 481 participants).Acupuncture plus medication versus medication aloneWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture is highly beneficial in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.66, 11 trials, 775 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different modes of acupuncture stimulation. It is unclear whether differences in adverse events are associated with different modes of acupuncture (SMD -1.32, 95% CI -2.86 to 0.23, three trials, 200 participants; very low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus psychological therapyIt is unclear whether data show differences between acupuncture and psychological therapy in the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.5, 95% CI -1.33 to 0.33, two trials, 497 participants; low-quality evidence). Low-quality evidence suggests no differences between groups in rates of adverse events (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.33, one trial, 452 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in severity of depression was less when acupuncture was compared with control acupuncture than when acupuncture was compared with no treatment control, although in both cases, results were rated as providing low-quality evidence. The reduction in severity of depression with acupuncture given alone or in conjunction with medication versus medication alone is uncertain owing to the very low quality of evidence. The effect of acupuncture compared with psychological therapy is unclear. The risk of adverse events with acupuncture is also unclear, as most trials did not report adverse events adequately. Few studies included follow-up periods or assessed important outcomes such as quality of life. High-quality randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to examine the clinical efficacy and acceptability of acupuncture, as well as its effectiveness, compared with acupuncture controls, medication, or psychological therapies.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29502347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2467  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tang, S.; Mo, Z.; Zhang, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). METHODS: Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for LDH. A meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 and the evidence level was assessed using GRADE methodology. RESULTS: Thirty RCTs involving 3503 participants were included in the study. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had a higher total effective rate than lumbar traction (RR=1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15; p<0.001), ibuprofen (RR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.48; p=0.02), diclofenac sodium (RR=1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.67; p<0.001) and meloxicam (RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.31; p=0.01). Acupuncture was also better than lumbar traction (SMD -1.33, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.84; p<0.001) and diclofenac sodium (SMD -1.36, 95% CI -2.59 to -0.13; p=0.03) in terms ofvisual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and better than lumbar traction (SMD 0.96, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.45; p=0.0001) with respect toJapanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. In addition, the total effective rate in five individual trials was greater for acupuncture than for mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, ibuprofen plus fugui gutong capsule, loxoprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone and huoxue zhitong decoction, respectively. Additionally, two individual trials showed a superior effect of acupuncture in VAS scores comparedwith ibuprofen or mannitol plus dexamethasone, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture showed a more favourable effect in the treatment of LDH than lumbar traction, ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, meloxicam, mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, fugui gutong capsule plus ibuprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone, loxoprofen and huoxue zhitong decoction. However, further rigorously designed, large-scale RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29496679 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2468  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 30  
  Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2470  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2473  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chubak, B.; Doctor, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sexual Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sex Med Rev  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Chinese Herbal Drugs; Meditation; Sexual Dysfunction; Traditional Chinese Medicine; Yoga  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite the growing popularity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the Western world, biomedical students and practitioners struggle to understand TCM and how it relates to their standard diagnosis and treatment practices. AIMS: To describe the fundamentals of TCM theory and practice relevant to sexual dysfunction; to review and critique the current state of TCM research within Western biomedical literature; and to identify sites for improvement of future research and for collaborative integration of TCM and biomedicine in practice. METHODS: Information about TCM from an insider perspective was obtained from English-language textbooks and lectures intended to teach Western students its theory and practice. PubMed search using Medical Subject Heading terms for Western sexual diagnoses and TCM treatments was performed in April and October 2017 to represent the evidence for TCM in Western biomedical literature. Articles in non-English languages and without human subjects were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 27 studies were included in this review. The most commonly studied intervention was acupuncture. An equal number of studies addressed sexual dysfunction in men and women, but only women were included in studies of physically passive mindfulness meditation. RESULTS: Compared with Western biomedicine, TCM offers a more interdisciplinary and individualized approach to disease and its treatment. This embrace of individual idiosyncrasy in diagnosis and treatment presents a challenge to Western biomedical research norms that rely almost exclusively on quantitative methods that compare large and homogeneous groups with a fixed diagnosis and treatment regimen. CONCLUSION: TCM offers a very different understanding of the human body, health, and disease from Western biomedicine. There is value in the study and application of these 2 medical systems, particularly for biopsychosocial problems of sexual dysfunction. However, this must be done cautiously, with attention to appropriate study design, to avoid shallow and unscientific cultural appropriation of TCM practices. Chubak B, Doctor A. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence. Sex Med Rev 2018;X:XXX-XXX.  
  Address Wellpoints, New York, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371144 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2476  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Buchberger, B.; Krabbe, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of outpatient acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynaecol Obstet  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Labor; Meta-analysis; Outpatient care; Pregnancy; Randomized controlled trial; Review  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological option to relieve pregnancy-related complaints. OBJECTIVES: To critically appraise the best available evidence for the use of acupuncture in outpatient care. SEARCH STRATEGY: The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched for English-language and German-language papers published from January 1980 to March 2017 using search terms related to pregnancy combined with 'acupuncture'. SELECTION CRITERIA: Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-pharmacological treatments in unselected or low-risk pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Quality was assessed using a checklist (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were also performed. MAIN RESULTS: High-quality systematic reviews (n=5) and RCTs with low risk of bias (n=3) were identified. The systematic reviews were based on single studies, with small sample sizes, that showed a benefit of acupuncture for evening pelvic pain; pelvic and low-back pain; nausea; functional disability; and sleep quality. Contradictory results were found in the RCTs regarding cesarean delivery; time to delivery; spontaneous labor; fetal distress; and Apgar score. Data pooling emphasized the heterogeneity of results. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to support the use of acupuncture for relief of pregnancy-related conditions was limited.  
  Address Research Unit Health Technology Assessment and Systematic Reviews, Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29355951 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2478  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yue, C.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Jia, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Three Electrical Stimulation Techniques for Rehabilitation After Total Knee Arthroplasty Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Arthroplasty Abbreviated Journal J Arthroplasty  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Ea; Nmes; Tens; Tka; rehabilitation  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparative effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and electroacupuncture (EA) for improving patient rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. Therefore we conducted this systematic review to assess the available evidence. METHODS: The PubMed, OVID, and ScienceDirect databases were comprehensively searched and studies were selected and analyzed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. Data were extracted and qualitatively synthesized for several outcomes. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from 17 randomized controlled trials involving 1285 procedures: 8 NMES studies (608 procedures), 7 TENS studies (560 procedures), and 2 EA studies (117 procedures). Qualitative analysis suggested that NMES was associated with higher quadriceps strength and functional recovery after TKA. Recovery benefits were maximal when the stimulation was performed once or twice a day for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of 100-120 mA and frequency of 30-100 Hz. The electrode should be sufficiently large (100-200 cm(2)) to reduce discomfort. TENS at an intensity of 15-40 mA and frequency of 70-150 Hz provided effective analgesia after TKA. EA at an intensity of 2 mA and frequency of 2 Hz may also provide postoperative analgesia of TKA. CONCLUSION: As adjunct modalities, NMES and TENS can effectively improve rehabilitation after TKA without triggering significant intolerance, and maximal benefits depend on optimized parameters and intervention protocols. EA may be an effective adjunct modality for analgesia after TKA.  
  Address Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Luoyang Orthopedic Hospital of Henan Province, Luoyang, Henan Province, People's Republic of China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29530519 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2506  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, C.A.; Armour, M.; Lee, M.S.; Wang, L.-Q.; Hay, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for depression Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Abbreviated Journal Cochrane Database Syst Rev  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages Cd004046  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Depression is recognised as a major public health problem that has a substantial impact on individuals and on society. People with depression may consider using complementary therapies such as acupuncture, and an increasing body of research has been undertaken to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression. This is the second update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression.To determine:* Whether acupuncture is more effective than treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than control acupuncture for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than pharmacological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture plus pharmacological therapy is more effective than pharmacological therapy alone for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Whether acupuncture is more effective than psychological therapies for treating and improving quality of life for individuals with depression.* Adverse effects of acupuncture compared with treatment as usual/no treatment/wait list control, control acupuncture, pharmacological therapies, and psychological therapies for treatment of individuals with depression. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases to June 2016: Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR), Korean Studies Information Service System (KISS), DBPIA (Korean article database website), Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Research Information Service System (RISS), Korea Med, Korean Medical Database (KM base), and Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), as well as several Korean medical journals. SELECTION CRITERIA: Review criteria called for inclusion of all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture versus control acupuncture, no treatment, medication, other structured psychotherapies (cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychotherapy, or counselling), or standard care. Modes of treatment included acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and laser acupuncture. Participants included adult men and women with depression diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC), International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), or Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders Third Edition Revised (CCMD-3-R). If necessary, we used trial authors' definitions of depressive disorder. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We performed meta-analyses using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcomes were reduction in the severity of depression, measured by self-rating scales or by clinician-rated scales, and improvement in depression, defined as remission versus no remission. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE method. MAIN RESULTS: This review is an update of previous versions and includes 64 studies (7104 participants). Most studies were at high risk of performance bias, at high or unclear risk of detection bias, and at low or unclear risk of selection bias, attrition bias, reporting bias, and other bias.Acupuncture versus no treatment/wait list/treatment as usualWe found low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture (manual and electro-) may moderately reduce the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.66, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.25, five trials, 488 participants). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.35 to 2.24, one trial, 302 participants; low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus control acupuncture (invasive, non-invasive sham controls)Acupuncture may be associated with a small reduction in the severity of depression of 1.69 points on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) by end of treatment (95% CI -3.33 to -0.05, 14 trials, 841 participants; low-quality evidence). It is unclear whether data show differences between groups in the risk of adverse events (RR 1.63, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.86, five trials, 300 participants; moderate-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus medicationWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture may confer small benefit in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.05, 31 trials, 3127 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different classes of medications and different modes of acupuncture stimulation. Very low-quality evidence suggests lower ratings of adverse events following acupuncture compared with medication alone, as measured by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (mean difference (MD) -4.32, 95% CI -7.41 to -1.23, three trials, 481 participants).Acupuncture plus medication versus medication aloneWe found very low-quality evidence suggesting that acupuncture is highly beneficial in reducing the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -1.15, 95% CI -1.63 to -0.66, 11 trials, 775 participants). Studies show substantial variation resulting from use of different modes of acupuncture stimulation. It is unclear whether differences in adverse events are associated with different modes of acupuncture (SMD -1.32, 95% CI -2.86 to 0.23, three trials, 200 participants; very low-quality evidence).Acupuncture versus psychological therapyIt is unclear whether data show differences between acupuncture and psychological therapy in the severity of depression by end of treatment (SMD -0.5, 95% CI -1.33 to 0.33, two trials, 497 participants; low-quality evidence). Low-quality evidence suggests no differences between groups in rates of adverse events (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.33, one trial, 452 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in severity of depression was less when acupuncture was compared with control acupuncture than when acupuncture was compared with no treatment control, although in both cases, results were rated as providing low-quality evidence. The reduction in severity of depression with acupuncture given alone or in conjunction with medication versus medication alone is uncertain owing to the very low quality of evidence. The effect of acupuncture compared with psychological therapy is unclear. The risk of adverse events with acupuncture is also unclear, as most trials did not report adverse events adequately. Few studies included follow-up periods or assessed important outcomes such as quality of life. High-quality randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to examine the clinical efficacy and acceptability of acupuncture, as well as its effectiveness, compared with acupuncture controls, medication, or psychological therapies.  
  Address National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29502347 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2508  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tang, S.; Mo, Z.; Zhang, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society Abbreviated Journal Acupunct Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). METHODS: Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for LDH. A meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 and the evidence level was assessed using GRADE methodology. RESULTS: Thirty RCTs involving 3503 participants were included in the study. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had a higher total effective rate than lumbar traction (RR=1.1, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15; p<0.001), ibuprofen (RR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.48; p=0.02), diclofenac sodium (RR=1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.67; p<0.001) and meloxicam (RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.31; p=0.01). Acupuncture was also better than lumbar traction (SMD -1.33, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.84; p<0.001) and diclofenac sodium (SMD -1.36, 95% CI -2.59 to -0.13; p=0.03) in terms ofvisual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and better than lumbar traction (SMD 0.96, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.45; p=0.0001) with respect toJapanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. In addition, the total effective rate in five individual trials was greater for acupuncture than for mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, ibuprofen plus fugui gutong capsule, loxoprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone and huoxue zhitong decoction, respectively. Additionally, two individual trials showed a superior effect of acupuncture in VAS scores comparedwith ibuprofen or mannitol plus dexamethasone, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture showed a more favourable effect in the treatment of LDH than lumbar traction, ibuprofen, diclofenac sodium, meloxicam, mannitol plus dexamethasone and mecobalamin, fugui gutong capsule plus ibuprofen, mannitol plus dexamethasone, loxoprofen and huoxue zhitong decoction. However, further rigorously designed, large-scale RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.  
  Address College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29496679 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2509  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chau, J.P.C.; Lo, S.H.S.; Yu, X.; Choi, K.C.; Lau, A.Y.L.; Wu, J.C.Y.; Lee, V.W.Y.; Cheung, W.H.N.; Ching, J.Y.L.; Thompson, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Acupuncture on the Recovery Outcomes of Stroke Survivors with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 30  
  Keywords acupuncture; alternative and complementary medicine; poststroke shoulder pain; rehabilitation; stroke; systematic review; traditional Chinese medicine  
  Abstract Background: Poststroke shoulder pain limits stroke survivors' physical functioning, impairs their ability to perform daily activities, and compromises their quality of life. The use of acupuncture to manage shoulder pain after a stroke is believed to free the blockage of energy flow and produce analgesic effects, but the evidence is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review to summarize the current evidence on the effects of acupuncture on the recovery outcomes of stroke survivors with shoulder pain. Methods: Fourteen English and Chinese databases were searched for data from January 2009 to August 2017. The review included adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who had developed shoulder pain and had undergone conventional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, fire needle acupuncture, or warm needle acupuncture. The participants in the comparison group received the usual stroke care only. Results: Twenty-nine randomized controlled trials were included. Most studies were assessed as having a substantial risk of bias. Moreover, due to the high heterogeneity of the acupuncture therapies examined, pooling the results in a meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative summary of the results is thus presented. The review showed that conventional acupuncture can be associated with benefits in reducing pain and edema and improving upper extremity function and physical function. The effects of conventional acupuncture on improving shoulder range of motion (ROM) are in doubt because this outcome was only examined in two trials. Electroacupuncture might be effective in reducing shoulder pain and improving upper extremity function, and conclusions on the effects of electroacupuncture on edema, shoulder ROM, and physical function cannot be drawn due to the limited number of eligible trials. The evidence to support the use of fire needle or warm needle acupuncture in stroke survivors with shoulder pain is also inconclusive due to the limited number of studies. Conclusion: Although most studies reviewed concluded that conventional and electroacupuncture could be effective for management of shoulder pain after stroke, the very high potential for bias should be considered. Further work in this area is needed that employs standardized acupuncture treatment modalities, endpoint assessments, and blinding of treatments.  
  Address School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29445354; PMCID:PMC5797784 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2511  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, L.-C.; Weng, P.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Tsuang, Y.-H.; Chiang, C.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Abbreviated Journal Reg Anesth Pain Med  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. METHODS: Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = -0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15-1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = -1.24; 95% CI, -1.83 to -0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.  
  Address  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29394211 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2514  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chubak, B.; Doctor, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence Type of Study Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sexual Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sex Med Rev  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Acupuncture; Chinese Herbal Drugs; Meditation; Sexual Dysfunction; Traditional Chinese Medicine; Yoga  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite the growing popularity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the Western world, biomedical students and practitioners struggle to understand TCM and how it relates to their standard diagnosis and treatment practices. AIMS: To describe the fundamentals of TCM theory and practice relevant to sexual dysfunction; to review and critique the current state of TCM research within Western biomedical literature; and to identify sites for improvement of future research and for collaborative integration of TCM and biomedicine in practice. METHODS: Information about TCM from an insider perspective was obtained from English-language textbooks and lectures intended to teach Western students its theory and practice. PubMed search using Medical Subject Heading terms for Western sexual diagnoses and TCM treatments was performed in April and October 2017 to represent the evidence for TCM in Western biomedical literature. Articles in non-English languages and without human subjects were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 27 studies were included in this review. The most commonly studied intervention was acupuncture. An equal number of studies addressed sexual dysfunction in men and women, but only women were included in studies of physically passive mindfulness meditation. RESULTS: Compared with Western biomedicine, TCM offers a more interdisciplinary and individualized approach to disease and its treatment. This embrace of individual idiosyncrasy in diagnosis and treatment presents a challenge to Western biomedical research norms that rely almost exclusively on quantitative methods that compare large and homogeneous groups with a fixed diagnosis and treatment regimen. CONCLUSION: TCM offers a very different understanding of the human body, health, and disease from Western biomedicine. There is value in the study and application of these 2 medical systems, particularly for biopsychosocial problems of sexual dysfunction. However, this must be done cautiously, with attention to appropriate study design, to avoid shallow and unscientific cultural appropriation of TCM practices. Chubak B, Doctor A. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Sexual Dysfunction: Review of the Evidence. Sex Med Rev 2018;X:XXX-XXX.  
  Address Wellpoints, New York, NY, USA  
  Publisher
  Language English Number of Treatments  
  Treatment Follow-up Frequency Number of Participants  
  Time in Treatment Condition
  Disease Category OCSI Score  
  Notes PMID:29371144 Approved no  
  Call Number OCOM @ refbase @ Serial 2517  
Permanent link to this record
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